Responses from the Advice Consultation

connectionviewΤεχνίτη Νοημοσύνη και Ρομποτική

17 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 10 μήνες)

68 εμφανίσεις


Westminster City Council


Advice Services Consultation



1







Responses from the Advice
Consultation







October 2012



September

2012



Westminster City Council


Advice Services Consultation



2

Intr
oduction

This report details
the
feedback
the council

rec
eived from the Advice Services C
onsultation
between 30 May 2012 and 22 August 2012.



Independent advice services will need to change. Big changes, such as the Government’s reforms
of the welfare system, are expected to cause a rise in demand for advice. At the same time, local
govern
ment funding is falling and the council must make its resources go further.


The consultation sought service users’ and providers’ views on options for how the council can re
-
design the way it commissions independent advice services so that provision is:




Efficient and delivers value for money



Of an even higher quality



Even more accessible to the people who need it moist



More joined up



Over 132 respon
ses from individuals and organis
ations were receive
d. Your feedback
will inform
the design of a new ad
v
ice service that is fit to meet future

challenges while delivering better value
for money.



This report is available to download from the council website:
www.westminster.gov.uk/services/healthandsocialcare/adultservices/advice
-
services/
.


It is also available in
hard copy from Westminster
Action for Volun
tary Engagement by contacting:

Fergus McLardy


Fergus@btob.co.uk


020 7697 1972








Westminster City Council


Advice Services Consultation



3


How we asked for your views

The consultation was held over a 12 weeks period (as committed to in the Westminster Compact)
between 30
th

May and 22
nd

August.

124 people responded to the consultation via an online form.

Eight responses

were received

either by post or by email from service providers
.
103 service users attended workshops hosted
by existing advice providers


How we let you know about the consulta
tion

All currently funded providers were contacted b
y email, with a letter
from Robyn Fairman, Assistant
Chief Executive. The letter alerted organisations to the consultation; the workshop dates for
providers; and also asked if providers would be willing
to host consultation workshops with their
service users. Other providers not funded by the Council were also sent an email to let them know
about the consultation. The consultation was also advertised in the Westminster Reporter,
Westminster Plus and the

Voluntary Action Westminster e
-
newsletter. Westminster Citizen’s
Advice Bureau also distributed information about the consultation to the Westminster Advice
Forum.

Workshops
with providers

Two

workshops were held with providers
on
27 June and 12 July
2012
.
These were

attended
by
eight organisations:

Fitzrovia Neighbourhood Association

Migrant’s Resource Centre

Westminster Citizen’s Advice Bureau

Age⁃ n捥牮rtes瑭in獴sr

Ma特汥lone⁂ang污lesh⁓o捩c瑹

AO⁄ m楮楯n
-

Bee瑨oven⁃ n瑲t

madding瑯n
iaw⁃ n瑲t

A捴楯n 景爠rh楬d牥r


A⁲ 捯牤⁷a猠步p琠o映瑨e feedba捫⁧楶en⁢y⁰牯r楤i牳⁡nd 晥d⁩n瑯 瑨i猠牥po牴⸠⁈ 牤⁣rp楥猠of⁴he
捯n獵汴a瑩tn document⁷e牥⁡汳漠d楳瑲ibuted and p牯ri
de牳⁷e牥⁥n捯u牡red⁴o⁲ 獰ond⁳epa牡re汹
楮iw物瑩tg⸠






Westminster City Council


Advice Services Consultation



4

Workshops with service users

Five workshops were held with
103
service users

in total
. At each workshop council off
ic
ers
presented th
e consultation document and then
held a question and answer session. Service
users’ views were recorded and fed into thi
s report. Hard copies of the consultation document
were also distributed and service users were
encouraged

to respond.

Where speakers of English as a second language attended, translation services were provided.

Date

Venue

Number of service users

16 July

Fitzrovia Neighbourhood Association

9

17 July

Age Concern Westminster

40


27 July

Paddington Law Centre

27


15 August

Marylebone Bangladesh Society

3

16 August

Migrant’s resource centre




Written responses

Two consultation documents
(one for providers and one for service users) were available to
download from the council’s website and in hard cop
y.

Providers and service users could also respond to the consultation via an on
-
line form.




Westminster City Council


Advice Services Consultation



5


SECTION 1
:
SERVICE USERS



Who responded?


80% of respondents
had received advice before. Among those, almost a third (32%) had received
advice on welfare benefits, a fifth (22%) advice on housing and just over a tenth on translation
(12%)
, Working Tax C
redit (11%) and pensions (11%).

Just
over a fifth of respondents (23%) described themselves as British with the other biggest
groups self
-
identified as Chinese (19%), Bangladeshi (11%) and Arab (8%)
. 61% of the
respondents were female and 39%
male


Over a third (38%) of respondents were age
d over 60, 35% were aged 25
-

44, 25% 45


49.
Under 1% of respondents were aged 16


24.

A quarter (23%) of respondents described themselves as retired and just under a fifth (18%) as
permanently sick or dis
abled. 15% of respondents worked
full time,
8% work
ed
part time and 8%
were jobseekers.

The

majority of residents
described

themselves as either having lived in Westminster for over 20
years (33%)

or having always lived here (20%). Only 6% of residents h
ad lived in Westminster for
less
than 2 yea
rs.

The majority of respondents described themselves as suffering from ill health, with 45% saying that
health problems had limited their day
-
to
-
day activities a lot in the last 12 months.

Full details of who responded are set out in Annex 1.










Westminster City Council


Advice Services Consultation



6

What you said

Key themes



Service users value
personalised advice provided in familiar, accessible, community
-
based locations
, with language provision highlighted as a key accessibility requirement



Service users value
advice that is provided flexibly and

tailored to their needs
.


There
was a strong preference against services that were seen to provide a ‘one size fits all’
approach




Service users emphasised the importance of
immigration advice

to help newly arrived
immigrants find work and housing quickl
y, preventing them from placing greater demand on
services in the future



There was a
s
trong preference for face
-
to
-
face advice among more vulnerable service
-
users
.


Service users with lower levels of needs, particularly those who worked, emphasised
the ne
ed for an accessible telephone line and website



Service users value advice that can be provided promptly in one sessio
n.


There were
high levels of dissatisfaction where service users were asked to wait for long periods only to
be given an appointment to
return at a later date.


Conversely, service users were happy to
wait for long periods if they felt part or all of their problem would be dealt with as a result



Service users felt it was important that the advice they received delivered a
positive
outcome
.


However, they also highly valued a service that they felt understood their issues
and reduced their anxiety.




Users and providers were divided in their opinion of whether the service should be open to
all or elements open to all and other parts open t
o distinct groups. Alongside this the
majority of respondents thought the
priority for advice services should be to help the
most vulnerable people




Service users wanted the service to be available in
community centres
, with
communication of the new servi
ce critical to its accessibility.












Westminster City Council


Advice Services Consultation



7


Your r
esponses to
the
consultation questions

Consultation question

Which option do you think the council should choose?

Option1
:
A service which is open to everyone

Option2
:
A service where part of the service is open to everyone, and where other parts of the
service are available to the following groups of people only for; Parents who use services in
Children’s Centres; Older people; Adults who have a mental illness


What y
ou said


The majority of respondents
(53%)
preferred
option

1
-

a service which is open to everyone.

The
remainder (47%) s
upported
option 2


a
service
where part of the service is open to everyone, and
where other parts of the service are available to

the most vulnerable.


A range of reasons were cited by respondents for their answer.

Option 1

Option 2


A⁣ mp牥ren獩se⁳ 牶r捥⁷楬氠牥love⁴he
獴楧maf⁩  獴sbe楮i 景爠ru汮l牡r汥lpeop汥



bveryoneeed猠he汰land adv楣i




A汬⁰eople⁳ ou汤lhave

equa氠物gh瑳





Th楳⁷a
y⁥veryone⁷楬l⁧e琠瑨e⁳ 牶楣攬
mos琠
業po牴an瑬t⁴he peop汥lwhoeed⁩  獴



Mo牥⁴業e and focu猠景爠瑨e needy


‘Giving providers the freedom to tailor their
services to the most venerable’














Westminster City Council


Advice Services Consultation



8

Features of the new
service

-

Location and accessibility

Consultation question

Where would you like to receive advice services?


What you said




2%

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

4%

8%

8%

16%

17%

17%

19%

0
5
10
15
20
Fitzrovia Court
At your local GP
At sport centres
Larger supermarkets
Advice centres
At a church hall
Dedicated specialist centre
At the Citizens Advice Bureau
Libraries
The Chinese community centre
The Paddington Law Centre
At home
A community centre

Westminster City Council


Advice Services Consultation



9


Consultation question

What do you think prevents people from using the service?


What you said












3%

1%

1%

1%

2%

2%

2%

2%

3%

9%

20%

23%

34%

0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
Nothing
Seen “not for them” only for vulnerable people

Trust
Lack of good service places
Scared of being turned away
Having to pay for services
Fear and isolation
Intimidation of place
Opening times reduced
Shortage of staff /long queues
Language problems
Lack of easy access/travelling
Not aware of services

Westminster City Council


Advice Services Consultation



10

Consultation question

What do you think we should do to make sure advice services are accessible to everyone?






1%

1%

1%

1%

1%

1%

1%

2%

2%

3%

3%

5%

5%

6%

7%

7%

10%

11%

14%

18%

21%

0
5
10
15
20
25
Listen to what residents ask of you
More drop in sessions
Services available for people who need them
Higher quality of advice
Make them free
Put more funding and resource in CAB offices
Involve local community groups
Reallocate resources amongst existing providers
Clear contact details
Ensure council website is friendly
Already excellent/good
More home visits
More awareness of services
More workers
Have better access for those with disabilities/elderly
Advisors who speak different language
Details posted in accessible locations
-

doctor’s


Longer opening times/more drop in sessions
Have accessible advice centres located
More funding to be made available
Invest in advertising

Westminster City Council


Advice Services Consultation



11

Features of the new service
-

Continued strong demand

Consultation question

Which of
the four

ideas listed
do you think we should
adopt, if any?


What you said




33%

of respondents said
advice services
should
focus on social welfare issues
,
such as
benefits, debt, housing and employment, which have
t
he biggest impact on wellbeing




23%

of respondents said advice services should be made
available to
Westminster residents
only

and not

people

who work in Westminster




23%

of respondents thought
advice should be given

over the phone

and web for people
who do not require face
-
to
-
face appointm
ents to reduce costs




21%

of respondents said a system should be used

to

assess people’s needs before any
advice is given

so that only those with the greatest needs are seen by an adviser face to face


Consultation question

Do you have any other ideas on

how to reduce the demand for advice?


What you said



Westminster City Council


Advice Services Consultation



12


Consultation question

Do you think the priority for advice services should be?



To help the most vulnerable people



To help the greatest number of people irrespective of their need



Don’t know



Neither


What you said









9%

3%

31%

57%

0
10
20
30
40
50
60
Don’t know

Neither
To help the greatest number of people irrespective
of their need
To help the most vulnerable people

Westminster City Council


Advice Services Consultation



13

SECTION 2

Providers’ consultation


Consultation question

What service model should the Council chose?

1.

One contract (Open Access and tailored provision)

2.

Three contracts (Open Access and tailored provision)

3.

One contract
(Open Access only)


What you said

Service Model

Number of
votes
1


Key issues highlighted in responses

Option One

(One contract: Open
Access and tailored
provision)

2



Service users fall into a mix of groups and this
contract looks like it would cover

the need of
people who speak different languages



This option would work well if a triage assessment
model was adopted



Offers clarity and a more joined
-
up advice services
contract

Option Two

(Three contracts:
Open Access and
tailored provision)

3



Would enable agencies to work together in a
constructive consortium.



This option would work well if a triage assessment
model was adopted



Distinct client groups will be reflected in this model,
with an integrated and consistent service offer
available fo
r each client group.

Option Three

(One contract: Open

Access only)

1



Allows for open, fair and accessible advice
provision to all groups, rather than restricting
provision.





1

Some providers did not explicitly choose a service model option but rather provided additional data on their service.
Equally some providers chose to equally rank two options and this is reflected in the table above.


Westminster City Council


Advice Services Consultation



14



Opinions were mixed amongst the providers that responded to the consultation as to the
best service model to adopt. There was
recognition

that until a detailed service
specification had been drawn up it was difficult to

assess

which service model may be m
ost
appropriate.

Features of the service model

Consultation question
s


What types of community delivery locations do you think will improve accessibility?

What barriers do you perceive exist which may prevent different groups of people accessing
advice
services?

How can we overcome these barriers to ensure that advice services are accessible to everyone?


What you said



The need for a

variety of channels of access were highlighted by providers, with the
recognition that face
-
to
-
face advice should be prioritised
to help those most in need and
unable to access advice in other locations




All respondents recognised the need to provide an e
lement of outreach provision,

including
a home visiting service,

whilst at the same time stressing the cost
implications of outreach
work





Service users value personalised advice provided in familiar, accessible, community
-
based
locations, with language
provision highlighted as a key accessibility requirement. Delivery
locations linked to a health setting were also highlighted

as being crucial

to attracting elderly
clients.

The integration with other services was a theme which was recognised by a number

of providers in their submissions.





Overcoming barriers to accessing services will be built on continuing and ongoing
engagement with service users, coupled with working alongside existing public services
providers to minimise the levels of failure de
mand




Equality and inclusivity are integral to the design of service provision to ensure advice
services are accessible to all. Key measures which were emphasised as being crucial to
the service design were communications, language provision, cultural sen
sitivities and
mitigating the potential risk of digital exclusion.




Westminster City Council


Advice Services Consultation



15

Managing Demand

Consultation questions

What are the best ways to manage demand?

What are the reasons for your answer?

Do you think the priority for advice services should be to help
the most vulnerable or to help the
greatest number of people irrespective of need?

How can we work together to tackle failure demand caused by us and other organisations, such as
DWP?

What you said



A triage model to assess need was highlighted as a best practice model by a number of
respondents.



The importance of balancing managing demand with an increase in return visitors to the
advice service was highlighted by one provider as a potential risk.

The importance of
preventative advice, and the consequences of not providing appropriate advice early, was
highlighted by a number of respondents.





There was a recognition that Westminster City Council needs to manage demand for advice
provision, howev
er the definition of “resident in Westminster” was highlighted as too narrow,
and it was recommended that this be amended to “living in Westminster”. This change
would allow for new arrivals, temporary resident and the homeless to access advice
provision,

in line with service user feedback.

Some respondents however felt that
Westminster residents should be the prime beneficiaries of advice services funded by
Westminster City Council.





The need to have a level of service opened to all,
that was accessi
ble was emphasis
ed in
all responses, with some providers stressing the need to provide tailore
d, specialis
ed advice
to those groups identified as being in greatest need.

Triage models where recommended
by a number of respondents to determine the most appr
opriate level of help needed.





Restricting services to those focused on social welfare issues it was felt by the majority of
respondents would impact on the effectiveness and quality of advice. Whilst recognised as
a high priority
[75 votes out of 226

in service user feedback] it was felt that generalist advice
should remain. There should also be some flexibility to allow advice providers to deal with
holistic advice needs, where these go beyond social welfare issues. A percentage
allowance of “toler
ances” on the main categories o
f advice would assist with this




Westminster City Council


Advice Services Consultation



16



One provider stressed the important distinction between signposting and referral, with the
latter often built on an agreed protocol to transfer the cases.




Providers were divided in their opinion as to whether the service should be prioritised for the
most vulnerable or helping the greatest number of people irrespective of need. There was
recognition

amongst providers however that prioritization in some form

was necessary

due
to the challenging financial context.




Proper training and knowledge were highlighted as crucial to tackling failure demand for
advice provision, with advice services paying a critical role in highlighting issues in existing
services.

Greater structured partnership working would also go some way to tackling
failure demand.

Additional questions



Securing client feedback as part of the ongoing evaluation into service provision was
highlighted as an excellent way to evaluate the success o
f the new service.




The monitoring of advice services should be smart, efficient and proportionate.

This will
enable commissioners to learn what works and continually improve the service.



The council
would like to thank service providers and service

users who took the time to fill in
this consultation.





Westminster City Council


Advice Services Consultation



17

Annex 1
: who responded to the survey?


If yes, please tell us the type of advice you have received below

Number of
responses

Welfare Benefits

32

Housing

22

Translation

12

Working Tax credit

11

Pension

11

Housing benefit

8

Employment advice

8

Debt

5

Paddington Law Centre

5

Council Tax

5

Pension credit

4

Child benefit

3

Child Tax credit

3

Legal

3

Income maximisation

2

Immigration

2

Attendance allowance

2

Taxi cards

2

Utility bills

2

Health

2

Business advice

1

Home noise reduction

1

Tenant allowance

1

Rent

1

Disability benefit

1

Radio license

1

Freedom pass

1

Care service

1

Repair works

1

Financial

1





Westminster City Council


Advice Services Consultation



18


Is there

anything else you would like to tell us?

Number of
responses

Happy with service

9

Paddington Law Centre
-

give them as much support and funding as possible

5

Most vulnerable should be helped, but service should not be limited to them

3

If advice can be given in a community centre then accessible to all

Holistic services

3

CAB provides much needed help

2

Compare providers so they are not wasting money

1

Try an NHS approach, where not everyone gets the same benefit but the
benefit i
s there if and when you need it

1

Fitzrovia Neighbourhood Centre is really good, gives a lot of help

1

Advice should not be restricted to disability/elderly

1

Bi
-
lingual speakers

1

Find individuals who can offer grants for the good of the community

1

Face to face advice gives reassurance and am satisfied

1

Without this advice would not have been able to start my business

1

Great need for advice and support in the north of the borough

1

Should ask why advice has declined

1

Westminster Benefits team should be expanded to help vulnerable people
more

1






















Westminster City Council


Advice Services Consultation



19

Gender



Age






39%

61%

0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
Male
Female
38%

25%

35%

1%

0
10
20
30
40
60+
45-59
25-44
16-24

Westminster City Council


Advice Services Consultation



20

Work status


How long have you lived in the Westminster City Council area?




6%

6%

7%

7%

7%

8%

16%

18%

23%

0
5
10
15
20
25
Other
Unemployed-not registered-…
Retired and disabled
Registered unemployed
At home/looking after family
Working part time (8-29 hours)
Working full time (30 hours)
Permanently sick/disabled
Retired
3%

6%

9%

10%

10%

10%

17%

34%

0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
Other
1 to 2 years
11 to 15 years
3 to 5 years
6m to 10 years
16 to 20 years
Always lived here
More than 20 years

Westminster City Council


Advice Services Consultation



21


Are your day
-
to
-
day activities limited because of a
health problem or disadvantage
which has lasted, or is expected to last, at least 12 months?





18%

37%

46%

0
10
20
30
40
50
Yes, limited a little
No
Yes, limited a lot