PKG 491 PACKAGING AND RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION

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27 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 8 μήνες)

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PKG 491



PACKAGING AND RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION


PKG 4
91
.

3(2
-
2) Prerequisite:
None
. The integrated study of packaging and
radio
frequency identification (RFID)
. Interrelationship of products,
materials,
packaging
,
warehousing and supply chain issues,
and quality issues

on radio frequency equipment
and readability
.


Also, a

general

introduction to Automatic Identification elem
ents and
workings.

This course is set up for any discipline involved in business, logistics, supply
chain management or packaging, provided there is a curiosity about how these practices
can all benefit from a new technological process.


Course Descripti
on

To teach the fundamentals of
radio frequency identification

and how this technology
can be used in practical business applications, with a focus on packaging concerns
.


The course meets for four

(
4
) hours each week;
one

(1) two hour lecture period

and
a two (2) hour laboratory period. The laboratory periods will be used for
RFID

applications
and related exercises.
The course will also require the students to begin a journal for RFID
issues in the field of their choice and prepare a paper or present
ation
on this subject at the
end of the semester.


The course description will be fulfilled as follows:

1.
Introduction to Automatic Identification

--

Production
and business
applications for
bar codes, radio frequency, magnetic stripe, biometrics, voice

and optical character
recognition
.


2.

Introduction to Radio Frequency Identification



An overview will help the students
learn about the components

of RFID
, frequencies of interest, interface protocols,
legal
issues
and various groups involved in setting procedures, standards and best
practices.


3.

Application of RFID



Any RFID application has certain components in common. This
is true whether tracking inventories or assets, people or packages, warehouse or
supply

chain information, or kids at amusement parks.
This is the key aspect of this
class and most of the labs will involve hands
-
on work to cement these ideas.


4.
Barriers to Adoption

--

The functions of typical packaging
materials

and the
impact
they have o
n successful RFID

operation.

This

will

also

be
covered in the
lab and
lecture presentations.


5.
Industry Applications

-

A brief introduction to
c
ommon methods for
RFID in various
industries
.

Among these will be automotive, food and produce, pharmaceuti
cals,
consumer product goods,
military, and others as apply
.


Lecture:
W



6:00


7:50

p.m.

-

Room 22
1
Natural Resources

Instructor:
Dr. Robb Clarke, 151 Packaging Bldg., 355
-
7613, clarker@msu.edu


Office Hrs:
Tuesday




4:00


5:00 p.m.

Wednesday
& Thursday



10:20
-

11:1
0 a.m.




Or, by appointment.




Misconduct

Academic misconduct by a student shall include, but not be limited to: disruption of
classes, giving and receiving unauthorized aid on exams or in the p
reparation and
reporting of lab assignments, unauthorized removal of materials from the library or reading
room, or knowingly misrepresenting the source of any academic work.
This is especially
true of plagiarism on reports and projects
; ANY instance of pl
agiarism will result in a grade
of zero for the course
.

Academic misconduct by the instructor shall include, but not be limited to: grading
student work by criteria other than academic performance, or repeated and willful neglect
in the discharge of duly

assigned academic duties.



Required Texts

There will be no required text for this course, though handouts and assigned readings will
be given on a regular basis. Students should expect to sign up for on
-
line
journals relating
to the issues of the week. As such, access to a computer is required, as is knowledge of
basic programs like PowerPoint and Excel.



Examinations/Grading






Percent

Homework








10

Firs
t Hour Test, Wednesday,
October 20






15


Semester Project

Due

-

December 1




2
0

Project Presentation

Due



December 8




10

Final Exam,
Wednesday

December

15, 8:00


10:00 p
.m.

20


Machinery/Laboratory Exercises


25




Total



100


The class average will receive a grade of no less than 2.5. However, you must earn 60%
(180 pts) t
o pass the course.

T
he class will be graded on a curve
, so every point is
important if you plan on a high grade
.


Written labs are due at the VERY START of the laboratory period. Labs that are not
turned in at this time will be considered late if there
was no prior consent by the instructor.
T
wo points will be deducted for each day that Lab Reports are late.


All exam point negotiations must be within 1 week following the return of graded material.
If you have a concern, write a short, thorough explana
tion and hand it in to the professor.

Exams can be taken early (which might require some forethought) but
CAN
NOT

be made
up after the scheduled time without PRIOR approval. A missed exam without approval will
result in a zero points.