VIDEOSCRIPT : FUTURE FANTASTIC BRAINSTORM Time : MINUTES 10.00 19.59

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14 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 11 μήνες)

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VIDEOSCRIPT : FUTURE FANTASTIC


BRAINSTORM

Time : MINUTES 10.00


19.59

Sample paragraphs



Virtual reality


John Clute
:

Television is an important part of our culture. It is
entity

in itself,

it's terribly vital, it
shapes our lives. The thing is going to happen with virtual reality. Sooner or later, we're going to be
able to get into virtual realities that are much more interesting than the
decaying

world outside
.


“Lawnmower Man”
: Wow! It's
my hand! Look at this! Oh my God! Joe? Where are you? I'm right
here Marty! Hehehehe... Come over here! You're beautiful!


Gillian Anderson
: Today's VR developers believe that we won't be shooting up the enemy. We'll be
catching up with old friends. We'll
all have virtual bodies.


John Walder
: In the future you won't walk down the street and bump into your neighbors. You'll
walk down a virtual street and bump into people who live on the other side of the world.


Gillian Anderson
: John Walder. Virtual realit
y engineer.


John Walder
: We're building the first virtual reality, live, interactive world and it's called River
World. And in that context people can meet each other, come together inside a virtual reality cyber
world without any geographic or national f
rontier.Well, here we are in River World. River World is
actually a Lousianian boat
chugging
down the Mississippi River. We are inside the boat in the main
hall and joined with me in this world are two avatars, which are people who've
linked to me

across
t
he network from many, many miles away and here we can interact and discuss things with each
other. How's things, what's the time of day, I got this great

recipe, what's your golf club like, just
about anything. And there is my friend Jason. Hello Jason, ho
w are you?


Jason
: Hello, how are you doing?


John Walder
: I'm fine, thanks. Good to see you. Nice to see you happy to see me.


Jason
: Yeah, yes, I'm happy to see you.


John Walder
: Great, great.


Gillian Anderson
: In these virtual world
get
-
togethers

you'
ll be able to look like whatever you
want to. Whether other people see you as a penguin, a hippie or a potato head, it's going to be up to
you.


Avatar
: I can change my appearance to suit any occasion. Here is me as a girl or favourite when I
want some fun
. A dog! Woof woof!


John Walder
: The big step forward here is the fact that these avatars, these computer
representations of other human beings can now show emotions. I'm using my hand held computer
controller here to control those physiological emotional

states and the further we make a mark we
have happiness, or surprise, or anger, and even sadness. These are the four basic emotional states
that even
particular

babies demonstrate from early life and it is a good starting point when you are
building a com
munication
metaphor
that allows people to have a conversation with each other.


Gillian Anderson
: And we won't just be meeting our friends in the virtual world. We'll be doing
business there.


Virtual Bank Consultant
: Welcome to the interactive bank. These

account transactions are handled
by the teller straight ahead.


John Walder
: These worlds can be like the real world. They work, they
interact
. If you go into a
shop, there will be somebody who addresses you in real time, because that person is actually
w
orking for a department store and serves you with food
albeit
a virtual food that then gets
collated

and distributed in the real world to your front door.


Gillian Anderson
: All these ideas for future virtual worlds have been seen before... in science
fict
ion.


Neal Stephenson
: What I wrote about in science fiction is already coming true.


Gillian Anderson
: Neal Stephenson wrote "Snow crash". A blueprint for VR architects.


Neal Stephenson
: In my book, "Snow crash", the Metaverse is a trade name for a very
large on
-
line
virtual world where millions of people can come together in a three dimensional virtual space and
communicate.


“Snow crash”
: When hero enters the Metaverse and looks down the street and sees buildings and
electric s
igns

stretching off into t
he darkness, disappearing over the
curve

of the globe. He's
actually staring at the graphic representations, the user interfaces of a
myriad

different pieces of
software that had been engineered by major corporations.


Virtual reality glossary


entity






decaying



gnijący, upadający, niszczejący;

chugging



działać (tutaj płynąć) wolno,
ślamazarnie;

linked to me



połączone ze mną / podłączone
摯湩e;

get
-
together



獰潴ka湩n;

particular



獺czegóó;

metaphor



metafora, przenośnia;

interact



oddziaływać wzaje
浮me;

albeit


acz歯汷楥欻

collated



zestawiać;

curve



歲kówa;

myriad


miriada, nieskończenie duża ilość;



Interfaces


Gillian Anderson
: Computers can already generate these worlds. What we're now waiting for is the
technology that will really make us

feel a part of them.


Neal Stephenson
: In order to get into the Metaverse, you need some kind of hardware that will
show you what it looks like. Most of the people in the book use a goggle system,
incorporates

a
low powered lasers in different colors that

project the image directly onto the
retina
.


Gillian Anderson
: And in the Human Interface Technology Lab in Seattle Neal Stephenson's
goggles are actually being built.


Richard Johnston
: With the virtual retinal display we're eliminating the
intermediate

image or the
screen. We are actually using a single beam of light to paint an image on the retina of the eye point
by point. Because of this we've got a closer link between the generation of the image and the view
you actually see. This is the first step t
oward creating a

seamless

environment between the
computer and the human.


Gillian Anderson
: We will no longer need to wear
bulky

head mounted displays to see our virtual
worlds. By painting lasers directly on the eye, we'll get 20x20 virtual vision in not
hing more than a
pair of sunglasses.Technology is getting closer, but not close enough for science fiction. In William
Gibson's "Neuromancer", people connect virtual worlds directly to their minds. They jack
-
in.


“Neuromancer”
: He settled the black terry
s
weatband

across his face, careful not to disturb the flat
Sendai electrodes. He closed his eyes. And in the blood led dark behind his eyes silver phosphines
boiling in from the edge of space,
hypnagogic

images jerking past him like film compiled from
rando
m frames. Symbols, figures, faces, a
blurred

fragmented
mandala

of visual information.


John Clute
: In a novel like “Neuromancer” the basic argument is that your mind can be understood
electronically and can be a participant electronically in a cyberspace
world. This is a science fiction
idea, it's a very good science fiction idea, it's the kind of science fiction idea like the original
emotion of the rocket ship which creates the future.


Gillian Anderson
: Before we know it the tools we use today will seem

like museum pieces.
Cumbersome

and ridiculous. In the future we'll connect with technology in a totally new way. Our
link to the virtual world won't be through our hands, eyes or ears. It will bypass our bodies all
together.


Andrew Jonker
: In The future
no one's going to use keyboards or joysticks to control computers. In
the future we're going to use our minds.


Gillian Anderson
: Andrew Jonker is building an interface that can read our thoughts.


Andrew Jonker
: This is science fiction dates science fact
. This is very similar to a device that is
talked about in Neuromancer, where you wear a set of trodes

on your forehead, you can jack in to
the computer and them move around virtual environments simply by thinking.


Gillian Anderson
: Andrew's headband pick
s up the electrical activity of our brains. Once you have
learned to control this activity you can use it to take control of computers.


Andrew Jonker
: I can unconscious and consciously change the
magnitude

of these brain
fingers.The simplest case for exam
ple if I just quiet myself and stop talking... see how the brain
fingers go down, and if I intensify my energy you can see how all the brain fingers go up.


Gillian Anderson
: The possibilities for this mind to machine control are so significant that the US

Military are training pilots to fly simulators with their thoughts.


Dr Grant McMillan
: Ultimately of course what we want to do is to take this technology out of the
simulator and to put it in to a real airplanes. And there we invasion that it will be a
combination of
speech control, eye tracking as well as having the pilot control interact with their system just by
thinking about it.


Gillian Anderson
: "Neuromancer" is coming true. We are already hooking our minds up to
machines. But beyond cyberspace th
ere is a far more radical place that we could go. If we can hook
our minds to machines, could we use that connection to take us into the mind of another person? It's
a fantastic idea, one that science fiction writers love. Take Isaac Asimov, he imagined a
world
where the dreams of young children are recorded for others to enjoy. This extraordinary idea has
come of age.


Criss Gallan
: In the future we'll be able to record peoples experiences.


Gillian Anderson
: Criss Gallan. Neurologist, psychiatrist, doctor

of biochemistry and a fan of
science fiction.


Criss Gallan
: If you could sit here. Just make yourself comfortable.


Gillian Anderson
: The ideas in "Neuromancer" have inspired his work of the cutting edge in brain
research.


Criss Gallan
: Now slide this o
ver your head.


Gillian Anderson
: He believes that the most advanced brain imaging system that the world has to
offer may one day allow him to read our minds.


Criss Gallan
: What we have here is a state of the art brain functional imaging technology. Your
brain operates the process information, it does so by flowing electrical currents along nerves. The
flow of electricity within your brain generates a subtle magnetic energy field outside of your head.
This field is incredibly tiny. It's like listening to t
he footsteps of ants walking on soft earth, when
surrounded by the rock concert of electromagnetic noise from our environment. We're able to do
that, because we have very sensitive detectors inside this magnetically shielded room. In this
experiment we've
placed these little tap
-
tile stimulators on Nancy's hands, they'll be tapping her and
we'll be looking at where her brain experiences that tapping. Seeing the feeling thoughts that she
has exactly where they occur as they
fluctuate

thousandth of a second t
o thousandth of a
second.We can look at the brain and tell the difference between whether a person has been touched,
or whether they've moved, or whether the have seen something, or whether they have heard
something. Over the course of time we'll be able t
o tell in much more detail what kind of experience
they had and probably over course of time what kind of emotions they had with it.In science fiction,
for example even the "Neuromancer", you can record one persons experiences and interface that
directly,
transfer it, interact with another person. We're recording the experience, understanding the
experience. The other half is that people have to figure ways to transfer the information into the
experience of another person.


Gillian Anderson
: According to sc
ience fiction all this is possible. But first we'll have to take
technology one step closer. Hold on to your heads, we're going in.


“Johnny Mnemonic”
: Activating Penmax memory doubler. Your presen
t capacity 80 gigabytes.
Doubler loading. Your storage capacity is now 160 gigabytes. Warning do not exceed capacity.


Interfaces glossary


incorporate



wcielać, łączyć;

retina



獩慴毳睫s歡;

intermediate



pośredni;

seamless



nieprzerwanie, gładko;

bu
lky



nieporęczny;

sweatband



opaska na czoło;

hypnagogic



湡獥湮ó;

blurred


za浡manó;

mandala



termin oznaczający różnorodne
潢楥歴ó;

cumbersome



nieporęczny, niewygodny;

magnitude



wielkość, rozmiary;

fluctuate



zmienia, ulegać wahaniom;