MASARYK UNIVERSITY BRNO

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MASARYK UNIVERSITY BRNO

FACULTY OF EDUCATION


















Bachelor thesis







Brno 2007









Author: Yvona Zajícová



Supervisor: PhDr. Tamara Váňová






2

MASARYK UNIVERSITY BRNO

FACULTY OF EDUCATION

Department of English Language and Literature


















Dickens´ London
: E
-
Learning

Course


Bachelor
’s

thesis





Brno 2007










Author: Yvona Zajícová




Supervisor:
PhDr Tamara Váňová










3

Bibliography

ZAJÍCOVÁ, Yvona.
Dickens´ London: E
-
Learning

Course
. Brno: Masaryk
Unive
rsity
, Faculty of E
ducation, Department of English Language and Literature, 2007. The
supervisor of
the presented
Bachelor
’s

thesis is PhDr. Tamara Váňová.



Annotation


The aim of this

bachelor's thesis is to present historical London of the 19th century

in
connection with the most
significant

works written by Charles Dickens, in the way this city is
reflected i
n his novels. This work should help secondary s
chool students
-

or the

general
public
-

better understand British life and institutions,
mainly with the focus on thoughts of
the London of

this century.
The form of e
-
learning
course was chosen to catch stud
ents'

interest. This course should also help teachers with their

lesson

preparations on English
literature
and/
or on life and

institutions.

Information on the 19th century London is based on
Michael Paterson's book entitled
Voices from Dickens' London.

Thi
s e
-
learning course is
divide
d i
nto ten chapters and each

c
hapter contains a passage for

teacher
s

of English and
a
passa
ge for s
econdary school students.

For needs of this bachelor's thesis, the first two
chapters were chosen.








K
eywords

E
-
learning, LMS, Moodle
, Dickens, London


4

















Declaration

I proclaim that this bachelor
’s

thesis was done by my own and I

used only the
materials that are stated in the literature sources.

I agree with the placing of this thesis in the Masaryk University Brno in the library of
the Department of English Language and Literature and with the access for studying
purposes.


In Br
no 23
th

July 2007





Yvona Zajícová









..............................................


5




















Acknowledgement


I would like to thank my su
pervisor PhDr. Tamara
Váňová for her help and giving advice
connected with the thesis.



6

Content

INTRODUCTION

……………………………………………………………………………………….



8

THEORETICAL PART

1.

E
-
LEARNING

………………………………………………………………………
………
.….


9

2.

RELATION BETWEEN E
-
LEARNING AND CLASSICAL CLASSWORK

…………
……..


9

2.1

Synchronous education


……………
……
…………………………………………
……
..

10

2.2

Asynchronous education ……
…………………………………………………………
……

10

2.3

Distance and present learning

……….
………………………………………………
……
..

10

2.4

Blended learning

………………………………………………
.
……………………
……
.

11


3.
TH
E

POSITIVE AND NEGATIV
E SIDES OF E
-
LE
ARNING

……
………
……………………


11

3.1 Advantages of
e
-
learning …….

…………………….
……
..
……………………………….

11

3.2 Disadvantages of e
-
learning ……..

……………………………
…………………………..

12

3.3 Comparison of e
-
learning and a common classic method …………………

……………
..

12


3.3
.1
Faster education

……..………………………………………………………………

13


3.3.2
Better education

……………………………………………………………………
..

13


3.3.3
Grading
………………………………………………………………………………

14


3.3.4
Tools of e
-
learning

…………………………………………………………………
..

14


4. HISTORY

OF

E
-
LEARNING ……………
…………………………………………………….

15


5. PARTS

OF E
-
LEARNIG

…………
…………
………………………………………………….

16


5.1 Content …
…………………………………………………………………………………..

16


5.2 Learning management system ………………………………………………………………

17



5.3
L
earnin
g content management system
…………………
…..
……………………………….

18



5.4 Virtual learning environment ………………………..
………………………………………

18


6. MOODLE

……
………
………………………………………………………………………….

19


6.1. Author of Moodle system ………

………………………………………………
…………

19


6.2 Pedagogical approach …………
……………………………………………………………

19


6.2.1
Constructivism

………………………………………………………………………
.

19



6.2.2
Constructionism


………………………………………………………………….
.

20



6.2.3
S
ocial constructivism

… .
……………………………………………………………

20


6.2.4
Connected and separate

……………………………………………………………
..

21


6.2.5
Conclusion

…………………………………………………………………………
..

21


6.3 Overal design …….. …………………………………………
……………………………

22


6.4. Site management …………..
...
……………………………………………………………

22


6.5 User management ..........................

………………………………………………………

22


6.5.1
Overview and enrolment

.............................
.
……………………………………….

22


6.5.2
Roles

.............................................................................................
............................

23


6.6 Course management
……………………………………………………………………


23



6.6.1
Overview

…………………………………………………………………………
..

23



6.6.2
Assignment module

………………………………………………………………
..

23


6.6.3
Chat module

………………………………………………………………………
..

24


7


6.6.4
Forum module

………………………………………
………………………………

24


6.6.5
Glossary module

……………………………………………………………………

24


6.6.6
Lesson module

……………………………………………………………………
..

25


6.6.7
Quiz module

………………………………………………………………………
.
.

25

PRACTICAL PART


7.

INT
RODUCTION OF THE COURSE …………………………………………………………

26

7.1
C
ourse guide .…………………………………………………………………………
.
……

26


7.1.1
The passage meant for students

..................................................................................

27


7.1.2
The passag
e meant for teachers

……………………………………………………
..

28

7.2 Vocabulary …………………………………………………………………………………

29


8. CHAPTER 1


INTRODUCTION ……………………………………………………………
.

29


9. CHAPTER 2


THE PLACE …………………………………………………………………
.

30

CONCLUSION

……………
……………………
………………
………………………………
………

31

BIBLIOGRAPHY

……………
………………………………………………………………………….

32

SOURSES

………………………………………………
……………………………………………….

33

ATTACHMENT

……………
……………………………………………………………………………

34




























8

INTRODUCTION



Internet is nowadays taken as a part

of our everyday life. Most of the population uses
it for many things. One of the use are e
-
learning courses. They are much more popular than
usual class work among students and young people, hence this form is used for presentation
of historical 19
th

cent
ury London and Charles Dickens´ life and work. Moodle, a course
management system, offers pleasant user interface to create e
-
learning course and that is why
this system was chosen. Most

part of the text presented in the course is taken from Michael
Paters
on´s book entitled
Voices from Dickens´ London.

A r
ather simplifi
ed version of the text
is meant to

be studied by secondary school students. There are some methodical ideas how to
work with students and also interesting information about Dickens´ London.























9

THEORETICAL PART


1.
E
-
L
earning


E
-
learning (Electronic learning) is a general term used to refer to computer l
earning. It
is one of the latest

form of education. Nowadays, information and its utilization is one of the
most importan
t condition
s for success. Most

publications and new ideas are published on
internet, therefore an educational process itself should adapt to this progress. E
-
learning can
also refer to educational web si
des such as those offering worksheets and interactive

exercises
for children. The term is also used extensively in the business sector where it generally refers
to cost
-
effective online training.


2.
The Connection of E
-
L
earning and
C
ommon
C
lassic
L
earning
M
ethods


E
-

Learning is
an
effective informative tec
hnology that provides new opportunities in
education. Common classic learning methods have been effective for a long period of time
and therefore they are well trusted. Even though this method is very popular it also has its
negative side.

Unlik
e the com
mon classic method, e
-
l
earning is a new method shaped for today’s
modern lifestyle. This method can be exciting, personal and interactive with our everyday life.
Even when the personal contact with teachers is necessary, they can answer everything
through
internet and because they can go online even during their “off” hours
,

they

can
answer emergency questions at any time, therefore, the learning becomes more effective.
Educators become a great part of e
-
learning due to the online communication. They have a

great opportunity to see the progress of students work and see where the student’s knowledge
is lacking or improving. As mentioned before, teachers can do this due to internet. Instead of
repeating the same material in classes, they can spend more time pr
eparing for new interesting
methods of teaching. This allows the teaching to be more current, interesting and fun
ny
. E
-
learning gives
teachers

great tools to make learning easier, faster and more personal. Both
methods bring

synchronous and asynchronous

e
ducation
.

Even synchronous and
asynchronous activities can be found while reading about e
-
learning.




10

2.1


Synchronous E
ducation

This method concentrates

on specific time where all students are thought in
classrooms or auditoriums. During this t
ime they a
re ta
ught by teachers. Th
ey could

also

be
ta
ught through internet in online classrooms as w
ell as chat rooms or discussion

boards. They
can be used by students, students and their teacher and,
indeed by

teachers themselves.


2.2


Asynchronous E
ducation


As
ynchronous education could be applied during different times
and with

different
students. The students

can choose themselves the rate

of the information flow. However,
they

ca
nnot interact with the teacher

during this time. During this method the student
s use books,
manuals, audio and video,

forums,

chat rooms and emails.
Asynchronous education

includes
also written tests because teacher
s cannot communicate with the student
while correcting
his/her test.


2.3

Distance
and P
resent
L
earning

Distance learn
ing i
s very advantageous for p
eople who cannot attend classes

on regular
basis. It is also useful

for students who are trying to finish their education after taking some
time off,
who
are full time employees or are limited by long distance
s
. The University of
L
ondon was the first university to offer
a
distance learning degree via correspondence in
1858. Computers and internet have only made distance learning easier.

In some countries

this
is

a very popular method due to long distances. One of the countries where

this method is

most

popular is Australia where t
he contact of student
-
teacher is very limited

if any
.


Present learning used to be very common and included many traditional tools. Using only
this method
is now less popular due to the latest

methods that
are available to us

thanks

to the
popularity of internet
.




11

2.4 Blended L
earning


E
-
learning is most commonly combined with other type
s of learning methods. Most
schools combine several methods (according to

their budget
s
) to provide the best environme
nt
for their
students.
Their goal is to get

students be involved with their studying every day. The
use of two learning methods and more is called „blended learning“.

E
-
learning provides
a
rich variety of combined methods. Even though this allows the
stu
dents to do well, students s
till have to put a lot of effort and time in their studies
.
Though
many

combined methods can even create chaos. To accomplish the best results, students must
decide carefully

which

program
me

works the best

for them. Blended lear
ning is

part of
carefully chosen methods of present and distance learning that work well with our lifestyle.


3. The P
ositive and
N
egative
S
ide
s

of
E
-
L
earning


E
-
l
earning creates new way
s

of teaching and learning. It is

more personal, balanced,
and helps

develop team working skills. The new technology makes schools change their
attitude to education. In today’s world where technology is a very important part of our lives,
new technological tools are

an

unthinkable part of education.

Though, there are not

only
advantages but some disadvantages as well.


3.1 Advantages of E
-
L
earning



c
lass work can be scheduled around other activities such as work and family



s
tudents can choose the learning materials for their level of knowledge and interest



e
-
learning r
e
duces the time of travel and minimizes the costs of commuting



students can study anywhere;

t
he only thing they need is to have access to a computer
and internet connection



s
elf
-
paced learning allows students to work at their own pace and have more time

they
would lack in classrooms



f
lexibility to join discussions at any hour, or visit with classmates and instructors in
chat rooms


12



i
nstructors and students both believe that e
-
learning is more pers
onal as they spend
more time “ O
ne on One “



e
-
learning he
lps improve computer skills that are necessary in career and every day
life



e
-
learnin
g can build self
-
confidence and
encou
r
ages students to continue their
education.



s
tudents can go over materials they have already mastered and conc
entrate
their
efforts
in

areas containing new information and/or skills



t
he courses are cheaper than regular courses mainly in countries such
as
Australia or
the USA


3.2
Disadvantages of E
-
L
earning



l
earners who have problems with low motivation usually do not do well



w
ith
out the more common structures of a traditional class, students may be confused
and their schedule can get chaotic



d
ue to the limited contact, students may feel isolated from the teacher and classmates
and easily lose motivation



t
eacher may not always be

available when students are studying or need help



t
echn
ical difficulties such as slow i
nternet connections or older computers may make
accessing course materials frustrating



s
tudents who do not have good or basic online skills might find some assignment
s
difficult



s
ome tasks
can be

more
difficult

as there is no visual help.


3.3
Comparison of E
-
L
earning and
a
Common C
lassic
M
ethod

As mentioned before, both of these methods have their up
s and downs. Even though the
e
-
l
earning is becoming more popular a
s it suits our

lifestyle. The common classic m
ethod is a
good choice for students who prefer campus life and their responsibilities are minimal. Such

13

as college students would probably rather choose going to college and enjoying college life
instead of liv
ing at home and taking online courses in their room
s

alone.


3.3.1
F
aster E
ducation

Learning
with a
common

classic m
ethod

This method limits students from getting the necessary information at the time of need.
However, the students cannot repeat their

classes taught by teachers and this is very important
especially once the material gets difficult.

E
-
learning


E
-
learning provides faster education. E
-
learning helps students concentrate on the
ir

education whenever they are ready. They can turn their com
puter on and start their lesson
s
.
As soon as their work is completed and submitted they are informed of every single change in
their schedule and next step they need to take.


3.3.2
Better E
ducation

Learning
with
a
common

classic method

It is supposed
that all students in the class are able to learn while the lesson is running
and, of course, they want to study at the time. However, reality is different.
The common
classic method is useful

when students learn at the same pace and have the time to meet a
t a
specific time.

E
-
learning


E
-
learning

is better. It

gets rid of all the negatives that common classic learning
provides. Students can develop their own pace and cho
o
se the way they want to study and
when t
hey want to study. They can also

go back to
a
more
difficult material any time they
want. They can practice tests and due to many questions and
exercises

they will remember
the
material better.


14

3.3.3
Grading

Common classic method

It is very hard to see what the amount of

information students reme
mber

after a certain
time. The quality of knowledge varies and depends on the tea
cher. During the class time it is

difficult to check if students understood

the

material properly due to time limit
s
.


E
-
learning


E
-
learning has the possibility of

check
ing

t
he amount and quality of information
students were able to remember after every session due to practicing tools. These tools can
also set achievable goals. Students can answer 95 out of 100 questions and easily measure
their

knowledge, this is also a good

way for teachers to see the percentage of success and see
what part of
the
c
overed material needs to be
repeated. E
-
learning provides new forms of
relationship and communication

between students and teachers
. E
-
learning allows the
relationships to be mor
e

personal, exciting,

beneficia
l and also much easier.


3.3.4
Tools of E
-
L
earning

There appeared new educational tools in students´ life when e
-
learning came

into being.

There are several kinds of edu
cational
tools, e.g. communic
ation tools
, productivit
y tools or

student involvement tools
.

Communication T
ools



Discussion forums



online tools that save messages over a period of days, weeks, or
even months
.



Internal e
-
mail



students can sent or read their e
-
mail from inside an e
-
learning
course



Real
-
tim
e chat



it is a conversation between people

via
the I
nternet. Chat involves
exchanging messages at the same time



15

Productivity T
ools



Bookmarks



students can easily return to important pages in their course using
bookmarks



Orientation/help




i
t is a co
urse guide, it should help student
s learn how to use their
course



Calendar/Progress review



students can write down their plans

for their course

Student I
nvolvement
T
ools



Self
-
assessment



this tool allow
s

students to practise their knowledge or take re
view
test
s

online



Student community building tools



students are able to create study groups or
collaborative teams



St
udent portfolios



it is often
part

of students personal homepage in the course. Each
student can show his/her work in a course and displ
ay personal information


4. History of E
-
L
earning



The first system for computer
-
assisted instruction,

from which e
-
learning evolved, was
the
Plato System

developed at t
he University of
Illinois
.

The term 'e
-
learning' itself has been

used from

the mid
-
19
90s. According to

Wikipedia, by 2003, more than 1.9 million students
were participating in on
-
line learning at institutions of higher education in the United States
(
Electronic learning: Wikipedia: the free encyclopedia
). There is an explosive rate of grow
th,
about 25 percent a year. A
round the world, great numbrers

of private, as well as many public
higher education institutions, now offer on
-
line classes.










16

5.
Parts of E
-
L
earning


In connection to e
-
learning, there should be explain
ed

four import
ant expressions


content, LMS, LCMS and VLE.


5.1
Content

Content is a form of electronic or online course enhancing the quality of learning through

presentations. It can be any kind of electronic document. Also CDs that are often installed in
busin
ess or
program
mes

available o
nline are supposed to be a good

way to improve our
knowledge and skills. However these program
me
s that do not provide any outs
ide help
(contact with teachers

and supervisors) usually do not succeed because there is no
communica
tion and no support from outside.

Technology is improving every day. However, the

way children and adults are tau
ght is
still the same. High
quality e
-
learning courses are based on theory that students are
independent. Based on this theory, electronic c
ourses should have these characteristics.




t
he ability to cho
ose the best pace

of information flow



e
asy instructions and easy computer operating



s
etting realistic but challenging goals




e
xciting and well balanced teaching material



e
xamples that are com
mon and practical, graphic rep
resentation and outside sources




w
ell balanced and carefully chosen combined methods




t
he ability to be able to go over

the

studied material.



g
rading that shows progress of

a

learner’s work



t
he possibility to have a close

connection and c
ommunication with teachers

and
students


5.2
Learning Management System

A
Learning Management System

(
LMS
) is a software package that en
ables the management a
delivery of online content to learners. Most LMSs are web
-
based to facilitate "
any time, any

17

place, any pace" access to learning content and administration (
Learning management system:
Wikipedia:

the free encyclopedia
).

The most important characteristics of LMS:



is to organize and lead education



communication



provide feedback for s
tudents and teachers



course calendar



grading of coursework

A g
ood organization is what lets students see their progress. Of course
,

not all LMS
products are the same but the top systems are on the same level. The variety of products
ranges from basic to v
ery complex systems that are very hard to function. The quality and
price range is also very wide and the most expensive does not always mean the best. One of
the best systems is Moodle.

What to expect from a high quality product:




a
large variety of lear
ning methods from chats and to
common teaching in classrooms



the main m
enu that provides learners with electronic courses, online classrooms,
outside sources etc.



the ability to track the progress of their work as well as the work of other fellow
student
s.



a
rich
variety of synchronous and asynchronous

methods



the ability to

use other systems and programmes


5.3

Learning Content Management System

The term LCMS (Learning Content Management System) recognizes systems that help
develop electronic course
s and solve team progress. The focus of an LCMS is on learning
content. It gives authors, instructional designers, and subject matter experts the means to
create and re
-
use e
-
learning content more efficiently. The primary business problem an LCMS
solves is

to create just enough content in time to meet the needs of individual learners or

18

groups of learners. It also has the ability to contact the cr
eative source in order to correct

any
faults. One of the most popular and effective products is Moodle system.


5.4

Virtual L
earning
E
nvironment

A virtual learning environment (VLE) is a software system designed to facilitate teachers
in the management of educational courses for their students, especially by helping teachers
and learners with course administrati
on. The system can often track the learners’ progress,
which can be monitored by both teachers and learners. While frequently thought of as
primarily tools for distance education, they are most often used to supplement the face
-
to
-
face
classroom (
Virtual l
earning environment: Wikipedia: the free encyclopedia
).

A VLE is a computer program
me

that helps computerized learning. Such e
-
learning
systems are online education and they are sometimes called LMS or LCMS. In the United
States LMS is the more common ter
m. In the United Kingdom and many Eur
opean countries
the terms VLE are

favo
u
red. Universities and other institutions of higher education are
increasingly turning to VLEs in order to:



f
acilitate the integration of distance and campus
-
based learning or of le
arning on
different campuses



p
rovide a service for students who increasingly look to the internet as the natural
medium for finding information and resources



e
conomize on the time of teaching staff, especially when they are also involved in
research and ad
ministration













19

6. MOODLE


The word Moodle was originally an acronym for
Modular Object
-
Oriented Dynamic
Learning Enviroment
. Anyone who uses Moodle is a Moodler.
It

is a course management
system designed to help educators who want to create quali
ty online courses. The software is
used all over the world by universities, schools, companies and independent teachers. Moodle
is open source and completely free to use. It was developed by Martin Dougiamas.
Currently
there are 30
,
066 sites from 189 count
ries who have registered. In the Czech Republic, there
are 168 registered sites.



6.1
The A
uthor of Moodle
S
ystem


Martin Dougiamas was born in August, 1969, and lives in Perth in Australia. He has
been working on internet staff since 1986. He started t
o work at Curtin University as a
WebC
T administrator. Once he said

that his main mission in his life now is Mooodle. He
started it in 1999 with the existing commercial software at the time. Since then the project has
been growing. His later Ph.D. studies s
trongly influenced some of the design of Moodle,
providing pedagogical aspects missing from many other e
-
learning platforms.


6.2

Pedagogical

A
pproach

The philosophy of Moodle includes a constructivist
and a social constructivist

approach

to education. It me
ans that learners, not only teachers, can creatively contribute to the
educational experience. This short paragraph tries to explain what these phrases mean because
this concept can be new for many students, even some teachers.



6.2.1 Constructivism

Thi
s point of view maintains that people actively construct new knowledge as t
hey
interact with their environ
ment. Everything you read, see, hear, feel, and touch is tested
against your prior knowledge and if it is viable within your mental world, may form ne
w
knowledge you carry with you. Knowledge is strengthened if you can use it successfully in
your wider environment. You are not just a memory bank passively absorbing information,
nor can knowledge be "transmitted" to you just by reading something or liste
ning to someone.


20

This is not to say you can't learn anything from reading a web page or watching a
lecture, obviously you can, it is

just pointing out that there is more interpretation going on
than a transfer of information from one brain to another. (
Ph
ilosophy: MoodleDocs)


6.2.2 Constructionism

Constructionism asserts that learning is particularly effective when constructing
something for others to experience. This can be anything from a spoken sentence or an
internet posting, to more complex artifac
ts like a painting, a house or a software package.

For example, you might read this page several times and still forget it by tomorrow
-

but if you were to try and explain these ideas to someone else in your own words, or produce
a slideshow that explaine
d these conc
epts, then I can guarantee you would

have a better
understanding that is more integrated into your own ideas. This is why people take notes
during lectures, even if they never read the notes again. (
Philosophy: MoodleDocs)


6.2.3 Social Const
ructivism

This extends the above ideas into a social group constructing things for one another,
collaboratively creating a small culture of shared artifacts with shared meanings. When one is
immersed within a culture like this, one is learning all the time

about how to be a part of that
culture, on many levels.

A very simple example is an object like a cup. The object can be used for many things,
but its shape does suggest some "knowledge" about carrying liquids. A more complex
example is an online course
-

not only do the "shapes" of the software tools indicate certain
things about the way online courses should work, but the activities and texts produced within
the group as a whole will help shape how each person behaves within that group.
(
Philosophy: Moo
dleDocs)



21

6.2.4 Connected and Separate

This idea looks deeper into the motivations of individuals within a discussion.
Separate

behaviour is when someone tries to remain 'objective' and 'factual', and tends to
defend their own ideas using logic to find h
oles in their opponent's ideas.
Connected

behaviour is a more empathic approach that accepts subjectivity, trying to listen and ask
questions in an effort to understand the other point of view.

Constructed

behaviour is when a
person is sensitive to both of

these approaches and is able to choose either of them as
appropriate to the current situation.

In general, a healthy amount of connected behaviour within a learning community is a
very powerful stimulant for learning, not only bringing people closer toge
ther but promoting
deeper reflection and re
-
examination of their existing beliefs. (
Philosophy: MoodleDocs)


6.2.5 Conclusion

Once you are thinking about all these issues, it helps you to focus on the experiences
that would be best for learning from the
learner's point of view, rather than just publishing and
assessing the information you think they need to know. It can also help you realise how each
participant in a course can be a teacher as well as a learner. Your job as a 'teacher' can change
from bei
ng 'the source of knowledge' to being an influencer and role model of class culture,
connecting with students in a personal way that addresses their own learning needs, and
moderating discussions and activities in a way that collectively leads students tow
ards the
learning goals of the class.

Obviously Moodle doesn't force this style of behaviour, but this is what it is best at
supporting. In future, as the technical infrastructure of Moodle stabilises, further
improvements in pedagogical support will be a

major direction for Moodle development.
(
Philosophy: MoodleDocs)
.





22

6.3
Overal D
esign



c
an be fully utilized in

a social constructionist pedagogy



i
t can be used

for online classes
, it can also
supplement face
-
to
-
face learning



i
t works in a simple,
efficient, compatible

interface



t
he system is e
asy to

be

install
ed

on almost any platform
;

r
equires only o
ne database



t
he course offers
descriptions for every course on the server,

and also the possibility
for guests to participate in it



t
hroughout the
course there is a strong e
mphasis on
security.


6.4 Site M
anagement



t
he s
ite
can be directed by

an admin
istrative

user
.




e
xisting Moodle installations
can be extended with plug
-
in activity modules



t
he author of the course can force any language he wants

the students to work in and in
this case he can choose from more than

70 languages

6.5 User M
anagement

6.5.1
Overview

and E
nrolment



t
he objective of the course is to diminish administrative
involvement to a minimum,
while retaining
a
high security



t
he system offers s
tandard email method

during which learners

can
make

their own
login accounts. Email addresses are verified by confirmation.



a
fter the first entrance, each s
tudent
is

encouraged to
make his/her

own

online profile
including photos,
persona
l
description

and so on
.
Most data are protected if required.



e
ach participant
can
decide for his/her own

time
-
zone, and
all data will be
automatically transformed to

that time
-
zone (e.g. posting dates, assignment due dates
etc)



e
ach participant has a fr
ee choice as to the language he/she will be using in

the
Moodle interface (English, French, German, Spanish, Portuguese etc)




23


6.5.2

Roles



i
n each course the author can define roles

for specific

users




t
he creation of courses
is

control
led by an adm
inistrative account




t
he authors of these c
ourse
s
can
prepare new

courses, teach in them, and
decide about
the creation of other roles




t
eachers
play a particular role in each
specific course.


6.6
Course M
anagement

6.6.1
Overview



a

teacher has full

control over all settings for a course
.




t
here are three possible formats a creator of the course can choose from: a
format by
week, by topic or
by
a discussion

forum




t
he creator of the c
ourse

can choose his/her own t
heme

of colours and layout
.



t
here i
s a very flexible set of course activities
-

forums, q
uizzes,
g
lossari
es, resources,
choices,

a
ssignments,
c
hats,
w
orkshops



t
eacher(s) and students can be placed in one or more groups



r
ecent changes to the course
,

since

the last login, can be shown

on t
he course home
page

which, of course, can help students for a better orientation in the latest changes



a
ll grades for
all the offered activities can be seen

on one page



c
opies of forum posts, teacher feedback etc can be mailed in HTML or plain text.


6.
6.2 Assignment Module



a
ssignments can be
accompanied
with a
deadline an
d a maximum grade.



s
tudents can upload their assignments (any file format) to the
server
-

they are date
-
stamped



l
ate assignments are
also possible
, but the
time over the deadline

i
s shown clearly to
the teacher


24



f
or each particular assignment,
the whole class can be evaluated
(grade and comment)
on one page in one form.



t
eacher feedba
ck is added
to the assignment page for each student, and
the grades are
sent out
.



t
he teacher can

allow resubmission of assignments after grading

to improve the final
score


6.6.3

Chat
M
odule



a
llows smooth, synchronous text interaction
either among students themselves or
between a teacher and an individual student or students



i
ncludes

set

profile
s

in the chat window
(photos, pictures)



a
ll sessions are saved

for later view
ing, and they

can also be made available to
students


6.6.4

Forum Module



t
here are available different types of forums
, suc
h as teacher
-
only, course news and
open
-
t
o
-
all



a
ll pos
tings

have the author´s

photo attached.



i
ndividual forums can be subscribed to by each person or the teacher can force
subscription for all



a
ttached

illustrations

are shown
o
nline


6.6.5

Glossary Module



t
his
module best illustrates the advantage of
Moodle over a traditional classroom
teaching



s
tudents

can contribute to this module and

their ideas
can be appreciated and can result
in their pride of the improvement of this public module.


25



a
llows par
ticipants to create and keep

a list of definitions, li
ke a dictionary



s
tudent entries can be previewed by instructors before
being published




e
ntries
can be searched or browsed according to alphabet, category, date, or

author



s
tudents can easily find references in a

glossary of terms



a
ny word or phrase tha
t is put to the Glossary is automatically highlighted and
hyperlinked in any text of the specific course of Moodle.



g
lossary items can be grouped in categories



g
lossaries can be fully searched


6.6.5
Lesson Module



a

lesson
can be presented in a line
ar way or in a branching manner

or a combination of
the two.



t
his module o
ffers
various ways of scoring and grading.



q
uestion pages include
multiple

choice, T/F,

short answer and essay
.



s
tudent attempts, time limits, minimum score and retakes can be set
.



s
tudents
can

see running scores to the questions



th
e p
assword
is
protected


6.6.6
Quiz Module



t
eachers can
choose
a database of questions
to be used

in different quizzes



q
uizzes can be

limited
as to the time period in

which

the students are suppose
d to
answer the specific question




q
uizzes can be
used several times

and can show feedback and/or correct answers



q
uiz questions and quiz answ
ers can be shuffled

to reduce cheating



m
ulti
ple
-
choice questions offer
single or multiple answers



s
hort Answe
r questions (words or phrases)



t
rue
-
False questions



m
atching questions



r
andom questions


26

PRACTICAL PART


7
.

Introduction of the C
ourse

Dickens´ London is
an e
-
learning course especially created for high school students
learning English literature a
nd their teachers. The whole course is in English, therefore
students lean English throughout the course and understand it better. Due to passive use of the
language, students learn terms that help them understand the material better and write better
paper
s. As well as English was forced in setting of the course to help students with
understand
ing

the material and computer science, also

an

“orangewhite” theme was forced
due to potential graphic errors.


7.
1

Course G
uide

In the opening of the course, user
s are offered
a Course Guide. The Course G
uide
introduces students to the course and how they can work with it.



This e
-
learning course is divided into ten chapters and each of the chapters contains a
passage for a teacher of English and a rather si
mplified version of the text taken from the
Michael Paterson´s book
Voices from Dickens' London
. It is meant to be studied by secondary

school students.


In the passage determined for students, the student will find:



information on the 19th century London

based on Michael Paterson's book entitle
d
Voices from Dickens' London



a short plot of one of Dickens' novels and basic characteristic features of the ch
osen
work and main characters



revision of the vocabulary
-

two kinds of very simple revision of the voc
abulary of the
studied chapter

In the passage meant for teachers, the teacher can expect to find:



a guideline how to work w
ith the text given to students



further interesting information on th
e 19th century London



copy
activities


27



references to materials con
nected with Dickens' works ( some with audio

files) to be
found on internet



references to internet pages where a teacher can find
-

according to his
/her

needs
-

more detailed information bo
th on London and Dickens' works



other interesting teaching material
s that can make the lesson for students more
attractive


7.1.1
The Passage Meant for S
tudents

Text
on London



Each t
ext in this part is based on

Michael Paterson´s book mentioned above. Each of
the chapters on London is divided into smaller parts, at t
he end of which the student will find
a question. The answer to this question is to be found in the previous text. The student can
choose one of three possible answers, but only one of them, of course, is correct. In case the
student chooses a wrong answer
, he is automatically sent back to the main text. If the answer
is correct, he/she can go on studying the following passage.

Vocabulary



Less known words
-

occurring in the simplified and abridged text
-

have been put into
a special Vocabulary. Each word,

which has been chosen for this Vocabulary, is
-

at the same
time
-

highlighted throughout the whole text accompanying this course and the student has
thus an opportunity to revise the meaning of the searched word whenever he/she fe
els like.
Moreover, stud
ents have

also the possibility of actively broadening this Vocabulary according
to their needs simply by adding their own new words into the already existing Vocabulary.

Revision of the V
ocabulary 1

-

matching exercises



Here, in a form of an easy test
-

the so
-
called MATCHING EXERCISE
-
, the student
can verify if he/she has correctly understood the meaning of hitherto unknown words in the
studied
chapter. The

test contains only such words that have occurred in the given chapter and
have also been included

and explained in our accompanying Vocabulary.



28

Revision of the
V
ocabulary 2

-

multiple choice tests



In this test
-

called MULTIPLE CHOICE TEST
-

the student can revise the same
words which have already been studied in Revision of the vocabulary 1, but t
his time the form
of the revision is different. The student is supposed to fill in a missing word out of four
possibilities offered under each sentence.


7.1.2
The Passage Meant for T
eachers

Work with the T
ext



Study material called “Th
e Book” is full o
f instructions and

ideas how to properly use
texts about London that is part of study material for students. This book is divided into
specific parts. It

i
s int
ended for students and teachers

who can raise questions about
a
specific
text. Students can also

surf the websites for additional answers they might have. For example
in s
ubchapter about C
ockney teache
r has the
possibility

to find many answers in the
Dictionary of
Cockney

or Trans
late English to Cockney.

Copy A
ctivities



This “book”
is created from

many small quizzes, tests, maps and other study tools.
Tests are made of interactive parts of Vocabulary for students. Almost all ma
terial is directed
to teachers

in didactic assignments for work with text. Every test has also
an
answer key.

Dickens´ N
ove
ls



An u
nthinkable part of every ch
apter is

the website that provides
a
wr
itten or spoken
version of each of

C
harles Dickens’

novel
s
. Teachers

have the opportunity to
choose

the topic
that they would like to introduce to their students.

Further

Interestin
g T
hings



T
he teacher

finds information about the lifestyle of English
society

in

the

19th
century

in
every chapter.
This

information
is

found in a book
entitled
What Jane Austen Ate and
Charles Dickens Knew
written

by Daniel Pool.


29

7.2
Vocabulary

This p
art is introduced

to users

in more detail

in

the

Course
Guide. It i
s very important
that

the

words that users are to this point unfamiliar with
are highlighted in any

part of the

text
of the course
. Students wishi
ng to find the definition in the V
o
cabulary

can simply click on
these

words and find
the meaning immediately
. This means that
there is
a
description or
a
definition

of the word, and moreover, the word is

used in a
practical
sentence
in this
Vocabulary.


8.


Chapter 1


Introduction

This chapter in
troduces Charles Dickens and the London of the 19th century.

Study material for students
:



London of the 19th century



this part is composed as a journal containing 3 parts
(London of the 19th century, Cockney and Money used in the 19th century).
After
re
ading a short text, students have to answer a question about the text.
Whenever
students answer correctly, they are allowed to continu
e. However, if students´ answers
are incorrect, they
have to go

back to the previous text.



Charles Dickens´ bibliography



short introduction of Dicken
s
´ life and his novels



Revision of Vocabulary I, II

Material for teachers
:



London of the 19the century

-

t
his part is call
ed the “Book” and is targeted at

all
teachers who are familiar with Teacher’s books. This Book is full of

instructions to
guide users through the text.



Charles Dickens
-

bibliography

is a
website

dedicated to this g
reat writer.



Copy A
ctivities




30

9
.

Chapter 2
-

The P
lace

This chapter is dedicated


to

the

most


popular places in

London. As users read thi
s
c
h
apter they realize that London

is much more different than they

might

think. Visitors of the
19th century London are not astonished by magnificent buildings but they are bothered by
stink, pollution and mess.

Study material for students:




The place

-

T
he text is again cr
eated in the form of a journal and that is why
it does
not miss questions relating to the text.
This chapter is divided into 6 parts
:
First
Impression, London Bridge and its surroundings how we do not know it, St Paul's
Cathedral, Gog an
d Magog, The Changing City, Other interesting landmarks
.



Great Expectations



It is

composed from a short but understandable summary of the
novel. The text is also divided into 8 very short parts
,

so

that

students do not have
difficulties understanding the

readings.

This part also has some questions relating to
the text



Great Expectations


main charac
ters


the main characters are reintroduced and
summarized in this part



Revision of Vocabulary I, II

Material for teachers:



The place


a guideline how to wor
k with the text which
is included in the

part for
student
s



Great Expectations



teachers are referred to
a website, where they can find the whole
text of the novel



Quiz


again, there is a link
to
a website with a quiz that reassures the knowledge of
the

plot of the n
ovel.

The hard copy

of this quiz

is also available

in copy a
ctivities
.



Copy A
ctivities



Further interesting things

-

i
nteresting information such as how the English kept
c
lean and the importance of horses in
the
19th century



Interactive map o
f London



the guideline how teachers could use it. The map is a
useful

tool but it can only be used with internet connection.

If they can
not use it, there
is a map of London

in Copy A
ctivities.


31

CONCLUSION


The work on the e
-
learning course entitled
Dicken
s´London

was highly interesting not
only because of a number of historical facts involved, but also due to coming across various
details from Dickens´ life, his stay in London, and the reflections of all of this in his works.


There is a great chance that
this course will help teachers and offer them new ideas so
that they could make their lessons much more attractive for their students and thus make them
more active at the English lessons. The contents of this course may help the students not only
when wri
ting essays required at literature lessons but mainly when preparing their papers for
their school final exams.


According to most Czech teachers´ experience at our elementary and secondary
schools, e
-
learning courses cannot


unfortunately


be made full
use of in the educational
process. Most Czech teachers are extremely limited by the low number of English lessons per
week and a large number of schools are also limited financially, so they cannot get equipped
with all the necessary materials that the e
-
l
earning methods require. Nevertheless, some
schools utilize a possible purchase of network CDs, which are being offered as an
accompanying material to certain textbooks.


For the elaboration of this e
-
learning course has been chosen the
Moodle

system as it
s
software
seems to be one of the best for the creation of this course. Its

unique software
program
me

helps students focus on the best w
ay of learning.

It concentrates the learner's
poi
nt of view, instead of only

just assessing the information you think t
hey need to know.
T
his is considered

to be

one of
the best learning software

systems

in the world used in more
than 180 countries. A course can have its own theme of colours

and layout; i
t allows students
to enjoy

Forums
, Chats, Quizzes and Glossaries.


E
-
learning courses offer a great variety of the latest educational methods which can be
fully applied not only by schools, but also for adult education, either on a private basis or in
business companies. This is also another why this system of learning can
expect a glamorous
future.




32

Bibliography

Fairhurst, Andrew, and Tom Hutchinson.
Project Plus, Teacher's Book. O
xford: Oxford
University Press, 2002

Paterson, Michael.
Voices from Dickens' London
. Cincinnati: David & Charles book, 2007.

Pool, Daniel.

What Jane Austen ate and Charles Dickens knew.

New York: Touchstone, 1994.

Charles Dickens.
Wikipedia
. 03 June 2007.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Dickens>.

Cockney.
Wikipedia.

Wikimedia Foundation,Inc. 23 Jun 2007
<
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cockney
>.

English
-

Slang.
A Cockney Rhyming Slang Dictionary
. 4 Feb 2007. 24 Jun 2007
<
http://www.aldertons.com/index.htm
>.

Feature Definitions.
Ed
utools
. 18 jul 2007. 22 Aug 2007
<http://www.edutools.info/glossary.jsp?pj=8>.

Great Expectations.
Sparknotes
. 2006. 07 Jul 2007 <http://pd.sparknotes.com/lit/greatex/>.

London Bridge.

Wikipedia
. Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.. 6 Jul 2007
<
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_bridge#History
>.

Mandal, Anthony.
Images.
London and literature in the 19th century
. 21 Jan 2002. Cardiff
University. 24 Jun 2007 <
http://www.cf.ac.uk/encap/skilton/illustr/index.html
>.

Perdue, David. Dickens Fast Facts.
Charles Dickens'P
age.

2007. 23 Jun 2007
<
h
ttp://charlesdickenspage.com/index.html
>.

Perd
ue, David. Great Expectations.

Charles Dickens
´

Page
. 2007. 07 Jul 2007
<http://charlesdickenspage.com/expectations.html>.

Philosophy.

Moodle Docs
. 18 Jul 2007. 18 Jul 2007 <http://docs.moodle.org/en/Philos
ophy>.

Smith, Gordon. The Cockney translator.
Cockney rhyming slang.

2006. 23 Jun 2007
<
http://www.cockneyrhymingslang.co.uk/rabbit
>.

St Paul's Cathedral.

Wikipedia
. Wikimedia Foundation, Inc..
6 Jul 2007
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Pauls_Cathedral>.

Victoria of the United Kingdom.

Wikipedia
. Wikimedia Foudation
, Inc
. 22 Jul 2007
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_of_the_United_Kingdom >.



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34