(Hons) Business Management - University of Bolton

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20 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 10 μήνες)

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PROGRAMME HANDBOOK


BA (HONS)

BUSINESS MA
NAGEMENT

(Marketing)


Single Honours


20
11
-
20
1
2












Faculty of Well
-
Being and Social Sciences

s


-

1

-















































Frequent reference is made throughout this
Programme
Handbook to University
policies, procedures, regulations and codes of practice which apply to you
. P
arts of
these
are sometimes summarised here for your benefit. In all cases,
these
summaries
are subject

to the full University versions referred to
. I
n the case of any
conflict between the
lat
ter and any summaries presented here,

it is the full Univer
sity
versions which will apply.


-

2

-

Contents

Academic Calendar 20
10
-
11








3

Welcome Statement









4

I
ntroduction










5











PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND CONTENT





5

1.1


Aims of the Programme








5

1.2

Programme Features









5

1.3

Programme Structure








6

1.4

Levels of Study









7

1.5

Professional Body or Professional/Subject A
ssociation Accreditation


8

1.6


Module Specifications








8


2. SUPPORT FOR STUDENTS







9

2.1


Programm
e Management and Delivery






9

2.2


Induction









9

2.3


Programme Support








9

2.4 Support for International Students






1
2

2.
5



Support for Part
-
ti
me Students







12

2.
6



Students with Disabilities, Learning Dif
ficulties or Specific Needs



12

2.
7



Student Representatives and the Programme Committee





1
3

2.
8



M
itigating Circumstances







1
3

2.
9



Complaint
s









1
4


3. ACCOMMODATION AND COMMUNICATION





15

3.1


Accommodation









15

3.2


Opening Hours of Relevant Offices






15

3.3

Communication Systems







1
6


3.4

Contacting Staff









1
7

3.5

Key Personnel









1
8


4. TEACHING AND
LEARNING







18

4.1.

Teaching and Learning Methods






18

4.2

Personal Development Planni
ng and Professional Skills




20

4.
3

Information Literacy








20

4.
4
.

Module Assessment and Methods






20

4.
5


Learning Opportunities Overseas






21


5.
ASSESSEMENT

2
2

5.1

Assessment Strategy

2
2

5.2

Assessment Criteria

2
2

5.3

Guidelines for the Preparation and Submission of Assignments

23

5.4



Procedures for Examinations

2
5

5.5



Moderation of Marks


2
5

5.6

Feedback on Assessments

2
6


5.7

Referencing

2
6


5.8

Use of Unfair Means

2
6

5.9

Publication of Results, Awards Ceremonies

27

5.10

Requests for Reviews of decision of boards of examines (
Appeals
)

2
7


6. ATTENDANCE AND WITHDRAWAL

28


7. STUDENT FEEDBACK

29


8. HEALTH, SAFETY AND WELFARE

2
9


9. ST
UDENT DISCIPLINE

30



Appendices


3
1

1.

Programme Specification









2.

General Assessment Criteria HE4
-
HE6







3.

Curriculum
Skills Map









4.

Assessment Summary Table








5.

Curriculum Outcomes Map




-

3

-




Academic Calendar 20
11
-
12





University

Week

Week Commencing

Activity

8

Mon
19

September 201
1

Induction

9

Mon 2
6

September 201
1

Teaching Week 1

10

Mon
3

October 201
1

Teaching Week 2

11

Mon 1
0

October 201
1

Teaching Week 3

12

Mon 1
7

October 201
1

Teaching Week 4

13

Mon 2
4

October 201
1

Teaching Week 5

14

Mon
31 November

201
1

Teaching Week 6

15

Mon
7

November 201
1

Teaching Week 7

16

Mon 1
4

November 201
1

Teaching Week 8

17

Mon 2
1

November 201
1

Teaching Week 9

18

Mon 2
8

November 201
1

Teaching Week 10

19

Mon
5

December 201
1

Teaching Week 11

20

Mon 1
2

December 201
1

Teaching Week 12

21

Mon
19

December 201
1

Winter Vacation

22

Mon
26

December 201
1

Winter Vacation

23

Mon
2

January 201
2

Winter Vacation

24

Mon
9

January 201
2

Teaching Week 13

25

Mon 1
6

January 201
2

Teaching Week 14/Assessment

26

Mon 2
3

January 201
2

Independent Study Week

27

Mon 3
0

January 201
2

Independent Study Week

28

Mon
6

February 201
2

Teaching Week 1

29

Mon 1
3

February 201
2

Teaching Week 2

30

Mon 2
0

February 201
2

Teaching Week 3

31

Mon 2
7

February 201
2

Teaching Week 4

32

Mon
5

March 201
2

Teaching Week 5

33

Mon 1
2

March 201
2

Teaching Week 6

34

Mon
19

March 201
2

Teaching Week 7

35

Mon 2
6

March 201
2

Spring Vacation

36

Mon
2

April 201
2

Spring Vacation

37

Mon
09

April 201
2

Spring Vacation

38

Mon 1
6

April 2011

Teaching Week
8


39

Mon 2
3

April 201
2

Teaching Week
9


40

Mon
30 April

201
2

Teaching Week
10


41

Mon
7

May 201
2

Teaching Week 11

42

Mon
14

May 201
2

Teaching Week 12

43

Mon 2
1

May 201
2

Teaching Week 13

44

Mon
28

May 201
2

Teaching Week 14/Assessment

45

Mon
4

June 201
2

Assessment cont‟d

46

Mon 1
1

June 201
2

Assessment activities

47

Mon
18

June 201
2

Assessment activities

48

Mon 2
5

June 201
2

Assessment activities

49

Mon
2

July 201
2

Summer Vacation

50

Mon
09

July 201
2

Summer Vacation

51

Mon 1
6

July 201
2

Summer Vacation

52

Mon 2
3

July 201
2

Summer Vacation











-

4

-






Welcome Statement




Dear
Student


On behalf of all the staff within the Business Team in the Faculty of Well
-
Being and
Social Sciences, I would like to welcome you to the new academic year.


The University is proud of its track record in delivering excellent student satisfaction
and staff in the Business Team will strive to continue to make your studies as fulfilling
and fruitful as possible this year. I
t is our aim to provide an excellent service and to
make your studies as rewarding and fulfilling as possible.


We ask that you

attend your classes as scheduled and participate fully in them. We
ask you to treat your fellow students and tutors with respect and consideration, as
you would expect them to treat you. If there are things that could be changed for the
better, we would w
elcome your comments.


I would like to take this opportunity, on behalf of the Business Team, to wish you
every success in your programme of study.




Bob Barrett

Academic Manager


Business

Faculty of Well
-
Being and Social Sciences









-

5

-

Introduction

This Programme Handbook is designed to ensure that you can find key information
about your programme of study. It should be read in conjunction with information
relating to University

policies, procedures and regulations accessible via
the
University‟s Web

pages.




1.


PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND CONTENT


1.1

Aims of the Business Management (Marketing) Programme

The aims of the Business Management (Marketing) programme are:




To develop focussed multi
-
disciplinary knowledge and understanding of Business
Management
and Marketing



To provide the opportunity to develop knowledge and understanding of Business
Management in a Marketing context.



To develop skills necessary for investigation of Business Management and
Marketing problems.



To develop transferable skills for u
se in the workplace.



To develop a positive disposition towards, and the skills for, lifelong learning.



Through Personal Development Planning (PDP), to develop the skills to plan for
personal, educational and career development.





(See
Appendices for a copy of the full Programme Specification)


1.2


Programme Features

The Business Management (Marketing) degree incorporates both generic and
subject specific modules and has been designed to reflect both business
management practice and ac
ademic developments.
The programme will challenge
you to develop and apply a broad range of skills in a progressive learning
environment. You will develop a capacity for critical reasoning and analysis,
synthesis of data and interpretation of findings, app
lication of concepts, and
identification and solving of problems. Practical and transferable skills include use of
quantitative and qualitative research methods, communication, teamwork,
organisation

and time management, numerical and competent use of info
rmation
technology.






-

6

-

1.3


BA (Hons) Business Management
(Marketing)
Programme Structure
:


Single Honours




LEVEL HE4


CORE

MANAGE
-
MENT
SKILLS

BAM1002


CORE

MANAGING
PEOPLE

HRM1300


CORE

PRINCIPLES

OF
MARKETING

MKT1300

CORE

BUSINESS

ENVIRONMENT

BAM1000

CORE

BUSINESS
FINANCE

BAM1001

CORE

INTRODUCTION TO
SERVICES
MARKET
ING

MKT130
1

Students will take
six
core modules.


LEVEL HE5


CORE

FINANCIAL
DECISION
-
MAKING
FOR
BUSINESS
MANAGERS

BAM2001

CORE

MANAGING

ORGANISATIONAL
BEHAVIOUR

BAM2002

CORE

INTER
-
NATIONAL
MARKETING

MKT2500

CORE

RESEARCH

METHODS

BAM2003

OR

OPERATIONS
MANAGE
-
MENT

BAM2007

CORE

WORK
EXPERIENCE

BAM2005


CORE

MARKETING
COMM
-
UNICATIONS

MKT2501

Students will take
six
core modules
.


LEVEL HE6


CORE

BUSINESS
MANAGEMENT
PROJECT

40 credits


BAM3001

or

INVESTIGATIVE
STUDY

20 credits

BAM3005

CORE

CONTEMPORARY

MANAGEMENT
ISSUES

BAM3011


CORE

MARKETING

MANAGE
-
MENT

MKT3001

CORE

STRATEGIC

MANAGE
-
MENT

BAM3003

OPTIONS

MARKETING

STRATEGY

MKT3002

And/
or

BUYING
BEHAVIOUR

MKT3003


Students will take the core modules of Contemporary Management Issues, Strategic
Management and either the Project with
one

option or Investigative Study with
two
options
.


Students may take the equivalent of 3 HE5 or HE6 modules at a partner institution

abroad.



In order to obtain a classified honours degree
full
-
time

students take six Part I
modules (three per semester) in their first year, and twelve Part II modules (three per
semester) over their second and third years.


For
p
art
-
time
students the
programme is

studied over a longer period,
with
a
maximum of two
modules
per semester.




-

7

-


1.4


Levels of Study


Each level of your programme involves greater academic challenge and
progressively higher levels of intellectual comprehension and analysis toge
ther with
the application of subject specific and transferable skills. Each successive level also
involves more independent academic activity on the part of the student.


The degree classification is based on level HE5 and level HE6 module grades (see
“Assessment Regulations for the Undergraduate Modular Framework”
-

accessible
via
the following Web link
http://data.bolton.ac.uk/aqas/PDF/PO13_2.pdf
).


See Appendix
4

for further information on
the general
assessment requirements at
each level of study.



Business Management
(Marketing)
Level Descriptors


Level HE4:

At level HE4 students are expected to acquire a good understanding of the basic
principles and fundamental theories and methods of Business Management
(Marketing)
and be able to communicate
clearly about those basics. Discussion and
application of key knowledge and skills will be demonstrated through the study and
solution of a range of problems. By the end of level HE4 students will be able to
demonstrate the development of skills appropriat
e to lifelong learning and have
begun to take responsibility for the nature and quality of outcomes by adopting an
independent approach to their study.


Level HE5:

At level HE5 students are expected to develop analytical skills and demonstrate
evidence of
specialist knowledge. Where opposing explanations or methods of
investigation exist students will demonstrate an understanding of the relative merits
of each by analysing and constructing coherent comparisons of these various
perspectives. The ability to a
pply knowledge and skills will be demonstrated through
the recognition of problems and the development of appropriate investigative
strategies and selection of methods to solve them. By the end of level HE5 students
will demonstrate a greater degree of au
tonomy in their study by taking greater
responsibility for determining and achieving outcomes.


Level HE6:

At level HE6 students are expected to consolidate their understanding of and further
develop their critical orientation to the theories and methods o
f Business
Management

(Marketing)
. They will be expected to assess the adequacy of theories
and methods for the resolution of existing and potential problems. Increasingly
sophisticated judgements about what kinds of evidence are and are not relevant to
ev
aluating complex problems and debates will be required. An ability to integrate new
evidence into the existing body of knowledge will be demonstrated through the critical
use of primary sources in the construction of responses to defined and abstract
probl
ems. By the end of level HE6 students will demonstrate significant autonomy in
their study, accepting accountability for determining and achieving outcomes.


See Appendix 2 for further information on assessment requirements at each level of
study.



-

8

-




1.5

Professional Body or Professional/ Subject Association Accreditation


To qualify for CIM (Chartered Institute of Marketing) exemptions for entry to the CIM
Postgraduate Professional Diploma, graduates must have successfully taken the
following module
s: Marketing Communications, International Marketing, the Project
(on a Marketing topic), Marketing Management and Marketing Strategy. Students
taking the Investigative Study route at level HE6 are likely to be exempted for entry to
the CIM Professional Di
ploma.






1.6


Module Specifications


Full module details can be found on the module database on the Quality Assurance
and Enhancement Unit
via the

University of Bolton
website
:

http://data.bolton.ac.uk/academicaffairs/view_modulelist.asp




-

9

-

2. SUPPORT FOR STUDENTS


2.1

Programme Management and Delivery


Your programme is managed by
Susan Rabbitt
, the
Business Management
(Marketing) Programme Leader.


Your programme of study is delivered by Module Tutors within
the
Faculty of Well
-
Being and Social Sciences
.


A Personal Tutor from the
Business Management
programmes team will be allocated
to you at the start of your course.


2.2

Induction


When you first jo
in the
University

of Bolton as a student
,

you will be provided with an
induction programme. Most of the activities associated with this programme will take
place during your first week with the
University

and are designed to familiarise you
with the
Univer
sity

and provide essential information to ease the uncertainty of being
in a new environment. Induction will also provide you with the opportunity to meet
with programme staff.



2.3


Programme Support


Programme staff
are keen to help to make the time you

spend with them as
academically stimulating and rewarding as possible. Programme staff have a well
deserved reputation for being approachable and being interested in their students‟
progress. They also know from experience that students can, through no fa
ult of their
own, face difficulties that may hinder their capacity to perform to the best of their
ability. It is their aim to make sure they do everything to help such students achieve
their potential despite these difficulties. They will work with studen
ts to tackle these
difficulties and make sure that such difficulties are taken into account in relation to
assessments. They provide a range of support mechanisms for our students
including the following:


Pastoral Support and Guidance:

Your Personal Tutor

is responsible for ensuring
that any personal problems that may affect your ability to study are given due
consideration and that you are given appropriate advice. We strongly advise that you
keep your Personal Tutor informed of any problems you may be ha
ving. Your
Personal Tutor will normally indicate which times of the week she or he is available
for consultation.


-

10

-


Academic Support and Guidance:

Both your Personal Tutor and
Programme

Leader deal with student academic queries or problems that relate to the
requirements of the programme over and above those of individual modules. These
staff will support you in the fulfilment of the module requirements for your
programme.



Module Tutor
s:

These are members of academic staff responsible for the day
-
to
-
day
management of a particular module. Module tutors organise the module teaching
structure, plan and collate module assessments, ensure that all students in the
module are aware of attendan
ce and assessment requirements of the module,
ensure that attendance registers are maintained, and act as the identified individuals
who you can consult if you experience academic problems in the module.



Student Liaison Officer:
Students may draw upon t
he services of the
Faculty

Student Liaison Officer (SLO). The SLO offers a number of services including:



Helping with study skills development
-

essay writing, referencing skills, time

management etc.



Sign
-
posting to other University services.



Providing a
confidential, non judgemental listening service.



Acting as a „bridge‟ between student and
faculties
/tutor.



Feeding back issues raised by students back to
facultie
s.




Sloane Stewart is your dedicated Student Liaison Officer, room M2
-
30.


Student
Services and the Student Centre:

Student Services is based in the
Student Centre, Eagle Mall. The team of Student Advisers offer information, advice
and guidance on a wide range of student support issues. These include
Accommodation, Careers and the Job Sh
op, Chaplaincy, Counselling, Disability,
Enrolment, Volunteering opportunities and Student Finance. They can also refer you
and make appointments for you to see specialist staff.






-

11

-

2.4


Support for
International Students


International Student Welfare
Officer:

The Immigration and Welfare Officer is

on
hand to advise International students on Border Agency/visa issues and to support
their welfare.
The Immigration and Welfare Officer

is located in the Student Centre.


International Society:

The Internatio
nal Society is run by a committee of students
and staff. It aims to bring Bolton's International students and interested UK students
together in a social and recreational environment. As well as organising trips, the
International Society stages social eve
nts including an annual “International
Evening”. You can speak to members of the International Society on week
-
days
between 12.00 and 2.00pm

(term
-
time only) at the reception of the Court Entrance,
Senate House.

See:
www.bolton.ac.uk/International/InternationalSociety.aspx

for further details.



2.
5
Support for Part
-
Time Students


If you are a part
-
time student, you can follow the programme in

the same way as full
-
time students. Part
-
time students receive essentially the same support through the
same systems as full
-
time students, but there are some additional arrangements you
need to be aware of.


As indicated, your attendance is restricted to a maximum of four modules each
academic year. If you take more than that you become liable for full
-
time fees. On the
Business
Management Programme this means that if you stay in part
-
time study
throughout the

course it will take at least 4.5 years to graduat
e
, as opposed to 3
years, for full
-
time students.


The fact that part
-
time students‟ module selection is affected by domestic and work
commitments means that we sometimes have to be more flexible in
relation to the
normal ordering of modules. If you experience problems in relation to this, please
contact your Personal Tutor.


If you experience personal problems which interfere with your academic work, you
should also talk to your Personal Tutor, who w
ill help you resolve any difficulties. If
you decide to change from part
-
time to full
-
time study, you may do so provided you
can maintain yourself and find the fees, and provided you have successfully
completed your studies to date. If you are thinking abo
ut going full
-
time, again you
should discuss the move with your Personal Tutor first.


Please note that there is a Student Adviser, a member of the Student Services team,
based in the Library between 5.00pm and 9.00pm (Mon
-
Thurs) during term
-
time who
can p
rovide you with a wide range of information and support.



2.6

Support for
Students with Disabilities, Learning Difficulties or Specific
Needs


The University of Bolton welcomes students with disabilities and/or additional support
requirement and will make

every effort to support their needs. We will help you to
develop strategies, discover skills and independence by a multi
-
team, student
-
centred approach. We encourage you to work with us to achieve your full potential.



-

12

-

We have contacts with local and n
ational external bodies concerned with inclusion,
disability awareness and disability provision. Advice is provided by the University
Disability Service (see information below) on an individual, strictly confidential basis.



Support for full
-
time and part
-
time students is available through the Disabled
Students Allowance (DSA). Please see the Department for Education and Skills
website:
www.direct.gov.uk
/en/DisabledPeople/EducationAndTraining/HigherEducation/index.
htm
.


If you are not sure whether you qualify for DSA or wish to contact the Student
Disability Service for any other matter, you can telephone 01204 903478 or send an
email to
disabilityinfo@bolton.ac.uk
. Alternatively call into the Student Centre to
make an appointment.


2.
7

Student Representatives and the Programme Committee


In relation to the management of the programme, you wil
l be represented by your
year‟s elected representative on the
Business Management
Programmes Committee,
the body responsible for planning and monitoring the operation of the
business
management
programmes. As well as student representatives, this committee

comprises the
Business Management
Programmes

Leader (Chair), module tutors
and representatives from

the

Library.

The proceedings of the
Business Management
Programme Committee are reported to
the
Faculty of Well
-
Being and Social
Sciences
Board of Study.


Matters raised by student representatives are always an item of business on the
Programme Committee agenda.
Minutes are available in
Faculty of Well
-
Being and
Social Sciences
area of the website. Information on what we are doing about issues
raised by stud
ents may be found in
these minutes and from Student Representatives.
Elections for representatives are held early in semester one. (Also see section 7
Student Feedback)


2.8

Mitigating Circumstances


Sometimes circumstances

happen outside your control that may affect your
performance or your ability to submit assessments or sit examinations. It is important
that you read the procedures for submitting requests for consideration of mitigating
circumstances.


Requests for consi
deration of
foreseen
mitigating circumstances should be
submitted
no later than 5 working days

prior
to

the last relevant assessment
to give
sufficient
time for administration and

Panel consideration.



Un
foreseen

mitigating Circumstances requests should submitted no later than
5
days
after the last relevant assessment.


It is important that requests are
accompanied by
relevant documentary evidence
.
Full details of the procedures are available via the “Policies an
d Procedures” section
of the “Current Students” portal on the University
website:

http://www.bolton.ac.uk/Students/PoliciesProceduresRegulations/StudentsOnTaught
Courses/ExamRegulationsAndProcedures/pdf/MitCircs.pdf.


It is advisable, where possible to
su
bmit written support from you
r Personal Tutor

or

-

13

-

Student Liaison Officer
before submitting mitigating circumstances documentation.




2.9


Complaints

The University has a formal complaints procedure, and full details can be found on
the intranet via the
„Policies and Procedures‟ section on the „Current Students‟ portal.



You may wish to initially explore an informal approach by discussing the matter
directly with the person concerned, e.g. the Module Tutor or
Programme

Leader. You
may also wish to contact the Principal Lecturer for Quality (see section
2.3
)

or the
Dean of Faculty
.


I
f you are not satisfied with the response from your
Faculty

you can access the
formal procedures by completing a Student Complaints Form (a
vailable to download
from the “P
olicy and Procedures” Web page:

http://www.bolton.ac.uk/Students/PoliciesProceduresRegulations/Home.aspx

or by writing to the Quality Ass
urance and Enhancement Coordinator in the Quality
Assurance and Enhancement Unit.



-

14

-



3.


ACCOMMODATION AND COMMUNICATION


3.1


Accommodation

The offices of staff in the
Faculty of Well
-
Being and Social Sciences


Business
team
are accommodated in
the Business
and
Management Centre (M
-
block) and on C2.

Teaching rooms are located in

the Business and Management Centre (M
-
block)
, D
-
Block and Eagle Tower.


Timetables showing the appropriate room numbers and facilities for each module are
displayed at th
e beginning of each semester
on the programme notice board located
in
the Business and Management Centre (M
-
block).


3.2 Opening Hours of Relevant Offices


The location and opening times (term time) of relevant offices are detailed below:


Office

Location

Telephone No.

Opening Hours

Faculty

Office

-

Business


C
-

Block

(C2
-
13)

01204 903111


Monday


Friday

8.45
am


5.00
pm

Student Centre

Chancellors Mall

01204 903733

Monday


Friday

8.45am


5:00 pm

Adviser available in the
Library:

Monday


Thursday

5.00pm
-

9.00pm

Careers Centre and Job
Shop


Chancellors Mall

01204 903083

Refer to notice outside
facility

Library

Chancellors Mall

01204 903094

Monday


Thursday

8.45am
-

9.00pm

Friday

8.45am
-

5.00pm

Saturday

9.30am
-

12.30pm

24 Hour Access
Computing
Room

Above the Social
Learning Zone



01204 903563

(Help desk)

Monday


Sunday:

24 Hours

Deane Deli


Café

Business and
Management
Centre

(M
-
Block)


Monday

-

Thursday

8.
30am
-

8.00pm

Friday

8.30am
-

4.00pm

Sports Centre

Deane

01204 903172

Monday


Friday

10.00am


10:00 pm

Saturday

10:00am


5:00pm

Sunday

1
2
:00am


8:00pm

Student Union


Chancellors Mall

01204 900850


SU Office:

Monday


Friday:

9.00
am


5.00
pm




-

15

-


3.3

Communication Systems


Good communication between staff and students is important to make sure
everything runs smoothly and to fix things quickly and effectively when they don‟t.
Good communication on a one
-
to
-
one basis is also important to make sure individual
student needs are

addressed and met.


Communication to individual students is usually through
University
e
-
mail. In some
cases letters may be sent to your
local
address. The notice boards located
on the
ground floor of M
-
Block

will also contain important information and y
ou should check
these regularly.


Most

module tutors may post announcements through
Moodle,

the student virtual
learning environment (VLE)
. It is important therefore that you familiarise yourself with
how to access this electronic information.

In any case
, students will be given tuition
to aid in the use of Moodle.
You will find that general information about the
programme may sometimes be communicated to students in the module sessions

and via email
.

Website:

http://elearning.bolton.ac.uk/



Please
ensure that you:




regularly check your University e
-
mail address




regularly scan the notice boards to make sure you are aware of important
events, changes etc.;




check that any changes to your personal details are updated on the University
database via the
University website
:

www.bolton.ac.uk/Students/MyDetails/Home.aspx



Useful Web addresses inclu
de:


Library:
www.bolton.ac.uk/library


Student Services:

www.bolton.ac.uk/Students/AdviceAndSupport/StudentServices/Openingtimes.aspx


N.B. You should be aware that a strict policy regarding e
-
mail abuse is in force at the
University

and anyone found sending offensive or defamatory messages will be
facing discip
linary action up to and including expulsion (in addition to any criminal or
civil action which may be pursued by affected parties).




-

16

-


3.4

Contacting Staff

The best way to contact staff outside lecture time is by email. If further discussion is
required,
you may arrange a mutually convenient appointment. Staff will endeavour
to respond to your emails within 3 working days. However, their response may be
constrained by other work demands or annual leave.




3.5

Key Personnel

A list of key contacts for students

on your programme of study is provided below:


Staff Name

Position

Location

Telephone
No.

E
-
mail


Mary Barden



Bob Barrett





Dr Margaret
Boneham


Sara Burgess




Jean Phillips



Susan Rabbitt




Sloane
Stewart


Various


Librarian

-

Business



Academic

Manager
-

Business




Dean of Faculty



Head of Student
Services



Programmes
Administrator


Business Management
(Marketing)
Programme
Leader


Student Liaison Officer


International Society



Eagle
Library


C2
-
11





T3
-
58a



Student
Centre



C2
-
13


M2
-
33



M2
-
30




01204
903547



01204
903137



01204
903
759




01204
903482




01204
903136


01204
903
463




01204
903259



meb2@bolton.ac.uk




rwb1@bolton.ac.uk






mb3@bolton.ac.uk




seb1@bolton.ac.uk





jcp1@bolton.ac.uk



sr8@bolton.ac.uk




sis1@bolton.ac.uk



International
-
society@bolton.ac.uk



A list of key contacts for students on your programme of study is provided below:

Contact details for oth
er
University

personnel may

be

obtained from the
University

switchboard (01204 90
060
0) or by clicking on the “To” button when selecting “New”
message on the
University

email system.

-

17

-

4.

TEACHING AND LEARNING


4.1

Teaching and Learning Methods


A variety of
teaching and learning methods are employed throughout the programme
in order to ensure the acquisition and development of appropriate concepts,
knowledge and skills. Some of these you will experience during formally timetabled
classes with a module tutor.
Others you may adopt personally to facilitate your own
learning.


It is important to realise that the time spent with a tutor during formally timetabled
classes is only a small part of the learning time identified for a module. In addition to
the contact t
ime with lecturers, a significant amount of personal study should be
undertaken.

It is advisable to allow at least 5
-
7 hours of personal study time, per
week for each 20 credit module.
This personal study time should be spent, for
example, engaging in ge
neral background reading, preparing for seminar activities,
working on assignments or revising for examinations.

Early in your studies guidance
will be provided as to how you can make best use of this time. As you progress
through your programme however, t
his guidance will become less structured and
prescriptive. By the third year of your programme it is expected that you will
demonstrate significant independence in your study taking responsibility for the
management of your own learning time.


The methods
described below are the ones most commonly employed by tutors
during your time in the classroom. However, individual module tutors are free to
introduce techniques that they view as especially suitable in aiding learning in their
specialist area. (See
Modu
le Guides

for specific teaching and learning strategies)


Lectures:

Lectures play an important part throughout the course and will feature in a
number of modules. They involve the dissemination of theoretical and empirical
information by a lecturer and pr
ovide a basic framework that students can build upon
through their reading and through other classroom activities.




Seminars:

Seminars involve groups of students who meet with a tutor to discuss
further reading, issues and problems arising from lecture material, or to undertake
case studies or problem
-
solving exercises. It is common for further reading on a
particular topic to b
e assigned, and one student may be required to present an oral
synopsis to provide a basis for discussion. Seminars play an important part in
encouraging students to think critically about the subject, to analyse theory and
information in a systematic fash
ion, and to enhance understanding of conceptual
issues.


-

18

-


Skills
Workshops:

Workshops are also employed in some modules and may involve
the development of skills e.g. research methods, the application of statistics,
presentations etc, as well as problem sol
ving through the evaluation of case
-
study
material. Workshop sessions are also an important element of the preparation for the
work placement period. General assistance with assignment work may be offered in
workshops, and they play an important part in in
creasing students‟ confidence in
dealing with the subject matter.


Work
-
Based Learning:

This
delivery
method of teaching and learning will be
facilitated through

periods working directly with industry involving work
-
based
learning and work placement, where

theory and knowledge accumulated will be
applied and put into practice within real organisational settings within Industry.


Tutorials:


A tutorial is a period of time devoted to a student individually, usually by
the module tutor, to focus on a particul
ar area or topic.

These are usually individually
based but may be shared with students who are studying a similar area/issue.
Students should prepare for tutorials, which are usually associated with an
assignment, by bringing any plans for discussion.


Ot
her teaching and l
earning methods:

These
may

include site visits

to
organisations

and guest speakers.






Informal Group Study Sessions:

Laptops can be booked out from the library issue
desk and used for group work in the Social Learning Zone. Furthermore, there are a

-

19

-

number of group study rooms in the library can also be booked for meetings and/or
presentation practice.


4.2 Personal
Development Planning and Professional Skills

Throughout your programme you will be encouraged to reflect on the development of
your academic and professional skills, and make recommendations for self
-
improvement as a result of this. Specifically this abili
ty to appraise your performance
and set targets will be developed
Management Skills at HE4, Work Experience at
HE5 and the Project Module
/Investigative Study

in HE6.


4.3 Information Literacy

The
U
niversity is committed to helping you graduate as an „infor
mation literate‟
person. This means that you will be able to identify, locate and retrieve standard
(subject) and other material in printed and electronic form, using appropriate
resources

by the library and your subject area
. You will be able to synthesi
se and
present retrieved materials in ways appropriate to the task in hand.

Throughout your
programme, you will be given every opportunity to develop your skills in this area,
through workshops, seminars, tutorials and self
-
directed learning.


4.
4

Module A
ssessment and Methods

Assessment serves several functions. The obvious and primary function is to
evaluate student achievement. However, assessment also serves to help
students

organise and develop
their

learning. Feedback from assessment serves an importa
nt
educational function and can help
students

develop
their

skills and understanding of
their

own strengths and weaknesses.


A range of assessments are employed on the programme, including essays, reports,
seminar papers, portfolios, presentations and exa
minations (see Appendix 4).


Essay
s
:

For a number of modules, students will be required to produce a
coursework essay or essays. Essays assess understanding of the thrust of the
question set, whether you have introduced and appreciate the relevance of
a
ppropriate material to the topic in hand and understand its implications, whether you
can analyse and evaluate information and whether you can communicate your ideas
clearly. Coursework essays are typically set to assess the learning outcomes related
to un
derstanding key concepts, demonstrating critical evaluations, and demonstrating
the capacity to think independently. The required length of coursework essays can
vary depending upon the purpose of the assignment for which the work is assessed.
You will be
given guidance by the teaching staff on any specific requirements.


Reports:

A number of modules require the student to write reports, which are
sometimes based on a given case
-
study. These reports identify published
background research and rationale for their study, the way in which the study was
carried out, and the results and
analysis of information. Usually, a standard format is
used to aid clear, precise and unambiguous expression. Students are given explicit
guidance on the format required for the report.


Presentations:

Students are required to make oral presentations (e.g
. from notes or
from an essay, using presentational aids where appropriate) in a number of modules.
Some modules may specify such a presentation as part of their assessment, whilst
seminar presentations in other modules may not be part of the formal assess
ment.




-

20

-

Skills Portfolios:
As part of “skills rich modules” students will be required to compile
a portfolio which provides evidence of communication, numera
c
y and ICT skills.
Whilst portfolios are not graded they will need to be completed satisfactorily in order
to pass the module overall.


Examinations:

A number of modules will require you to sit an examination. Different
examinations take different formats
and it is important that you check with your
Module Tutor the question format and what materials if any can be taken into the
examination room.


The assessment methods for each module are identified in the Module
Guides
given
out at the beginning of the te
aching period. The
M
odule
Guides
also provide
information on assignment submission dates and will allow you plan your work load
effectively.



4.
5

Learning Opportunities Overseas


Work Placement:
This will usually take place in the fourth semester of your
programme. In the first 7 weeks of the semester a number of class room based
sessions will take place to prepare you for your work experience. These will be in the
form of lectures, workshops and tutorials. Areas covered will include writing an
effective C
V and letters of application, job searching techniques, as well as language
support for applications in non
-
English speaking countries.


Study Abroad:
You are also given the opportunity to enhance your language/study
skills through study at one of our part
ner institutions


currently these are located in
France, Germany, Spain, Slovakia and Finland. This

option is available for full
-
time
students in the forth or fifth semester of the programme. Additional funding is usually
available for those taking part i
n the Erasmus programme (European partners only).


-

21

-

5.

ASSESSMENT


Important information on assessment regulations and other information on
assessment (including marking criteria and definitions of grade descriptions) are
contained in the Assessment Regulat
ions for the Undergraduate Modular Framework
documents
.


Please ensure that you read and understand this information. It will be assumed that
you are familiar with the Assessment Regulations for the Undergraduate Modular
Framework.


Further details of the Assessment Regulations for Undergraduate Modular
Programmes can be viewed via the University of Bolton website:
http://www.bolton.ac.uk/Quality/QAEContents/APPR/Documents/pdf/AssessmentRegulations
forUndergraduateModularProgrammes(MainDocument).pdf


5.1

Assessment Strategy

The assessment strategy for the programme is designed to ensure t
hat students
achieve the overall aims and learning outcomes of the programme, as well as the
learning outcomes for individual modules. Appendix 5 illustrates the mix of
assessment methods which allows students to develop their intellectual capabilities,
as

well as key transferable skills.


5.2

Assessment Criteria

Specific criteria within modules will vary from assignment to assignment and will be
made clear to you before you embark on any task. In addition to these module
specific criteria, there are a set

of general assessment criteria for the Modular
Programme Scheme, which will also apply. The assessment criteria are described in
the Assessment Regulations for the Undergraduate Modular Framework and are
repeated here as follows:



Grade Description


Mar
k

Hons Degree Classification




Work of Exceptional

High

80+

I


Quality

Medium

75
-
78



Low

70
-
74

I



Work of Very Good

High


67
-
68



II.I


Quality

Medium

64
-
66

II.I



Low

60
-
63

II.I




Work of Good Quality

High

57
-
58

II.II



Medium

54
-
56

II.II



Low

50
-
53

II.II



Work of Satisfactory

High

47
-
48

III


Quality

Medium

44
-
46

III



Low

40
-
43

III



Unsatisfactory

Borderline Fail

35
-
38

BF


Performance (Fail)

Clear Fail

below 35

F



-

22

-

5.3 Guidelines for the Preparation and Submission of Assignments:


1.

Assignments should be word
-
processed in Arial 12 point font, be double
-
spaced, on
A4 size paper. Writing should appear on only one side of the paper, be fully justified
and with each page being numbered in the footer, numbering to be centred.


2.

There should be a title page detailing the programme, module title, assignment title,
student number, marking tutor and date of submission.
Do not put your name on
the assignment
. It is good practice to put your student number in the top left hand
side of
the header of each page, and the date of submission in the top right.


3.


You are expected to revise and edit your assignment to remain within +/
-

10% of the
indicative word length outlined in the Module Guide. In order to ensure that word
counts can easily
be checked
you should include a note of the word count

as
identified by your word processing package. A deduction should be made from this
figure for all tables, figures, quotations, appendices and references which DO NOT
count towards the overall word li
mit.


Students who exceed a specified
indicative word length

for a written assignment will
be subject to the following penalty system:




Up to 10% over the specified
indicative word length

= no penalty




10


20% over the specified indicative word length =
5 marks subtracted
(However if the assignment would normally gain a pass mark, then the final
mark will be not be less than 40%).




More than 20% over the indicative word length = maximum 40%.


Assignments shorter than the indicative word length will not
have marks deducted
(even if these are more than 10% short). However, it is likely to be an exceptional
piece of work that covers the assignment requirements fully in much less than the set
word count less 10%.


Full details of “
Penalties for Exceeding Spe
cified Word Limits in Written Assignments”
are available via the “Policies and Procedures” section of the “Current Students”
portal on the University intranet.



4.

All written work must be referenced using the Harvard System, full details of which
are avail
able from the Library website:


http://data.bolton.ac.uk/bissto/infoskills/useinfo/cite/harvard/index.htm


5.

Unless otherwise notified by your module tutor, hard copies of assignments should
be placed with a white general cover sheet, in the Assignment Post
-
box next to the
Faculty Office
-

Business
.


Please note

that all assignments are date stamped by the
Facul
ty
Office once they
have been taken out of the post
-
box. It is
this

date stamp which is taken into account
(rather than the date stamp which students make themselves on the general cover
sheet).



-

23

-

Electronic copies of assignments will usually be requested

via “Turn
-
it
-
in”. Please
ensure you follow the instructions provided by your module tutor and on the
assessment brief.


Assignments may be submitted on or before the published submission date.
Assignments not available at this time will be considered late

unless an extension
has been previously agreed.


Penalties for late submission of coursework are:


Students who fail to submit assessments by the specified date (without an extension
being granted or without accepted Mitigating Circumstances) will be subj
ect to the
following penalties:




Up to 5 calendar days late = 10 marks subtracted but if the assignment would
normally gain a pass mark, then the final mark to be no lower than 40%.




Up to 10 calendar days late = 20 marks subtracted but if the assignment w
ould
normally gain a pass mark, then the final mark to be no lower than 40%.




More than 10 calendar days late =
1

mark awarded.


Please note that it is your responsibility to ensure that the assignment is submitted in
the format/s specified in the Module

Guide or on the Assessment Brief.


YOU SHOULD
ALWAYS

ENSURE YOU KEEP A COPY OF ANY ASSIGNMENT
SUBMITTED BY WHATEVER METHOD


Full details of “
Penalties for the Late Submission of Assessed Work”

are available via
the “Policies and Procedures” section of the

“Current Students” portal on the
University intranet.


6.

In the case of exceptional and unforeseen circumstances, an extension of up to 5
days after the assessment submission deadline may be granted by your Programme
Leader. You should complete an Extension

Request Form available from the
Faculty

Office and attach documentary evidence of your circumstances, prior to the
published submission deadline.


Requests for extensions for periods longer than 5 days must be made using the
Mitigating Circumstances proce
dures (see section 2.5).






-

24

-

5.4

Procedures for Examinations


1.

Examinations are normally held during the final week of each semester. Resit
examinations are normally held in May and September. Exam timetables are posted
on the University Web pages and on notice boards well in advance of the exam
period.


It is your responsibility to note the dates of any examination, including resit
examinations and ensure that you are available to take them.


Please note that

we do not accept holiday bookings as a legitimate reason for
missing an examination.


2.

Examinati
ons take a variety of forms. Please ensure you check the format of your
examination in advance.


3.

It is important that you prepare fully for examinations. Revision slots are indicated
on your module calendar and on “Make
-
good
-
sheets”. Failure to attend the
se and
other timetabled sessions will seriously jeopardise your success in examinations.


4.

You will need to check the room location and equipment requirements in
advance. Please ensure that you reach the examination room
at least 15 minutes
prior to the tim
etabled start
.


5.

If you require any special examination arrangements to be made
, such as extra
time as the result of a special need,

please ensure that your Module Tutor and the
Faculty

Office are made aware of these well in advance.


5.5

Moderation of Mar
ks

There is a robust system of moderation in place for ensuring the quality and
consistency of marking both within modules and between them. For each assignment
submitted the identified marking tutor first marks the scripts. A sample equating to
approximately

the square root of the module cohort (e.g. 5 scripts selected from a
cohort of 25 students) is selected, representative of the range of marks awarded. A
second tutor then marks this sample.


This second marking is normally undertaken without sight of the

first marking tutor‟s
summary comments or knowledge of the mark awarded, although where the script
has been annotated, the second marker would have sight of these annotations. The
two sets of marks are then compared and, if in close agreement, a final mod
erated
mark determined. If the two sets of marks are significantly different then further action
is agreed which may require the whole cohort of scripts being remarked.


A similar sample of assignment scripts is then sent to the external examiner for
furt
her moderation. In most cases this sample would be the same as that which had
been internally moderated. However where time is limited internal and external
moderation may have to occur in tandem. In this case, two samples would be
selected, one for intern
al moderation and one for external moderation. The external
examiner‟s comments are taken into account at the relevant programme examination
board at which time any further adjustment of the assignment marks is agreed.


In the case of final year projects,
all are
i
nternally moderated and a sample externally
moderated.


-

25

-


5.6 Feedback on
Assessments

The programme team will aim to mark your work within
15 working days
.

Please be patient when awaiting feedback for marked work; we pride ourselves on
the thoroughn
ess of our marking and this is therefore a time
-
consuming activity.


When your marked
work

is returned to you it will be accompanied by
written and,
where possible, verbal
feedback which will help you to understand the rationale for
the mark achieved, and
also help you improve your performance in future
assignments.


If you have failed the

ass
essment,
this feedback will be especially important, as you
will have to rectify any shortcomings if you are given a referral assignment. The
referral assignment
may be different from the original, failed assignment.


5.7

Referencing

In any coursework assessment it is essential you clarify your sources of information
in the appropriate manner.


It is important that you cite sources throughout the main body of tex
t
whether or not
they are directly quoted.

At the end of the assignment, you should then provide a
complete reference list of all materials referred to in the text. Your reference list
should only refer to sources explicitly referred to in the text.


Further information on the details of referencing can be found on the

Library

website:

http://data.bolton.ac.uk/bissto/infoskills/useinfo/cite/harvard/index.htm


Your P
ersonal Tutor and/or Module Tutors will be happy to provide clarification and
explanation of the leaflet if required. It is your responsibility to ensure that all
references used in the text of your coursework are properly referenced and
acknowledged.



5.
8
Use of Unfair Means


The
University

has a responsibility to ensure that the standards of its awards are
maintained and that its qualifications are not achieved through the use of unfair
means. The regulations on the Use of Unfair Means in Assessment cov
er not only
students who deliberately set out to cheat e.g. by taking unauthorised material into
exams, but also those who do not follow normal academic rules, e.g.
by failing to
acknowledge the
ideas of others through proper referencing.


Unfair means includes
plagiarism

(giving the impression that you have written or
thought something when you have borrowed it from someone else),
collusion

(working collaboratively with another student and then submitting the work as all your
own work), and

cheating
in examinations.


You should familiarise yourself at the earliest opportunity with the University‟s Unfair
Means Regulations which are available via the “Policies and Procedures” section of
the “Current Students” portal on the University intrane
t. You can also get on
-
line help
about avoiding plagiarism through BISSTO available via Library‟s website:

www.bolton.ac.uk/library





-

26

-

5.
9

Publication of Results

and Awards Ce
remonies

Following the Programme Assessment Boards in September, February and June,
you will be able to access your results via “Current Students” and “My Details” on the
University web pages:

See
https://evision.bolton.ac.uk/urd/sits.urd/run/SIW_LGN
.


Please note that these results are provisional until they have been ratified by the
Faculty

Awards/Progression Boards. Please ensure you check your University email
address for details of rat
ified results and any make
-
good work.


The Awards Ceremon
y

take
s

place in July (see the Academic Calendar for further
details
).

Potential finalists will be sent an invitation to the July Ceremony in April.


5.1
0

Requests for reviews of decisions of boards of examiners (Appeals)

The University
‟s regulations

set out a number

of grounds on which you can ask for a
review of an assessment decision.


These include:



illness or some other factor which affected your

performance but which
you were unwilling or unable to divulge before the Assessment Board
made its decision;



a material administrative error, the assessments were not conducted in
accordance with the
University
‟s regulations, or some other
irregularity;



the decision of an Assessment Board about the use of unfair means or
the consequent academic action is unreasonably severe.



The grounds
do not

include questioning the academic judgment of an Assessment
Board.



You can request

a review of an Assessment Board decision by writing to the
Secretary to the Academic Board in the Quality Assurance and Enhancement Unit,
giving reasons and including supporting evidence within 14 days of publication of the
Assessment Board‟s decision.




Full details of the Appeals procedures are available via the University website:

http://www.bolton.ac.uk/Quality/QAEContents/APPR/Documents/pdf/AppealsRegPro
c2009
-
10(ExExamTaught).pdf






6.


ATTENDANCE AND WITHDRAWAL


You

are responsible for attending all learning and teaching sessions associated

with
your programme of study.


-

27

-


You should notify your Module Tutor/s

in advance
if you

expect to be
absent from
timetabled session. P
rior permission
must be obtained
from
your Programme Leader
for planned absences for two

or more days during term time.


In relation to unplanned absences, you should contact your Module Tutor within 24
hours of the missed

session/s.

.

If you fail to explain any absences, you may be contacted by
Faculty

Staff. We will

endeavour

to help you if your absence is due to mitigating circumstances.


A student may be asked to supply documentary evidence to justify their absence.
W
here there is no valid reason for unsatisfactory attendance,
a student

may be
issued with a formal written warning. Furthermore a formal report on a student‟s
attendance may be made to the student‟s sponsor, including an employer, the Local
Authority

and/o
r

the Student Loan Company
.



A student who
fails to

respond to warnings about their attendance may be required to
enter into a formal Attendance Agreement
. Such students
may be withdrawn from
their programme if they breach the terms of their Attendance Ag
reement.


In accordance with UK immigration law, a report will be made to the UK Border
Agency, if an International student holding a student visa is absent from the
University for more than 10 working days without
authorisation.


Full details of the
“Stud
ent Attendance Policy”

are available via the “Policies and
Procedures” section of the “Current Students” portal on the University intranet
.



7.

STUDENT FEEDBACK


All students have the opportunity to contribute to the monitoring and enhancement of
their course of study. You can approach your
M
odule
T
utor,
Programme

Leader/Personal Tutor or the
Academic Manager


Business
on an informal level to
discuss issues. The P
rogramme Committee is also an important forum at which
elected Student Representatives can speak on behalf of their peers. Student
representatives for the Programme Committee are elected at the beginning of each
academic year and are requested to convene s
tudent meetings where issues for the
Programme Committee meetings can be raised and discussed. All Student
Representatives receive formal training from the Students Union.


In addition to the Programme Committee system you are required to complete a
modul
e feedback form for each module in each semester. Furthermore, at least once
in your programme you will be requested to complete a programme questionnaire.
Survey feedback is important as it is used by the Programme Team and central

services to enhance the

quality of provision and improve the student learning
experience
.









-

28

-

8.

HEALTH AND SAFETY AND WELFARE


8.1 Evacuation


If the evacuation alarm sounds you should immediately stop what you are doing and
evacuate by the nearest convenient exit. If you ha
ve a disability that may make your
evacuation difficult, please mention this confidentially to your tutors.



8.2 Use of Computers


General guidance on the safe use of computers will be given to you as appropriate at
induction and you should at all times
follow this guidance. In particular you must:




Not use the computers for longer than 90 minutes at a time without a 15
minute complete break from the screen




You should preferably plan your work to enable you to have shorter sessions
such as 30 minutes fol
lowed by 5 minutes of change or 60 minutes followed
by 10 minutes of change.




You should plan your work so that you do not use the computer for longer than
3 hours a day with at least a day‟s break in between.


8.3 Student Welfare


If you have something on

your mind that is worrying you or causing you concern it is
often better to talk to someone about it. You may choose to talk to a friend, a relation,
the Students' Union or a member of staff
-

one of your lecturers or tutors. However, if
you feel the need

to speak to someone who is not involved in your personal life or
academic work, you can arrange to see an experienced University Counsellor.


Details on how to contact the
University

Counse
l
ling Service can be found on the
follo
w
ing
W
eb

page:

http://www.bolton.ac.uk/Students/AdviceAndSupport/Counselling/Home.aspx



9. STUDENT DISCIPLINE


The
University

has a disciplinary procedure which relates to
complaints about
unacceptable
behaviour of students. This

p
rocedure can be accessed via the
“Pol
icies and Procedures” section of the “Current Students” portal on the
University

intranet.






-

29

-

Appendices


-

30

-

Appendix 1:
PROGRAMME SPECIFICAT
ION


1. Qualification

BA (HONS)

2. Programme Title

Business Management

(Marketing)

3. UCAS Code

N5
00

BA/
Mkt

4.
Programme Type

Modular


Single

Full and part time

5. Main Purposes and Distinctive Features

of the Programme



To develop focussed multi
-
disciplinary knowledge and understanding of Business Management

and
Marketing
.



To provide the opportunity to develop knowledge and understanding of Business Management
and
Marketing
in a vocational context.



To develop skills necessary for investigation of Business Management
and
Marketing
problems.



To develop transferable skills for
use in the workplace.



To develop a positive disposition towards, and the skills for, lifelong learning.



Through Personal Development Planning (PDP), to develop the skills to plan for personal, educational
and career development.


Special

Features



Opportunity to enhance career prospects.



Opportunity to apply knowledge gained in work situations.



Opportunity to choose either the Project or an Investigative Study at Level 3.


6. What a graduate should know and be able to do on completion of
the programme

To gain the qualification the learner will have demonstrated:



Subject knowledge and understanding



Cognitive skills



Discipline
-
related practical and professional skills and



Other general skills and capabilities (eg key/transferable/common) as
specified in the learning
objectives/outcomes for approved modules in the programme. Further details of module outcomes can be
found in the programme document.

Knowledge and understanding in the context of the
subject(s)

i) Understand fundamental business

and management
concepts, principles and techniques

in a Marketing context.

ii) Awareness of the major theoretical and practical aspects
central to the various disciplines.

iii) Understand the relationship between the various
disciplines involved.

iv) Deve
lop an understanding of the limitations of the body
of knowledge with regard to business.


Cognitive skills in the context of the subject(s)

i) The capacity for critical reasoning and analysis.

ii) Synthesis of data/information and interpretation of
find
ings.

iii) Application of concepts.

iv) Identification and solving of problems.

v) Discrimination between and evaluation of theories.

vi) Plan, conduct and report a piece of original research
based on student work experience.



Subject
-
specific practical/p
rofessional skills

i) Competence in use of quantitative and qualitative
research methods.

ii) Communicating in a manner expected of a
business professional.

iii) Application of current knowledge, skills,
techniques and commercial awareness expected of
a
business professional.

iv)Appraise own needs for academic, personal and
professional development and make
recommendations (Personal Development Planning)


Other skills (e.g. key/transferable) developed in
subject or other contexts

i) Capacity to learn and

investigate.

ii) Communicate effectively both orally and in writing.

iii) Numerical and quantitative skills appropriate for
business use.

iv) Ability to work independently or as part of a team.

v) Competent in the use of information technology.

vi) Skills

to plan for personal, educational and career
development

7. Qualities, Skills & Capabilities Profile
The education and training goals of the programme seek to develop and
demonstrate the following qualities, skills, capabilities and values in its graduat
es.

A Cognitive

B Practical

C Personal & Social

D Other

Critical Reasoning

Research Skills

Independence/Self reliance

Awareness and
understanding of
contemporary
business issues

Powers of analysis

Variety of IT related skills

Self motivation

Integration/synthesis of
knowledge

Writing skills


Organisation and time
management


Applied and theoretical
problem solving

Vocational skills

Teamwork



Understanding/application of
concepts and theory

Oral communication
skills

Enterprise

and
resourcefulness




Learning skills

Communication skills

Networking and an
appreciation of other people‟s
working environments




Personal Development


-

31

-

Planning

8. Duration and Structure of Programme/Modes of Study/Credit Volume of Study Units

(3
Years full
-
time; 4½
-
5 years part
-
time). Honours Degree = 360 credits; Intermediate Awards of Diploma of
Higher Education and Certificate of Higher Education available at 240 and 120 credits respectively. All Honours
degrees must include the study of 120
credits at Level H3/(HE6).

Part II

Students take

12

Modules


Core Modules

Options

Project



HE6
Honours

Modules



Strategic Management


Contemporary

Management Issues


Marketing Management

Marketing Strategy and/or

Buying Behaviour


Project

(40 credits)


or Investigative
Study (20 credits)



HE5
Honours
Modules


Financial Decision
-
making
for Business Managers

Managing Organisational
Behaviour

Research Methods

Work Experience

International Marketing

Marketing Communications




Part 1

Students take 6 (Single) M
o
dules


HE4
Honours
Modules


Management Skills

Managing People

Principles of Marketing

Business Finance

Business Environment

Introduction to Services
Marketing






9. Learning, Teaching and Assessment
Strategy

Learning and
Teaching Methods

A range of teaching and learning methods
will be used: Lectures, Seminars, Tutorials,
Case Study Analysis, IT Practicals, and
Supported Self Study.


Assessment Methods

Assessment is linked to the learning
outcomes of each module. Assessmen
t
methods will include: assignments, reports,
case study analysis, both open and closed
book examinations and a Project.


Assessment Classification System

The pass mark for individual assessments
is 40%, however, if any assessment for a
module achieve a ma
rk of at least 35% but
the overall mean mark exceeds 40%, this
will be regarded as a pass mark overall.

Final degree classification will be based on
30% weighting of H2/(HE5) and 70% of
H3/(HE6).


Honours Classification Bands

70%
-

above First Class

60
-
69%
Upper
Second Class

50
-
59% Lower Second
Class

40
-
49% Third Class

35
-
39%
Borderline Fail

Below 35% Clear Fail

10. Other Information

(including compliance with relevant
University policies)


Date programme first offered

September 2008


Admissions Criteria

Sta
ndard Requirements



Normally 5 GCSE/GCE passes (including English) with

2 GCE
A/AS level passes with 26
0 UCAS points or



Vocational Certificate of Education (VCE) double award with 220
points (C,D), or



Edexcel/BTEC National Diploma/Certificate, with an
average of
Merits, or



Other equivalent qualifications, such as Scottish Higher passes,
the Irish Leaving Certificate or International Baccalaureate



Holders of a relevant HND/C will be considered for exemption
from part 1 and direct entry into part II to st
udy an appropriate
number of modules to „top
-
up‟ their qualification to a degree


Non Standard Entry



Pass in a Kite
-
marked Access to Higher Education course,
relevant work experience, and over 21 years.



Mature student evaluation may include an interview a
nd /or a
diagnostic test


Indicators of Quality and Standards

External Examiner monitoring

Benchmarking with similar programmes

National benchmark standards



-

29

-

APPENDIX 2: GENERAL
ASSESSMENT CRITERIA


Level HE4



Relevance

Knowledge

Argument/Analysis

Structure

Presentation

Written English

Research/Referencing

Class I

(Exceptional

Quality)

80%+

As for Class 1(70
-
79%) but exceptional

work that makes a contribution to the development of knowledge and understanding in the subject area


70
-
79%


Directly relevant to title.
Addresses most or all of
the implications and
assumptions of the title.

Demonstrates a
comprehensive knowledge of
theory and practice for this
level. Demonstrates ability in
the manipulation and transfer
of subject material to
demonstrate a solid
understanding of the issues.

Makes creative use of appropriate
arguments and/or theoretical
models. Contains some distincti
ve
or independent thinking.

A comprehensive discussion of
the material resulting in clear,
logical conclusions.

Coherently
articulated and
logically structured.

An appropriate
format is used.

The presentational
style & layout is correct
for the type of
assignment.

Effective inclusion of
figures, tables, plates
(FTP).



A very well written

answer with standard
spelling and grammar.

Style is clear, resourceful
and academic.


All sources accurately
cited in the text. A
comprehensive
reference list in
Harva
rd Style is
provided.

Class II/i

(Very Good
Quality)

60
-
69%

Directly relevant to title.

Addresses some of the
implications of the
issues addressed by the
title.

Demonstrates a sound
knowledge of theory and
practice for this level.
Manipulates and
transfers
some material to demonstrate
a clear grasp of the themes,
questions and issues.

Uses appropriate arguments or
theoretical models.

Clear and valid discussion of the
material. Clear, logical
conclusions.

For the most part
coherently
articulated and

logically constructed.

An appropriate
format is used.

The presentational
style & layout is correct
for the type of
assignment.

Effective inclusion of
FTP.

Well written with

standard spelling and
grammar. Style is clear
and academic.


All sources accurat
ely
cited in the text and an
appropriate reference
list in Harvard Style is
provided.

Class II/ii

(Good
Quality)


50
-
59%

Generally addresses
the title and its
implications, but
sometimes addresses
irrelevant issues.

Demonstrates an adequate
knowledge of
theory and
practice for this level, with
evidence of an appreciation of
its significance.

Provides a partly coherent
argument, but lacking clear focus
and consistency in places. Some
issues lack clarity, or theoretical
models expressed in simplistic
terms.

Conclusions are fairly clear and
logical.

Adequate attempt at
articulation and
logical structure.

An acceptable
format is used.

The presentational
style & layout is correct
for the type of
assignment.

Inclusion of FTP but
lacks selectivity.

Competently w
ritten with
minor lapses in spelling
and grammar. Style is
readable and mainly
academic.


Most sources
accurately cited in the
text and an appropriate
reference list in
Harvard Style is
provided.

Class III

(Satisfactory
Quality)

40
-
49%

Some degree of
irrelevance to the title.
Superficial
consideration of the
issues.

Demonstrates limited
knowledge of theory and
practice for this level, with
intermittent evidence of an
appreciation of its significance.

A basic argument is evident but
lacks clarity and coherence.

Issues are only vaguely stated.

Conclusions are not always clear
or logical.

Some attempt at
articulation and
logical structure.

An acceptable
format is used.

The presentational
style & layout is largely
correct for the type
of
assignment.

Inappropriate use of
FTP or not used where
clearly needed to aid
understanding.

Generally competent
writing although
intermittent lapses in
grammar and spelling
pose obstacles for the
reader.

Style limits
communication and tends
not to be a
cademic.

Some relevant sources
cited. Some
weaknesses in
referencing technique.

Borderline

Fail



35
-
39%


Some significant degree
of irrelevance to the title
is common. Only

the
most obvious issues are
addressed at a
superficial level and in
unchallenging terms.

Demonstrates weaknesses in
knowledge of theory and
practice for this level, with little
evidence of an appreciation of
its significance.

Limited argument, which lack
s
clarity in places. Conclusions are
neither clear nor logical.

Poorly structured.
Lack of articulation.

Format deficient.

For the type of
assignment the
presentational style
&/or layout is lacking.

FTP ignored in text or
not used where clearly
needed.

De
ficiencies in spelling
and grammar makes
reading difficult.

Simplistic or repetitious
style impairs clarity.



Limited sources and
weak referencing.

Fail


<34%


Relevance to the title is
intermittent or missing.
The topic is reduced to
its vaguest and least
challenging terms.

Demonstrates a lack of basic
knowledge of either theory or
practice for this level, with little
evidence of understanding.

Severely limite
d arguments.
Lacks clarity.

Conclusions are sparse.

Unstructured.

Lack of articulation.
Format deficient

For the type of
assignment the
presentational style
&/or layout is lacking.

FTP as above.

Poorly written with
numerous deficiencies in
grammar,
spelling,
expression and style.

An absence of
academic sources and
poor referencing
technique.



-

30

-



Level HE5



Relevance

Knowledge

Argument/Analysis

Structure

Presentation

Written English

Research/Referencing

Class I

(Exceptional

Quality)

80%+

As for
Class 1(70
-
79%) but exceptional work that makes a contribution to the development of knowledge and understanding in the subject area


70
-
79%


Directly relevant to title.
Addresses most or all of
the implications and
assumptions of the title.

Demonstrates a
comprehensive knowledge of
theory and practice for this
level. Demonstrates ability in
the manipulation and transfer
of subject material to
demonstrate a solid
understanding of the issues.

Makes creative use of appropriate
arguments and/or t
heoretical
models. Contains some distinctive
or independent thinking.

A comprehensive analysis of the
material resulting in clear, logical
conclusions.

Coherently
articulated and
logically structured.

An appropriate
format is used.

The presentational
st
yle & layout is correct
for the type of
assignment.

Effective inclusion of
figures, tables, plates
(FTP).



A very well written

answer with standard
spelling and grammar.

Style is clear, resourceful
and academic.


All sources accurately
cited in the text and a
very extensive
reference list in
Harvard Style is
provided.

Class II/i

(Very Good
Quality)

60
-
69%

Directly relevant to title.

Addresses some of the
implications of the
issues addressed by the
title.

Demonstrates a sound
knowledge of theory and
practice for this level.
Manipulates and transfers
some material to demonstrate
a clear grasp of the themes,
questions and issues.

Uses appropriate arguments or
theoretical models.

Intermittent analysis of the
material, with descriptive or
narrative passages. Clear, logical
conclusions.

For the most part
coherently
articulated and
logically constructed.

An appropriate
format is used.

The presentational
style & layout is correct
for the type of
assignment.

Effe
ctive inclusion of
FTP.

Well written with

standard spelling and
grammar. Style is clear
and academic.


All sources accurately
cited in the text and an
appropriate reference
list in Harvard Style is
provided.

Class II/ii

(Good Quality)


50
-
59%

Generally addresses
the title and its
implications, but
sometimes addresses
irrelevant issues.

Demonstrates an adequate
knowledge of theory and
practice for this level, with
evidence of an appreciation of
its significance.

Provides a coherent argument,
bu
t lacking clear focus and
consistency. Issues lack clarity, or
theoretical models expressed in
simplistic terms.

Evidence of attempted analysis,
with descriptive or narrative
passages. Conclusions are fairly
clear and logical.

Adequate attempt at
articulat
ion and
logical structure.

An acceptable
format is used.

The presentational
style & layout is correct
for the type of
assignment.

Inclusion of FTP but
lacks selectivity.

Competently written with
minor lapses in spelling
and grammar. Style is
readable and

mainly
academic.


Most sources
accurately cited in the
text and a good
reference list in
Harvard Style is
provided.

Class III

(Satisfactory
Quality)

40
-
49%

Some degree of
irrelevance to the title.
Superficial
consideration of the
issues.

Demonstrates

limited
knowledge of theory and
practice for this level, with
intermittent evidence of an
appreciation of its significance.

An argument is evident but lacks
clarity and coherence.

Issues are only vaguely stated.

Largely descriptive or narrative
passages
lacking clear analytical
purpose. Conclusions are not
always clear or logical.

Some attempt at
articulation and
logical structure.

An acceptable
format is used.

The presentational
style & layout is largely
correct for the type of
assignment.

Inappropriate

use of
FTP or not used where
clearly needed to aid
understanding.

Generally competent
writing although
intermittent lapses in
grammar and spelling
pose obstacles for the
reader.

Style limits
communication and tends
not to be academic.

Some relevant sourc
es
cited. Some
weaknesses in
referencing technique.

Borderline

Fail



35
-
39%


Some significant degree
of irrelevance to the title
is common. Only

the
most obvious issues are
addressed at a
superficial level and in
unchallenging terms.

Demonstrates
weaknesses in
knowledge of theory and
practice for this level, with little
evidence of an appreciation of
its significance.

Limited argument, which is
descriptive or narrative in style
with little evidence of analysis.
Conclusions are neither clear nor
log
ical.

Poorly structured.
Lack of articulation.

Format deficient.

For the type of
assignment the
presentational style
&/or layout is lacking.

FTP ignored in text or
not used where clearly
needed.

Deficiencies in spelling
and grammar makes
reading difficult
.

Simplistic or repetitious
style impairs clarity.



Limited sources and
weak referencing.

Fail


<34%


Relevance to the title is
intermittent or missing.
The topic is reduced to
its vaguest and least
challenging terms.

Demonstrates a lack of basic
knowledge of either theory or
practice for this level, with little
evidence of understanding.

Inadequate arguments and no
analysis.

Conclusions are sparse.

Unstructured.

Lack of articulation.
Format deficient.

For the type of
assignment the
presentational

style
&/or layout is lacking.

FTP as above.

Poorly written with
numerous deficiencies in
grammar, spelling,
expression and style.

An absence of
academic sources and
poor referencing
technique.


-

31

-



Level HE6



Relevance

Knowledge

Argument/Analysis

Structure

Presentation

Written English

Research/Referencing

Class I

(Exceptional

Quality)

80%+

As for Class 1(70
-
79%) but exceptional work that makes a contribution to the development of knowledge and understanding in the subject area


70
-
79%


Directly
relevant to title.
Addresses most or all of
the implications and
assumptions of the title.

Demonstrates a
comprehensive knowledge of
theory and practice for this
level. Demonstrates ability in
the manipulation and transfer
of subject material to
demonstra
te a solid
understanding of the issues.

Makes creative use of appropriate
arguments and/or theoretical
models. Contains some distinctive
or independent thinking.

A comprehensive evaluation of
the material resulting in clear,
logical and illuminating
conclusions.

Coherently
articulated and
logically structured.

An appropriate
format is used.

The presentational
style & layout is correct
for the type of
assignment.

Effective inclusion of
figures, tables, plates
(FTP).



A very well written

answer with
standard
spelling and grammar.

Style is clear, resourceful
and academic.


All sources accurately
cited in the text and a
very extensive
reference list in
Harvard Style is
provided.

Class II/i

(Very Good
Quality)

60
-
69%

Directly relevant to title.

Addresses some of the
implications of the
issues addressed by the
title.

Demonstrates a sound
knowledge of theory and
practice for this level.
Manipulates and transfers
some material to demonstrate
a clear grasp of the themes,
questions and issues.

Uses a
ppropriate arguments or
theoretical models.

A sound evaluation of the material
resulting in clear and logical
conclusions.

For the most part
coherently
articulated and
logically constructed.

An appropriate
format is used.

The presentational
style & layou
t is correct
for the type of
assignment.

Effective inclusion of
FTP.

Well written with

standard spelling and
grammar. Style is clear
and academic.


All sources accurately
cited in the text and an
appropriate reference
list in Harvard Style is
provided.

Class II/ii

(Good Quality)


50
-
59%

Generally addresses
the title and its
implications, but
sometimes addresses
irrelevant issues.

Demonstrates an adequate
knowledge of theory and
practice for this level, with
evidence of an appreciation of
its
significance.

Provides a coherent argument,
but some loss of focus and
consistency. Some issues lack
clarity, or theoretical models
expressed in simplistic terms.

Adequate critique, with some
descriptive or narrative passages.
Conclusions are fairly clear
and
logical.

Adequate attempt at
articulation and
logical structure.

An acceptable
format is used.

The presentational
style & layout is correct
for the type of
assignment.

Inclusion of FTP but
lacks selectivity.

Competently written with
minor lapses in
spelling
and grammar. Style is
readable and mainly
academic.


Most sources
accurately cited in the
text and a good
reference list in
Harvard Style is
provided.

Class III

(Satisfactory
Quality)

40
-
49%

Some degree of
irrelevance to the title.
Superficial
consideration of the
issues.

Demonstrates limited
knowledge of theory and
practice for this level, with
intermittent evidence of an
appreciation of its significance.

An argument is evident but lacks
clarity and coherence in places.
Issues are only broadly stated.

Some analysis with descriptive or
narrative passages. Conclusions
are not always clear or logical.

Some attempt at
articulation and
logical structure.

An acceptable
format is used.

The prese
ntational
style & layout is largely
correct for the type of
assignment.

Inappropriate use of
FTP or not used where
clearly needed to aid
understanding.

Generally competent
writing although
intermittent lapses in
grammar and spelling
pose obstacles for the
reader.

Style limits
communication and tends
not to be academic.

Some relevant sources
cited. Some
weaknesses in
referencing technique.

Borderline

Fail



35
-
39%


Some significant degree
of irrelevance to the title
is common. Only

the
most obvious issues are
addressed at a
superficial level and in
unchallenging terms.

Demonstrates weaknesses in
knowledge of theory and
practice for this level, with little
evidence of an appreciation of
its significance.

A basic argument is presente
d,
but largely descriptive or narrative
in style with contradictory
analysis. Conclusions are neither
clear or logical.

Poorly structured.
Lack of articulation.

Format deficient.

For the type of
assignment the
presentational style
&/or layout is lacking.

FTP ignored in text or
not used where clearly
needed.

Deficiencies in spelling
and grammar makes
reading difficult.

Simplistic or repetitious
style impairs clarity.



Limited sources and
weak referencing.

Fail


<34%


Relevance to the title is
intermittent or missing.
The topic is reduced to
its vaguest and least
challenging terms.

Demonstrates a lack of basic
knowledge of either theory or
practice for this level, with little
evidence of understanding.

Severely limite
d arguments.
Descriptive or narrative in style
with no evidence of critique.

Conclusions are sparse.

Unstructured.

Lack of articulation.
Format deficient.

For the type of
assignment the
presentational style
&/or layout is lacking.

FTP as above.

Poorly wri
tten with
numerous deficiencies in
grammar, spelling,
expression and style.

An absence of
academic sources and
poor referencing
technique.




Appendix 3:

CURRICULUM SKILLS MAP (Core Modules)


Modules

Learning to
Learn

Communication

Group
-
work

Problem
-
solving

Self
Management

Use of IT

Numeracy

LEVEL HE4








Management Skills

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA

TDA


TD

Managing People

TD

TDA

TD

TD

TDA



Principles of Marketing

TD

TDA

TD

TD

TD



Business Environment

TDA

TDA


TDA

TD

TD

TDA

Business Finance

TDA

TDA


TDA

TD


TDA

LEVEL HE5








Financial Decision
-
making for
Business Managers

TDA

TDA

DA

TDA

D

D

TDA

Managing Organisational
Behaviour

TDA

TDA

D

TDA

DA



Research Methods

TDA

TDA

TD

TDA

D

D

D

Operations Management

TDA

TDA

TD

TD

D



Work Experience

TDA

TDA

D

TD

DA



LEVEL HE6








Project

TDA

TDA


DA

TDA



Investigative Study

TDA

TDA



TDA

D


Contemporary Management
Issues

TDA

TDA

D

DA

DA



Strategic Management

TDA

TDA

D

DA

DA



T =
taught D = developed A = assessed



-
34

-


Appendix 4: ASSESSMENT SUMMARY TABLE (Core modules)

Modules

Essay

Report

Exam

Presentation

Other

LEVEL HE4






Business Environment

2500 (50%)


3 part exam (50%)



Business Finance


2500 (50%)

Case study based
(50%)



Managing People

2 x 2500

(50% each)





Management Skills




Group (40%)

Personal Progress Report

and Skills Portfolio (60%)

Principles of Marketing


2500 case study
(50%)



2500 article

LEVEL HE5






Managing Organisational
Behaviour

2 x
2500 (50%
each)





Financial Decision
-
making for
Business Managers

2500 (50%)



Group, case study
(50%)


Work Experience


W.E.Report 3000
(60%)



Portfolio of evidence (30%)

Employer‟s report (10%)

Research Methods





Individual (50%)

Research
Proposal 2500 (50%)

Operations Management


2500 (50%)

Closed book (50%)



LEVEL HE6






Strategic Management


2500
Case study
based (50%)

Case study based (50%)



Contemporary Management

Issues

2500 (50%)


Open book (50%)



Project


Reflective
Report(10%)



Project10,000
-
12,000(90%)


Investigative Study

4500
-
5000
(90%)

Reflective report
(10%)





-
34

-



Appendix 5: CURRICULUM OUTCOMES MAP

Modules

A
1

A2

A3

B1

B2

B3

B4

B5

B6

C1

C2

C3

C4

D1

D2

D3

D4

D5

D6

LEVEL HE4




















Principles
of Marketing

X

X


X

X

X

X

X



X



X

X


X



Business Environment

X

X


X

X

X

X

X



X



X

X

X

X

X

X

Business Finance

X



X

X

X

X




X



X

X

X

X

X


Managing People

X

X


X

X

X

X

X



X



X

X


X



Management Skills



X


X


X




X


X

X

X


X

X

X

LEVEL HE5




















Research Methods

X


X

X

X

X

X

X


X

X

X


X

X

X

X

X


Managing Organisational
Behaviour

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X



X



X

X


X



Work Experience

X


X

X



X


X


X

X

X

X

X

X

X


X

Financial Decision
-
making for
Business Managers



X


X

X

X




X

X


X

X

X

X

X


Operations Management

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X



X

X


X

X

X

X

X


LEVEL HE6




















Project

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X


X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X


Investigative Study

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X


X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X


Contemporary Management
Issues

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X



X



X

X


X



Strategic Management

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X



X



X

X


X




Knowledge and understanding in the context of the subject(s)

A1

K
nowledge and critical understanding of the principles which
underpin
business management.

A2

Awareness of the major theoretical and practical aspects central to the
relationship between the various disciplines involved.

A3

Understanding of the limitations of the body of knowledge with regard
to business management

.


Cognitive skills in the context of the subject(s)

B1

The capacity for critical reasoning and analysis.

B2

Synthesis of data/information and interpret findings.

B3

Application of concepts.

B4

Identification and solving of problems.

B5

Discrimination between and evaluation of theories.

B6

Plan, conduct and report a piece of original research based on student work
experience.



Subject
-
specific practical/professional skills

C1

Competence in use of quantitative and qualitative research me
thods.

C2

Communicating in a manner expected of a business professional.

C3

Application of current knowledge skills, techniques and commercial
awareness expected of a business professional.

C4

Appraise own needs for academic, personal and professional
development and make recommendations (Personal Development
Planning)



Other skills (e.g. key/transferable) developed in subject or other
contexts

D1
Capacity to learn and investigate.

D2

Communicate effectively both orally and in writing.

D3

Numerical a
nd quantitative skills appropriate for business use.

D4

Ability to work independently or as part of a team.

D5

Competent in the use of information technology.

D6
Demonstrate work
-
based skills


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