RFID and LMS: improving

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27 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 6 μήνες)

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RFID and LMS: improving
interoperability


Mick Fortune, 2CQR

The Current Picture


LMS/RFID data interchange


SIP, NCIP and beyond


Improving functionality vs improving interoperability


Using proprietary solutions, “lock
-
in?”


Using standards, transferable


Interoperability with LMS the only concern?


Sharing stock may not be possible


Implications for Book Servicing


Book Supply Chain



RFID


The Basics


R
adio
F
requency
IDentification


In use since 1946, 1960, 1990...


In libraries since 1999 (USA)


Key variables include:


Active or Passive


Capacity


Size


Frequency

Key Issues Affecting Interoperability


1. Frequency:


Mostly HF, some UHF (Near and Far Field)


2. Tag Structure and Content


What goes on the tag?


In what order?


In what format?


3. Longevity

1. Frequency

Band

LF


HF

UHF

Microwave

Frequency

30

300kHz

3

30MHz

300 MHz

3GHz

2

30 GHz

Typical RFID
Frequencies

125

134
kHz

13.56 MHz

433 MHz or 865


956MHz 2.45 GHz

2.45 GHz

Approximate
read range

less than 0.5
metre

Up to 1.5 metres

433 MHz = up to 100 metres 865
-
956 MHz = 0.5 to 5 metres

Up to 10m

Typical data
transfer rate

less than 1
kilobit per
second
(kbit/s)

Approximately 25 kbit/s

433

956 = 30 kbit/s 2.45 =100
kbit/s

Up to 100 kbit/s

Characteristics

Short
-
range,
low data
transfer
rate,
penetrates
water but
not metal.

Higher ranges, reasonable
data rate (similar to GSM
phone), penetrates water
but not metal.

Long ranges, high data transfer rate,
concurrent read of <100 items,
cannot penetrate water or metals

Long range, high data
transfer rate, cannot
penetrate water or
metal

Typical use

Animal ID
Car
immobiliser

Smart Labels, Contact
-
less
travel cards, Access &
Security

Specialist animal tracking Logistics

Moving vehicle toll

We are (mostly) here!

But some of us are here.

2. Tag Structure and Content


Data Models


The “format” of the tag.


Library or retail standards?


Open or closed?


The data content


Which fields?


What order?


We need some standards!

The ISO and the Data Model Debate


Two schools of thought


Freedom of choice vs the minimalists


US, UK and Australia vs Scandinavia and the
Dutch


Both have existing models to protect





How do I Decide?


The “Freedom of Choice” model


Any data I want (= complex data management)


Ability to deliver new services (= devalue the LMS)


Better offline circulation (= devalue the OPAC)


Slower throughput (= devalue the service)


Minimalist (“Licence Plating”)


Lets the LMS do the data management


Uses RFID as an aid not a replacement


A Real Life Comparison


Relocating Stock


Minimalist Model


Use Catalogue to Identify
items to be moved.


Batch change location of
items


Download list of UIDS and
titles to DLA


Collect Items from Shelves


Ship

Freedom of Choice Model


Use Catalogue to Identify
items to be moved.


Batch change location of
items


Download list of UIDS and
titles to DLA


Collect Items from Shelves


Process each item to change
tag data.


Ship

3. Longevity


Current chip is guaranteed for 100,000 cycles
(= 50,000 loans), but


How long is the equipment I need to read
them guaranteed for?


Tags developed for retail are often declared
“end of life” (Norwich) by manufacturer.


Agreeing standards will create a stronger
lobby for longer guarantees.


So is RFID still a “Good Thing”?


UK stalled by lack of standards and vision but
with true interoperability can deliver:


Major improvements to existing services


Stock management, self service for non books, theft
reporting


New services


Automated accessioning, Interactive learning
environments.


Some Considerations


Will the lack of standards prevent my service
development?


Do I want to share stock with other libraries?


Should I licence plate or add local data?


Will my servicing company/LMS cope with my
data requirements?


Do the benefits of RFID outweigh its
limitations?




Thank You!


Questions?