INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY CARLOW

deliriousattackInternet και Εφαρμογές Web

4 Δεκ 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 10 μήνες)

82 εμφανίσεις

INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY CARLOW


SCHOOL OF BUSINESS & HUMANITIES


DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS & COMMUNICATIONS



AUTUMN EXAMINATIONS 2009




Course Code:

CW838

DATE:

THURSDAY,

27 AUGUST 2009


HHMKTB

TIME:

09.30


11.30



DURATION:

2 HOURS






Year:

4



Course Title:

BACHELOR OF BUSINESS (HONS) IN MARKETING



Subject:

STRATEGIC BRAND MANAGEMENT





Examiners:

Mr M Attride

Mr D Fleming

Mr B Mc Intyre




INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES:


1.

Write your Name, Course, Course Year and Class Group on your answer
book.

2.

Answer Question One and TWO (2) other questions.

3.

Marks as indicated per question.

_________________________________________________________





Minicase:

Catherine Fulvio, a guesthouse owner, is looking to raise a bigger business through
her growing

cookery school.

Ballyknocken House’s challenges



Develop a brand identity for Ballyknocken’s cookery school



Bring in more business from the corporate side and from organisers



Establish greater use of the place during the early part of the week

The growth o
f budget hotels with a cheap and cheerful approach has undermined
much of the traditional home
-
based guesthouse business. Owners have faced the
choice of either adapting to this environment or closing their doors.

Ballyknocken
House, near Ashford in Co Wic
klow, is one facility that has taken a positive approach
to its future. With its accommodation business slowing in recent years, the owner,
Catherine Fulvio, has given it a new lease of life by establishing a cookery school.

Now

she needs to capitalise on
the investment she has made, win more high

margin
business and develop a brand around the venue’s obvious attractions. Fulvio grew up
in the Victorian farmhouse that her mother turned into a guesthouse in the late 1960s
and recalls fetching fresh eggs from

the chicken coop for guests’ breakfasts from the
age of five. Her mother developed a thriving business with a strong international
client base. When her mother died, Fulvio took over the running, following a spell
working at the upmarket Tinakilly House h
otel. Fulvio’s lifelong interest in cooking
was encouraged by a three
-
month residential course at the Ballymaloe House in Co
Cork. “When I returned, I found I had a new passion for food and people wanted me
to demonstrate recipes. I could see the potential

for developing classes as a sideline,”
she said.

In 2000, Fulvio converted the farm’s former milking parlour into a fully equipped
cookery school. She also upgraded accommodation at the farmhouse, reducing the
number of bedrooms to seven large rooms to ac
hieve a four
-
star rating.

The total
investment of about €200,000 was raised through a mortgage and she has recently
invested a further €50,000 in a further upgrade. The decision to diversify into the
cookery school proved fortunate. While the two wings of
the business complement
each other, the school now accounts for a larger part of the business than the
guesthouse and is the area that Fulvio wants to expand.

Turnover at Ballyknocken is
targeted to hit €1m this year, up from €800,000 in 2007. Fulvio said
that 65% of
revenue now comes from the cookery school, which has seen a jump of about 50% in
business over the past year.

The cookery school runs mainly one

day courses, with
prices starting from about €110 for a half
-
day public course, which incorporates
a
lunch. Most clients attend the courses and then go home, but can also stay in the
guesthouse as part of the package. “It’s an ideal present for someone who’s
interested in cooking and gift vouchers are a big part of our business,” said Fulvio.

“It’s a re
laxed way of improving your cookery skills. There’s a lot of banter between
the guests about their culinary efforts and we let people have a glass of wine when the
knives are put away.”

The courses range from Italian, Indian, Japanese, Mexican and Thai coo
king to bread

making, tapas, seafood, wine tasting and chocolate
-
making and take place on
Saturdays and Sundays. The school runs morning and afternoon classes and these can
be booked online. As the public face of the school, Fulvio recognises that she need
s to
be visible and leads as many of the courses as she can, but she is now bringing in well

established cookery experts to share the load. While it is set in a picturesque rural
environment, proximity to Dublin is one of Ballyknocken’s key advantages. Loc
ated
10 minutes from the N11 motorway, it can be reached from the city centre in about an
hour. Fulvio has capitalised on this by targeting corporates, with a basic cookery
package starting at about €1,000 per 10 participants. Packages can also include
out
door activities such as walks, archery, clay pigeon shooting, off
-
road driving and
quad biking. Accommodation can also be incorporated in these packages and Fulvio
has developed links with local hotels to incorporate rooms for larger parties when she
canno
t accommodate numbers. Recent corporate clients have included ESB, 02,
PayPal and Novartis. “Some of our corporate customers use the facilities for off
-
site
meetings and then do some cooking and other activities and can have dinner here in
the evenings. It

provides a great getaway environment,” she said. Fulvio is keen to
develop the corporate end of the business and recognises that group bookings are less
labour
-
intensive and provide a more efficient use of the school’s resources.

She has recently taken on

a sales and marketing manager to target corporates as well
as event organisers. “We try and bring the key influencers down so they can sample
the facilities first
-
hand,” she said. “Our timing may be good. Our research indicates
that corporates are looking

for off
-
site activities that are more widely inclusive and
less dangerous, as liability is becoming more of an issue.”

The guesthouse and school
employ up to 15 staff in high season and Fulvio takes on trainees from catering
schools in Europe to help with

the demonstrations. Ballyknocken House has received
a number of awards, including the Jameson Farmhouse of the Year Award in 2004,
and features in leading accommodation guides. Fulvio said that while the business
was profitable, margins were under increas
ed pressure due to significant increases in
basic raw materials over the past year. Finding cost
-
effective ways of marketing the
business is a challenge. Fulvio said the web had replaced word of mouth as the main
driver of business, with about 70% of custo
mers either booking online on her website
or researching the facility online before a telephone booking. Two
-
fifths of
Ballyknocken’s business is from overseas tourists and she is keen to increase business
here, capitalising on the easy access from Dublin.

However, with a relatively short tourist season, Fulvio knows that she needs to get
more Irish customers through the doors. Her own profile may hold the key to raising
awareness of the school. She has secured a regular cookery slot on TV3’s Ireland AM
pro
gramme and writes features for the Irish Garden magazine on herbs. She is also
looking at the possibility of a cookery book on Ballyknocken House, following the
successful examples of Ballymaloe and Avoca. Establishing a shop on site is another
possibility
.

While the facility is generally well used between Thursday and Sunday,
Fulvio is also keen to have it in more use earlier in the week

One possibility is to
introduce three
-
day residential courses. Fulvio is certain of one thing, however: the
future of Ba
llyknocken House is centred around the cookery school. “That’s where
the growth is and where the future clearly lies,” she said.

Your services are required as a Brand Marketing Consultant to advise Catherine

on
the following:



Q
UESTION
1


(a)

How she might develop a brand identity for Ballyknocken’s cookery school.









(20 marks)


(b)

How she can bring in more business from the corporate segment.

(15 marks)


(c)

H
ow she can establish greater use of the place during the early part of the
week









(15 marks)


TOTAL: 50 MARKS


Q
UESTION
2


(
a)


Proctor and Gamble sustain

it’s market leadership through an innovative
brand management system in the consumer packaged goods area. Examine 10
ways in which Proctor and Gamble sustain
s

its brand market leadership?










(10 marks)

(
b)

Provide
five

examples of brand naming options?



(15 marks)

TOTAL: 25 MARKS



Q
UESTION
3



(
a)

Tesco

has proven difficult to label as a supermarket that targets a specific
consumer profile type. Explain how they successfully achieve their multi
-
branding strategy.







(10
marks)


(
b)

Explain how the Brandz Model is used by Millward Brown to measure the
brand equity of the world
’s

leading brands.




(15 marks)


TOTAL: 25 MARKS



Q
UESTION
4



(
a)

Ikea, the world’s largest furniture retailer, is positioned as a company offering

good quality furniture”

at a low price. Assess the strength of Ikea
’s

positioning and differentiation strategy using five differentiation criteria of
your ch
oice:









(20

marks)


(
b)

Identify two benefits o
f regularly auditing your brand
?


(5 marks)


TOTAL: 25 MARKS

I
NSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY CARLOW

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS &
HUMANITIES


End of Module Exam 2009

CLASS




YEAR




GROUP



BBS Hons. (Marketing)

SESSION



Autumn 2009

ACADEMIC
YEAR



2009

SUBJECT



Strategic Brand Management

LECTURER:




Mark Attride


Instructions:

2 hours

Answer Q1 and two other questions

Minicase:

Catherine Fulvio, a guesthouse owner, is looking to raise a bigger business
through her growing cookery school.

Ballyknocken House’s challenges



Develop a brand identity for Ballyknocken’s cookery school



Bring in more business from the corporate
side and from organisers



Establish greater use of the place during the early part of the week

The growth of budget hotels with a cheap and cheerful approach has
undermined much of the traditional home
-
based guesthouse business.
Owners have faced the choice

of either adapting to this environment or
closing their doors. Ballyknocken House, near Ashford in Co Wicklow, is one
facility that has taken a positive approach to its future. With its
accommodation business slowing in recent years, the owner, Catherine
Fulvio, has given it a new lease of life by establishing a cookery school. Now
she needs to capitalise on the investment she has made, win more high
margin business and develop a brand around the venue’s obvious attractions.
Fulvio grew up in the Victorian

farmhouse that her mother turned into a
guesthouse in the late 1960s and recalls fetching fresh eggs from the chicken
coop for guests’ breakfasts from the age of five. Her mother developed a
thriving business with a strong international client base. When
her mother
died, Fulvio took over the running, following a spell working at the upmarket
Tinakilly House hotel. Fulvio’s lifelong interest in cooking was encouraged by
a three
-
month residential course at the Ballymaloe House in Co Cork. “When I
returned, I

found I had a new passion for food and people wanted me to
demonstrate recipes. I could see the potential for developing classes as a
sideline,” she said.

In 2000, Fulvio converted the farm’s former milking parlour into a fully
equipped cookery school. Sh
e also upgraded accommodation at the
farmhouse, reducing the number of bedrooms to seven large rooms to
achieve a four
-
star rating. The total investment of about €200,000 was raised
through a mortgage and she has recently invested a further €50,000 in a
fu
rther upgrade. The decision to diversify into the cookery school proved
fortunate. While the two wings of the business complement each other, the
school now accounts for a larger part of the business than the guesthouse
and is the area that Fulvio wants to

expand. Turnover at Ballyknocken is
targeted to hit €1m this year, up from €800,000 in 2007. Fulvio said that 65%
of revenue now comes from the cookery school, which has seen a jump of
about 50% in business over the past year. The cookery school runs main
ly
one day courses, with prices starting from about €110 for a half
-
day public
course, which incorporates a lunch. Most clients attend the courses and then
go home, but can also stay in the guesthouse as part of the package. “It’s an
ideal present for some
one who’s interested in cooking and gift vouchers are a
big part of our business,” said Fulvio. “It’s a relaxed way of improving your
cookery skills. There’s a lot of banter between the guests about their culinary
efforts and we let people have a glass of
wine when the knives are put away.”

The courses range from Italian, Indian, Japanese, Mexican and Thai cooking
to bread making, tapas, seafood, wine tasting and chocolate
-
making and take
place on Saturdays and Sundays. The school runs morning and afternoon

classes and these can be booked online. As the public face of the school,
Fulvio recognises that she needs to be visible and leads as many of the
courses as she can, but she is now bringing in well established cookery
experts to share the load. While it i
s set in a picturesque rural environment,
proximity to Dublin is one of Ballyknocken’s key advantages. Located 10
minutes from the N11 motorway, it can be reached from the city centre in
about an hour. Fulvio has capitalised on this by targeting corporates
, with a
basic cookery package starting at about €1,000 per 10 participants. Packages
can also include outdoor activities such as walks, archery, clay pigeon
shooting, off
-
road driving and quad biking. Accommodation can also be
incorporated in these packag
es and Fulvio has developed links with local
hotels to incorporate rooms for larger parties when she cannot accommodate
numbers. Recent corporate clients have included ESB, 02, PayPal and
Novartis. “Some of our corporate customers use the facilities for of
f
-
site
meetings and then do some cooking and other activities and can have dinner
here in the evenings. It provides a great getaway environment,” she said.
Fulvio is keen to develop the corporate end of the business and recognises
that group bookings are l
ess labour
-
intensive and provide a more efficient use
of the school’s resources.

She has recently taken on a sales and marketing manager to target
corporates as well as event organisers. “We try and bring the key influencers
down so they can sample the fac
ilities first
-
hand,” she said. “Our timing may
be good. Our research indicates that corporates are looking for off
-
site
activities that are more widely inclusive and less dangerous, as liability is
becoming more of an issue.” The guesthouse and school empl
oy up to 15
staff in high season and Fulvio takes on trainees from catering schools in
Europe to help with the demonstrations. Ballyknocken House has received a
number of awards, including the Jameson Farmhouse of the Year Award in
2004, and features in le
ading accommodation guides. Fulvio said that while
the business was profitable, margins were under increased pressure due to
significant increases in basic raw materials over the past year. Finding cost
-
effective ways of marketing the business is a challen
ge. Fulvio said the web
had replaced word of mouth as the main driver of business, with about 70% of
customers either booking online on her website or researching the facility
online before a telephone booking. Two
-
fifths of Ballyknocken’s business is
from

overseas tourists and she is keen to increase business here, capitalising
on the easy access from Dublin.

However, with a relatively short tourist season, Fulvio knows that she needs
to get more Irish customers through the doors. Her own profile may hold
the
key to raising awareness of the school. She has secured a regular cookery
slot on TV3’s Ireland AM programme and writes features for the Irish Garden
magazine on herbs. She is also looking at the possibility of a cookery book on
Ballyknocken House, fol
lowing the successful examples of Ballymaloe and
Avoca. Establishing a shop on site is another possibility. While the facility is
generally well used between Thursday and Sunday, Fulvio is also keen to
have it in more use earlier in the week One possibilit
y is to introduce three
-
day residential courses. Fulvio is certain of one thing, however: the future of
Ballyknocken House is centred around the cookery school. “That’s where the
growth is and where the future clearly lies,” she said.

Your services are req
uired as a Brand Marketing Consultant to advise
Catherine on the following:


(d)

How she might develop a brand identity for Ballyknocken’s cookery
school.







(20 marks)

(e)

How she can bring in more business from the corporate segment.











(15 marks)

(f)

How
she can establish greater use of the place during the early part of
the week







(15 marks)


Suggested Solutions:

a)

Catherine needs to carry out research to find clear answers to the
following in order to establish a strong brand identity.



What services do
es she want to offer?



What are the core values of the service?



What do you specialise in?



Who is your target market?



What colour/logos do you want associated with your brand?



What is the tagline for your business to be?



What is the personality of your
business?



What sort of relationship do you want with your customers?

Once Catherine has a clear overview of her business and the unique selling
proposition (USP) of it, she can work on building a stronger brand identity.
S
he can then focus on the recruitm
ent, team training, customer service and
systems needed to deliver that unique experience. This USP must be
communicated on all marketing materials to reinforce the promise of this
uniqueness and to let prospective clients know why they should choose
Bally
knocken over competitors. She should then put in place systems or
checklists to maintain consistency so that Ballyknocken delivers on that
promised experience every time.

b)

The corporate sector offers business potential for Ballyknocken House.
Catherine Fulv
io could compile a list of target companies in Dublin and
south Leinster, identify their key purchasing influencers, and make
personal contact. Then she should compile a database of other
corporate customers who have visited Ballyknocken House and keep
the
m informed of special offers and rates. Invite selected potential
clients to sample the services and sponsor a “break away” competition
in business publications. Building a relationship with corporate clients
can also give Ballyknocken House access to a wi
der audience


their
employees.

c)

Catherine Fulvio is operating a very strong business and needs to
make just a few tweaks to make it a total success. She has a high media
profile, so with some creative marketing, both traditional and online, the
problem
of midweek capacity can be overcome. The website should make
the most of the celebrity behind the company, and include customer
testimonials. Fulvio should invest in search engine optimisation picking up
anyone looking for cooking, golf or country breaks.
She should develop
themed weekday breaks for women,

retired people and tourists to lure
customers Monday through Thursday. There may be also opportunities to
do joint promotions with other interested parties who would benefit from
the publicity e.g. leisu
re, hospitality companies in the area.

Q2


a)


Proctor and Gamble sustain

it’s market leadership through an
innovative brand management system in the consumer packaged goods area.
Examine 10 ways in which Proctor and Gamble sustains its brand market
leade
rship?








(10 marks)


b)

Provide five examples of brand naming options? (15 marks)

Solution:


2a)

1.

Customer knowledge

2.

Long term outlook

3.

Product innovation

4.

Quality strategy

5.

Brand extension strategy

6.

Multibrand strategy

7.

Communications Pioneer though the w
eb

8.

Aggressive sales force

9.

Manufacturing efficiency and cost cutting

10.

Brand Management/Category Management System

2 b)



Individual Brand names
: Proctor and Gamble in Shampoos:
Clairol, Pantene, Head and Shoulders, herbal essence, Vidal
Sassoon.











Blanket Family names
: examples would be Heinz, Knorr,
Campbell Soup.








Separate Family Names for All Products
: This is followed by
companies like Philips where they produce separate unrelated
products and use different family names. Examples would be
Ph
ilips and Whirlpool.












Corporate name combined with individual product name
:
.
Examples are Kelloggs’s Rice Crispies and Cadbury Dairy Milk etc.,





Brand Licencing Option
:

through an
already established brand.
E.g C
aterpillar.








Q3


a)

Tesco ha
s proven difficult to label as a supermarket that targets a
specific consumer profile type. Explain how they successfully achieve their
multi
-
branding strategy.






(10 marks)

b)

Explain how the Brandz Model is used by Millward Brown to measure
the brand

equity of the world leading brands.



(15 marks)




Solution:


3 a)

Tesco’s policy is to sell everything, to everyone, everywhere. They are
very successfully at catering for all needs through their multi
-
brand store
range with the primary 3 pillar brands
built around Finest, Standard and Value
ranges. These further extend into Healthy Living, Free From, Fairtrade and
organics. This clever multi
-
branding ensures that all customers with different
needs at different times are catered for and offered real cho
ice. They are also
successfully extending this strategy in the non
-
food area.


3 b)

BrandZ

is a brand equity database. It holds data from over 650,000
consumers and professionals across 31 countries, comparing over 23,000
brands. The database is used to es
timate brand valuations, and, since 2006,
has been used to generate a yearly list of top brands, headed in 2007 by
Google, General Electric, Microsoft, Coca
-
Cola, and China Mobile.

BrandZ was developed by Millward Brown, starting in 1998. It collects data

annually from consumers, with each person asked to evaluate brands in a
competitive context from a category they shop in. This yields opinions from
people who know the category and therefore can judge a brand based on the
attributes that are important to
them. Sectors covered include: consumer
packaged goods (FMCG), retail/e
-
commerce, long purchase cycle brands,
service, and corporate. Using this data, BrandZ attempts to compute numbers
which quantify the degree of consumer loyalty to each brand, and the b
rands'
growth potentials.




Q4


a)

Ikea, the world’s largest furniture retailer, is positioned as a company
offering
”good quality furniture”

at a low price. Assess the strength of
Ikea positioning and differentiation strategy using five differentiation
criteria of your choice:





(20 marks)

b)

Identify two benefits of regularly auditing your brand ?


(5 marks)


Solution:

4 a)

Differentiation
Criteria

1.

Important
: the difference delivers a highly valued benefit to
sufficient numbers of buyers. Ikea delivers on quality/value.

2.

Distinctive:

The difference is delivered in a distinctive way. Ikea
store atmosphere is very customer friendly and informat
ive.

3.

Superior:

The difference is superior to other ways of obtaining the
benefit. The Ikea shopping experience is unique and considered
entertaining by many clients.

4.

Affordable:

Value is a key deliverable.

5.

Pre
-
emptive:

The difference cannot be easily copied by
competitors. No competitors appear to have been able to copy
Ikea’s formula.


Solution (b)

1.

Allows you to take a fresh look at how your brand(s) is performing,
examine if they are maintaining a competitive edge and

challenge
their continued relevance to the consumer.

2.

The findings of your brand auditing process forms the basis on
which many of your business, marketing, and communications
decisions should be made.