Task 2.1 - Ten-Week Scratch Teaching Program

crateleftInternet και Εφαρμογές Web

4 Δεκ 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 9 μήνες)

61 εμφανίσεις

Task 2
.1
-

Ten
-
Week

Scratch

Teaching Program

Salvatore Testa 10030615

CSE3152


Program
Rationale



Context:

This program is designed for a
Year
8

Information Technology class covered by the Technology &

Enterprise curriculum framework. Students
are expected to have
intermediate
knowledge and experience in
the
operation of computer hardware and software. Some students may have
prior experience with programming, either through studying Logo in school or th
rough their own exploration. This program doesn’t require prior
programming experience. Students with prior experience should not lose interest as Scratch is geared toward student engagemen
t and
enjoyable tasks
.

Objectives
:

This program
aims to
introduc
e
students to the

concept
s

of programming

using Scratch
.
Students will develop
object oriented visual
programming skills which focus on the logical flow of commands,
object interaction, usability and real world interaction. Students will gain
experience in the use of common programming concepts such as
conditional

statements

and variables
, which

will

greatly assist their ability to
learn
languages with increased comple
xity in the upper school Computer Science WACE course.

Organisation:

The program
is structured to first teach the
functions of

Scratch through a seri
es

of tutorials that offer step by step guides and allow students to
gain understanding through explor
ation of
the software. Each tutorial builds on the preceding one with more complex functions.
Each tutorial
can be delivered to the class in segments, with the teacher explaining a few steps, then allowing time for the students to co
mplete them, before
mov
ing onto the next step. Or, if the class generally stays on task, the teacher can allow them to work through the tutorials at

their own pace
and circle the class providing one
-
on
-
one guidance where needed.


The assessments in the program are structured
in
a way that replicates how they may be presented in the

business world.
The task is set, and
then a challenge is given later. This unorthodox method allows students to focus on their
basic program, without being too overwhelmed by the
task at hand. Once the
y have a hold of their basic program, they can make changes to accommodate the challenging requirements. Ample time
is allowed for this. Time is also allowed for peer testing / quality control, which again is similar to the business world. T
he teacher shou
ld select
partners that aren’t working on the same style game o
r fairytale, to avoid copying.

The delivery of the major assessment makes use of the technology process. Students are first asked to investigate the require
ments of the task
in groups before d
evising their own plan. They then spend several lessons producing their program, before another student reviews it. At any
time, they will be encouraged to revision previous parts of the process. For example, if something isn’t working out in the p
roductio
n stage, they
may need to revisit their plan.

Assessments:

Task 1



Fairytale story



Create an animation to tell a fairytale story in Scratch. You may use any well
-
known fairytale, such as The Three Little Pigs or Red
Riding Hood.



Designed to

assess
students’ ability to animate in Scratch.



30
%


Task 2



Written Scratch test



20 multiple choice questions
.



Designed to
assess students’

theoretical knowledge of Scratch
.



2
0
%


Task 3



Interactive game



Create an interactive game in Scratch. You may develop
your game and rules, or make use of an existing game, for example, Space
Invaders or Brick.



Designed to
assess students’ programming skills



50%



Technology
Process

Materials

Information

Systems

Enterprise

Technology
Skills

Technology in
Society

Task 1

Fairytale story













Task 2

Written test














Task 3

Interactive game














Syllabus understandings address
ed
:


Technology Process



Students investigate by reflecting on what they already know about the problem or issue they are trying to solve or address.



Students devise ways of creating or modifying existing technology based on their understanding of and experience with the mat
erial
s, information products and
processes, and systems they use.



Students select and use skills and techniques appropriate to their understanding of the nature of materials, information and
systems.



Students review and evaluate information, processes, products, ideas, skills and techniques, considering their potential for
refinement.



Students
enhance their ability to be enterprising, such as, flexibility, adaptability and innovation when seeking and
realising opportunities.


Materials



Students select and use the appropriate materials based on their knowledge and understandings of the properties of materials.




Students apply organisational, operational and manipulative skills when selecting and using
materials.


Information



Students apply their knowledge of the form, structure and quality of information when developing creative and innovative solu
tions to challenges that meet individual
or community needs.



Students understand the impact of informatio
n, and are able to apply their understanding in meeting the requirements and specifications of challenges.



Students understand the importance of access to information by local, national and other communities, and the systems that su
pport access.


Systems



Students understand that systems are combinations of elements that include people and components functioning together to achi
eve specified goals.



Students apply their understanding of concepts associated with systems such as inputs, processes and outputs
; feedback; control mechanisms; efficiency; or open
and closed loops, to the selection, use, adaptation and control of systems.



Students
apply these understandings and relevant mathematical and scientific principles to the development and operation of sys
tems, and consider management,
operating and maintenance requirements when designing or modifying their technology.


Enterprise



While actively pursuing opportunities, students apply persistence, resourcefulness, creativity and boldness.



While engaged in
the technology process, students work towards common and changing goals.



Students participate in a competitive environment and have an understanding of the importance of maintaining a competitive lo
cal, national and international
advantage.


Technology
Skills



Students a
pply organisational skills when, for example, planning, communicating and managing resources and activities.



Students show competence and confidence with computers and acquire operational skills, knowledge and understanding of compute
r te
chnologies in a systematic
and structured way.



Students operate and manipulate technology in a safe and healthy working environment.


Technology in Society



Students
examine and develop their own beliefs, values and attitudes, while also using their under
standing of those held by individuals, families, groups and society.



Students are aware that technological developments inevitably have consequences.

Teaching and Learning Plan


Period

Content & Skills

Method

Resources

Products

Week 1,
period 1

Introduce topic and
aims

I
ntroduction to the concept of programming and its many uses in
and out of school. Show something cool in Scratch to spark
interest. Teach how Scratch fits in with the programming world,
and what other languages it can lead to.



Week 1,
period 2

Basics

Direct teaching of basic Scratch environment.

S
tage, sprites, controls etc




Week 1,
period 3

Drawing tools

Worksheet t
utorial


Drawing
worksheet

Students’ daily
work samples
(ongoing)

Week 1,
period 4

Animation

and
sound

Worksheet t
utorial


Animation

and
sound
worksheet


Week 2,
period 1

Conditional

statements

and
sensing

Direct teaching of mouse, keyboard and microphone input.
Webpage t
utorial

Conditional

statements

link


Week 2,
period 2

Pen and external
hardware

Scratch pen tutorial. Discuss how the program can interact with a
Scratch Board / PicoBoard.

Scratch tutorial
link
. Scratch
Board /
PicoBoard is
available.


Week 2,
period 3

Familiarisation

Scratch card activities

http://info.scratch.mit.edu/Support/Scrat
ch_Cards)

Scratch card
activity
worksheets


Week 2,
period 4

Set
Task 1

S
et
fairytale task:

T
ell

a

fairytale story,
e.g.

three little pigs or red riding hood


Task 1 task
sheets


Week 3,
period 1

Task 1 work

Continue task



Week 3,
period 2

Task 1 c
hallenge

Have students in
troduce interaction in
their

sto
ries
, e.g. c
lick to
continue, choose your own adventure, blow into microphone to
make wolf blow down pigs' houses.



Week 3,
period 3

Task 1

work

Continue T
ask

1



Week 3,
period 4

Task 1

work

Complete T
ask

1


Students’
Scratch
fairytales

Week 4,
period 1

Share
Task 1
solutions

S
hare interesting fairytale creations with the class



Week 4,
period 2

Investigation

Research uses for scratch, e.g. g
ames, education, informative.
Find examples of
interesting and unique Scratch programs.


Research
findings

Week 4,
period 3

V
ariables

and lists

Variables webpage t
utorial

and lists Scratch tutorial

Variables link
and lists
Scratch
link


Week 4,
period 4

Sensing and
b
roadcast
ing

Youtube t
utorial

Sensing and
broadcasting
Youtube

link


Week 5,
period 1

Revision



Revision note
s

Week 5,
period 1

Task 2
-

Test

Written test

Task 2 task
sheets and

test

Students’ test
answers

Week 5,
period 3

Game creation

V
ideo tutorial

-

make
basic P
ong game

Video
tutorial


Week 5,
period 4

Introduce
Task 3

work

S
et assessment.

Have students

brainstorm what
they

are required
to do, and how it could be done

in groups.

Task 3 task

sheets

Group
brainstorms

Week 6,
period 1

Plan
Task 3

Students should
settle on
their
o
wn idea
s

and create a storyboard
for it

Game design
worksheets

Storyboards

Week 6,
period 2

Task 3

work

Have students begin to
put together
the
basics of

their

project
s
.
i.e.
stage, sprites, controls



Week 6,
period 3

Task 3

work

W
ork individually on
project
s



Week 6,
period 4

Task 3

work

W
ork individually on project
s



Week 7,
period 1

Task 3

work

W
ork individually on project
s



Week 7,
period 2

Task 3

work

Have students l
ook for tutorials that may help
their

project
s


List of online
tutorials to
help
major
assessment

Week 7,
period 3

Task 3

work

W
ork individually on project
s



Week 7,
period 4

Task 3

work

W
ork individually on project
s



Week 8,
period 1

Task 3

work

W
ork individually on project
s



Week 8,
period 2

Task 3 c
hallenge

Have students

begin to p
ut intelligence into

their

project
s

(eg.
scoring for
their

game
s
)



Week 8,
period 3

Task 3

work

W
ork individually on project
s



Week 8,
period 4

Task 3

work

W
ork individually on project
s



Week 9,
period 1

Task 3

work

W
ork individually on
project
s



Week 9,
period 2

Task 3
work

W
ork individually on project
s



Week 9,
period 3

Peer testing

Quality control. H
ave other students test
each other’s work, and
see if they can find bugs. They can then make any needed
changes.



Week 9,
period 4

Task 3

work

W
ork individually t
o fix errors and polish projects




Week 10,
period 1

Task 3

work

W
ork individually t
o fix errors and polish projects




Week 10,
period 2

Showcase
Task 3

P
roject
s due at start of lesson. D
emonstrate project
s

to class


Students’
Scratch

game

projects

Week 10,
period 3

Showcase
Task 3

D
emonstrate project
s

to class



Week 10,
period 4

Showcase
Task 3

D
emonstrate project
s

to class




References


Chiang, J. (n.d).

Scratch game design black sheet
. Retrieved from
http://www.scribd.com/doc/17366391/Scratch
-
Game
-
Design
-
Blank
-
Sheet

Curriculum Council (1998).
Curriculum framework
. Western Australia.

Curriculum Council (2005).
Curriculum framework curriculum guide


technology and enterprise
. Western Australia.

HD123 (2
011).

Pen block tutorial (12)
. Retrieved from
http://scratch.mit.edu/projects/HD123/2056670

Massachusetts Institute of Teachnology
(n.d).

Scratch
cards
. Retrieved from
http://info.scratch.mit.edu/Support/Scratch_Cards

Michaud (n.d).

Introduction to scratch
: exercise 2
. Retrieved from
http://nebomusic.net/scratchlesson1/scratchexercise2.html

Michaud (n.d).

Introduction to scratch: exercise 3
. Retrieved from
http://nebomusic.net/scratchlesson1/scratchexercise3.html

Paddle2See (2008).

List tutorial.
Retrieved
from
http://scratch.mit.edu/projects/Paddle2See/260208

Shall We Learn (n.d).

Scratch lessons
. Retrieved from
http://shallwelearn.com/joomla/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&id=9&Itemid=20

Ssseane (2008).

Quiz time 1 scratch programming.
Retrieved

from http://scratch.mit.edu/projects/ssseane/131959

Worcester Public Library (2011).

Lesson 3


sensing and boardcasting.
Retrieved from
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WAIKC35sYME&feature=related