VCE Subject Handbook - Mount Saint Joseph Girls College.

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2 0 1 4 V C E/V E T/V C A L C o u r s e S e l e c t i o n Ha n d b o o k




MOUNT ST. JOSEPH GIRLS’ COLLEGE


MSJ |
2014

VCE/VET/VCAL Course Selection

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1






Cont
e
nts

Message from the Principal

................................
................................
................................
..........
3

Planning Your Pathway in the Senior Years

................................
................................
...................
4

Timeline

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................................
................................
................................
.......
5

Key Personnel

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................................
..............................
6

Pathways at MSJ

................................
................................
................................
..........................
7

Pathway One
-

VCE
................................
................................
................................
.......................
8

Pathway Two


VET/VCE

................................
................................
................................
............

10

Pathway Three


VCAL

................................
................................
................................
...............

11

Pathways

One & Two

................................
................................
................................
.................

15

Undertaking Accelerated Studies in Year 11

................................
................................
...............

16

VCE Studies Available

................................
................................
................................
.................

18

Religious Education

................................
................................
................................
............................

19

Religion

& Society

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................................
................................
................................
.....

20

Texts & Traditions

................................
................................
................................
................................
.....

21

Religion and Society through the Arts
-

Unit 1

................................
................................
.........................

22

Language

................................
................................
................................
................................
...........

23

English/English as an Additional Language or Dialect (EALD)

................................
................................
...

24

English Language

................................
................................
................................
................................
.......

25

Literature

................................
................................
................................
................................
..................

27

LOTE


French, Italian & Japanese
................................
................................
................................
.......

28

French

................................
................................
................................
................................
.......................

28

Italian

................................
................................
................................
................................
........................

28

Japanese
................................
................................
................................
................................
....................

28

Health & Physical Education

................................
................................
................................
...............

30

Health and Human Development

................................
................................
................................
.............

30

Physical Education

................................
................................
................................
................................
....

31

Humanities

................................
................................
................................
................................
........

33

Accounting

................................
................................
................................
................................
................

33

Business
Management

................................
................................
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..............................

34

History

................................
................................
................................
................................
.......................

36

Australian History

................................
................................
................................
................................
.....

37

Revolution
s

................................
................................
................................
................................
...............

38

Global Politics

................................
................................
................................
................................
...........

38

Legal Studies

................................
................................
................................
................................
.............

40

Mathematics

................................
................................
................................
................................
.....

41

Foundation Mathematics Units 1 and 2

................................
................................
................................
...

41

General Mathematics Units 1 and 2

................................
................................
................................
.........

41

General Mathematics Advanced Units 1 and 2

................................
................................
........................

42

Mathematical Methods (CAS) Units 1 and 2

................................
................................
............................

42

Mathematical Methods Units (CAS) 3 and 4

................................
................................
............................

42

Further Mathematics Units 3 and 4

................................
................................
................................
..........

42

Specialist Mathematics Units 3 and 4

................................
................................
................................
.......

42




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VCE/VET/VCAL Course Selection

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Science

................................
................................
................................
................................
..............

44

Biology

................................
................................
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......................

44

Chemistry

................................
................................
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................................
..................

45

Environmental Science

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.............................

46

Physics

................................
................................
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.......................

48

Psychology

................................
................................
................................
................................
................

49

Technology

................................
................................
................................
................................
........

51

Design and Technology
-

Textiles

................................
................................
................................
..............

51

Food and Technology

................................
................................
................................
................................

52

Information Technology

................................
................................
................................
...........................

54

Visual & Performing Arts

................................
................................
................................
....................

56

Drama

................................
................................
................................
................................
.......................

56

VET VCE Interactive Di
gital Media

................................
................................
................................
............

57

Certificate III in Music

................................
................................
................................
...............................

58

Media

................................
................................
................................
................................
........................

59

Studio Arts

................................
................................
................................
................................
................

60

Visual Communica
tion and Design

................................
................................
................................
...........

62






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VCE/VET/VCAL Course Selection

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Message from the Principal


Dear Senior MSJ Students,


As you move on through the year levels at MSJ you will notice you are given more opportunity to
choose a course of study that will best develop your particular skills and talents. This happens
because as you get older you learn more about yourself and how

you learn best. You also become
aware of areas of study and careers that may appeal to you and suit your talents.


So as you read through this handbook keep an open mind about all learning areas and be sure to
read about all subjects on offer. At Mount

St Joseph Girls’ College we pride ourselves on the
manner in which young women learn to think independently. An example of this independent
thinking is the need for each of you to choose a course of study that suits you best rather than a
course that keep
s you close to your particular circle of friends.


Each of you has unique skills and talents so you need to reflect on your past successes and future
goals and identify the subjects that will develop and bring out the best in you. Spend the time to
think

about and talk with family, friends and staff members with respect to the career direction you
may like to follow. Most will not know exactly what path they wish to follow but having options in
mind will inform you to make wise choices about your subjects
. Most importantly, you need to be
future focussed in your course selection not just what migh
t be easiest or most fun in
2014

but
what will serve you best and develop your gifts most for your future years.


Read and think carefully and always remember tha
t the Holy Spirit and Mary MacKillop are always
guiding us.


God bless,


Cath Dillon

Principal












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VCE/VET/VCAL Course Selection

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Planning Your Pathway in the Senior

Years


Next year you will be commencing the final two years of your secondary schooling. You will be
completing
either VCE (Victorian Certificate of Education) or VCAL (Victorian Certificate of Applied
Learning). You may also be studying a VET (Vocational Education and Training) subject.


Right now you need to start thinking about the pathways you can take over the
next two years to
achieve your goals. We encourage you to discuss your choices with your teachers and the Careers
and Pathways Co
-
ordinator. You should also discuss your proposed pathways with your parents.


We have prepared this booklet to help you to pla
n your
two
-
year

study program and to answer
some of the questions about the VCE and VCAL. Please make sure that you read the information
carefully and ask questions about anything you do not understand. It is important that you and your
parents attend the
Senior
Course

Selection Evening on the 19
th of
July
.
You

will
be
provide
d with

information about the programs that are available at Mount St Joseph Girls' College and how you
will be guided through the subject selection and pathways planning process. Doma
in Leaders, VCE
and VCAL subject teachers and Year 11 and 12 students will be available to answer any questions
you have about the different pathways and the various studies that are offered in the College.


Finally, it is important that you are aware of
the timelines for the
Course

Selection process and that
you meet all of the required deadlines. A summary of the process and the schedule follows.


Good luck with your thinking a
nd your planning for the future.



Mr
s

Joanna De

Bono







M
s
Narelle Layton

Deputy Principal


Learning and Teaching

Director of Learning
and

Teaching




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VCE/VET/VCAL Course Selection

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Timeline


In order to complete your
course
selection for
2014
, it is important that you work through the
following process.

You need to:




Think about your abilities, interests and academic achievements in various subjects.




Read this
2014

VCE
/VCAL

Handbook (also
posted on the in
tranet under
Course

Selection
Online
icon)
. The booklet includes an overview of t
he VCE Program and description
of
the subjects to assist
you in making choices.




Consider whether you are best suited to a VCE, VCE
/VET or VCAL pathway in Year 11
and 12 at MSJ.




Identify which s
tudies

you wish to complete in
2014
.




Complete the Year 11 or Year 12
2014

Course

Selection Form.

This form will be supplied in an
assembly and a sample paper copy is contained in this docu
ment.




Obtain your on
-
line course
selection password that will be supplied in an Assembly.




Enter your
Course Selection

into the Online
Course Selection

Software on the Intranet
for
Semesters 1 and 2. Note that you need to click on the icon, and work th
rough the process.




Print two copies of your selections at the end of the process and ask your parents to sign both
copies.




Submit one signed printout to your Pastoral Group Teacher and keep one for yourself.

Notes:

Every endeavour will be made to accommodate your
course selection

however the College retains
the right to withdraw an elective if there are insufficient student numbers. Students will be notified
if they need to reselect any
subjects
.


Year 11

students

m
ust complete the
2014

Course

Selection Form

and submit it to your
Pastoral
Group Leader by

August
20, 2013
.


Year 12 students

must complete the
2014

Course

Selection Form

and submit it to your Pastoral
Group Leader by
August
20
, 2013.








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VCE/VET/VCAL Course Selection

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Key Personnel

Principal

Catherine Dillon

Deputy Principal


Learning and Teaching

Assistant

Principal


Student Wellbeing

Joanna De Bono

Anna Keppel

Director of Mission

Michael Leonard

Director of Digital Leaning

Fran Dorgan

Director of Learning and Teaching

College Organiser


Narelle Layton

Leonie MacNaughtan

Domain Leaders



English

Mark Stracey

Maths

Anil Krishna

Science

Mia Loft

Humanities

Gerry Pinto

Performing Arts

Belinda Sorbello

Visual Arts

David Meilak

LOTE


Technology

Tonya Nicholls

Health / Physical Education

Courtney Baka

Religious Education

Spiros Zarkos




Co
-
ordinators


VCAL

Tania Vranes

Teacher Development
Coordinator

Personalised Learning Coordinator

Mark Stracey

Matthew Smith

Individual Differences

Helen Thomas

ESL/Literacy

Patricia Canavan

e
-
learning

Adam Gonzalez

VASS

Moira Pavicic

Careers Pathways

Jacqui Krell


Year 12

Stacey Bourke

Year 11

Clare Kubacki

Year 10

Lidia Morlin

Year 9

Cherie Meurant

Year 8

Emma
-
May Litchfield

Year 7

Alison Duncan

Student Support Services


Counsellors


Susha Arnheim

Sharyn D'Souza




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VCE/VET/VCAL Course Selection

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VCAL

3
-

4 Days a week of clas
ses at the College,

1
-

2 Days per week of Pre
-
Apprenticeship/
VET/ASBA


For students who wish to go into the workforce,
go into specific TAFE courses or obtain an
apprenticeship or traineeship.

Competency based with no exams.


VCE

5 days per week of
classes

ATAR score to go to Higher Education


For students who wish to undertake an academic
study with exams and go onto further study.


End of year exams for all subjects.

Higher Education

Students apply through VTAC while in Year 12 to
a
Tertiary Institution/TAFE or private provider to
complete a higher education degree, diploma or
certificate course.

Work / TAFE / Apprenticeship


Students will have skills and
experience to gain
access to the workplace, TAFE courses and to
apply for apprenticeships.


Students still have the opportunity to access
Higher Education at a later date if they wish to.

Work

Students enter the workforce after

Completing 3
-
6 years of study
.

Pathways

at MSJ


The term ‘Pathways’ is used to describe the different study and training opportunities individuals
take up in pursuit of particular career and employment
aspirations. In Australia, a student’s post
-
school options include University study, full
-
time TAFE study, Australian Apprenticeships (now
incorporating traineeships) and employment. Other possibilities include short courses, part
-
time
university or TAFE
study and distance education. The program you select in your final years of
secondary education is the first step toward creating a pathway that will lead you to future career
and employment opportunities.


At Mount St Joseph Girls’ College there are thre
e types of courses offered to students. Students
need to choose one of the following courses:



Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE)


VCE / Vocational Education and Training (VET)


VCAL (Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning)


The initial choice between VCAL and VCE is a crucial one and one that many students do not think
through, often regretting
their choice well into Year 11
or Year 12. Here are the options at Mount St
Joseph Girls’ College.



























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Pathway One
-

VCE


Overview

During your last two years at MSJ you usually study a minimum of 22 units. You may have
completed one
unit

during Year 10.



Of the 22 units at MSJ, you must select:


1.

At

least 4 sequential units from the group of English Studies



English 1 and 2, English

3 and 4, English Language 1 and 2, English Language 3 and 4, Literature
1
and
2, Literature 3 and 4

2.

A
t least 2 units of Religion

or

3.

R
eligion

and
S
ociety in Art (1 unit).


Year One:

In your first year of VCE at MSJ you would usually choose
12

or 13

units

to study in the two
semesters. This must include Religio
us Education
.


Year Two:

In your second year you would usually
choose 10 units

to study in the two semesters. These units
must include at least five sequences of Units 3
and

4, including at least
one sequence from the
group of English Studies


English 3 and 4, Literature 3 and 4, English Language 3 and 4.


Satisfactory

complet
ion:

To complete requirements of the VCE you must satisfactorily complete a total of no fewer than
16
units.

Satisfactoril
y completed units must include:


1.

A
t least 3 units from the group of English
studies, which must include a 3 and
4 sequence
of

English, English Language or Literature.

AND

2.

A
t least three other sequence
s of Units 3
and

4 studies other
than your English study


you may
take more than one of the Unit 3
and

4 English studies.

3.

The expectation of the College is that students undertake a minimum of five Unit 3
and

4
sequences at Year 12 level.


Further study:

Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre (VTAC) advises that for the calculation of a student’s
Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR), satisfactory completion of both Units 3
and

4 of an
English study is also required.








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VCE/VET/VCAL Course Selection

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Assessment
:

The Victorian Cer
tificate of Education (VCE) is a
two
year

certificate
,

and assessment is spread over
Years 11 and 12. Different methods of assessing students and their attainment of specified learning
outcomes will give students the opportunity to develop and demonstrate a range of skills. The
award of satisfactory complet
ion for a unit is based on a decision that the student has
demonstrated achievement of the set of learning outcomes specified for the unit. This decision will
be based on the teacher’s assessment of the student’s overall performance on assessment tasks
de
signated for the unit.


Units 1 and 2
:

The award of ‘Satisfactory Completion’ for a unit is based on a decision that the student has
demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit in the Study Design.
The
College determines procedu
res for the assessment of levels of achievement. This

is
in accordance
with the College’s VCE Satisfactory Completion Policy. Assessment of a student’s level of
achievement is by a combination of coursework, extended tasks and examinations.


Units 3 and 4
:

The award of ‘Satisfactory Completion’ for a unit is based on a decision that the student has
demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for the unit in the Study Design. A
student’s level of achievement will be determined by a combinatio
n of school assessed coursework,
tasks and external examinations.


Rep
orting
:

Completion of a Unit will be reported on the Statement of Results issued by the Victorian
Curriculum Assessment Authority (VCAA) as S (Satisfactory), or N (Not Satisfactory).
The College
will also provide written reports on the level of achievement attained by students at the end of
Units 1, 2 and 3.



















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Pathway Two


VET/VCE


What is VET?

VET stands for vocational education and training. VET is a national system designed to skill people
to work in particular industries e.g. plumbing, retail,
childcare
, hospitality etc.


VET in Schools

VET in the VCE or VCAL allows students to include vocati
onal studies within their senior secondary
certificate. Students undertake nationally recognised training from either accredited state
curriculum in schools or national training packages in TAFE
Colleges, which may contribute,

to their
VCE and/or VCAL.


VCE VET Programs with a Study Score

For some VET subjects the study score can
contribute directly to the ATAR

as one of the
student’s

primary four scaled studies or as the fifth or sixth study.

It is important to note that the Units 3 and
4 sequences of V
CE VET programs are not designed as stand
-
alone studies. In order to receive the
VET qualification, students must undertake the entire Units 1 to 4 structure of a VCE VET program.


Vocational Education and Training at MSJ

The College recognises that the VC
E alone does not meet the need
s of all students and
therefore
we offer alternative

pathways. Students at Mount St

Joseph Girls’ College have the opportunity to
begin the following TAFE Certificates, otherwise known as Vocational Education and Training
programs (VET).

The certificates listed below are vocational programs and give students practical
work skills, which

are accepted and accredited by industry.


VET Programs

Mount St

Joseph offers some VET units at year 10. These units commence at this level so that a
good choice of subjects is still possible in Year 11.


The certificate courses are:


1.

Certificate III in
Media

2.

Certificate II in Music

3.

Certificate II in Information Technology (with modules in Cert II)


These courses could change depending on student numbers. We have the facilities and qualified
staff to conduct these programs. Students will finish their thr
ee year programs with
both

a VCE and
a TAFE certificate.


TAFE Credit Transfer

Many VCE units may provide credit upon entry into a TAFE course


in other words you may not
have to attempt some of the modules in the TAFE course because your VCE work is
considered to
be equivalent. This means that the TAFE course may be completed in a shorter time tha
n

would
otherwise be the case.


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VCE/VET/VCAL Course Selection

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Pathway Three


VCAL


VCAL Design

The Victorian Certificate
of Applied Learning at Mount St

Joseph Girls’ College is offered and
accredited to the senior level. The course is full time. The timetable is structured to enable VCAL
students to satisfy the Industry Specific strand through their VET training and related employment
off campus on Wed
nesdays and Thursdays.


Students undertake VET training through a TAFE or Registered Training Organisation for School
Based Apprenticeships and Traineeships.


What is the VCAL?

The Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL) is a hands
-
on option for Y
ears 11 and 12
students.


The VCAL gives you practical work
-
related experience, as well as literacy and numeracy skills and
the development of personal skills that are important for life and work. Like the Victorian
Certificate of Education (VCE), VCAL is

an accredited secondary certificate, which is managed and
overseen by the Victorian Curriculum Assessment Authority (VCAA). Pathways open to students
who do VCAL are at Technical and Further Education (TAFE) institutes, traineeships and
employment.


The

VCAL’s flexibility enables you to undertake a study program that suits your interests and
learning needs. Accredited modules and units are selected for the following four compulsory
strands:


1.

Literacy and Numeracy Skills

2.

Industry Specific Skills

3.

Work Rel
ated Skills

4.

Personal Development Skills.


If you successfully complete your VCAL, you will receive a Certificate and a Statement of Results
from VCAA.


What I Need to Know:


Why would I choose to do the VCAL?

Just like the VCE, the VCAL is an accredited se
nior secondary school certificate undertaken in Years
11 and 12. The VCAL is based on hands
-
on learning, also re
ferred to as ‘applied learning

.

If you
choose to do the VCAL, you will gain practical experience and employability skills, as well as the
ski
lls you will need to go onto further training in the workplace or at a TAFE institute.








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VCE/VET/VCAL Course Selection

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When can I do the VCAL?

You can begin your VCAL program in Year 11 or Year 12 of secondary school. The VCAL is also
available at TAFE institutes and a number of
Adult and Community Education (ACE) centres.


How long will VCAL take me to complete?

The VCAL has been developed for Years 11 and 12 students and the time it takes varies depending
on how your VCAL program is structured. A VCAL Intermediate and Senior ce
rtificate will usually
take a year each to complete.


What do I get after successfully completing VCAL?

If you successfully complete your VCAL program you will receive a VCAL certificate at Intermediate
and Senior levels, depending on the VCAL level you ch
oose to complete. You will also receive a
Statement of Results from the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA), listing all
completed VCAL, VCE and Vocational Education and Training (VET) units, as well as a Statement of
Attainment from the
Registered Training Organisation (RTO) for VET or Further Education (FE)
training you have completed.


What Do I Study?

With the help of your teacher or careers counsellor, you can develop a VCAL program that suits
your particular learning needs and intere
sts. You have the choice of selecting units and modules
from each of the following four VCAL strands.


Strand 1


Literacy and Numeracy Skills

Your VCAL program must include literacy and numeracy subjects.


Strand 2


Industry Specific Skills

Your VCAL
program must include industry specific units from VET certificates. You may have the
opportunity to undertake various modules or units of competence from a range of VET certificates
to meet the VCAL requirements, and gain experience in a range of vocation
al areas. The range of
VET options is extensive and includes for example, automotive, engineering, building and
construction, hospitality, retail, multimedia, information technology, agriculture, horticulture,
warehousing and hair and beauty. These skills

may also be developed through a school based
apprenticeship.


Strand 3


Work Related Skills

In order to develop employability skills, VCAL gives you the choice of undertaking a structured
workplace learning placement or a School Based Apprenticeship or T
raineeship and/or part
-
time
work. You will also study units and modules that will help prepare you for work, for example
occupational health and safety and job interview skills.


Strand 4


Personal Development Skills

As part of your VCAL program you will

participate in community
-
based projects and/or structured
activities that will help develop your teamwork skills, self
-
confidence and other skills important for
life and work.




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What must I do to be awarded a VCAL Certificate?

To be awarded a VCAL certificate, you must successfully complete a learning program of 1000
nominal hours that is designed to comply with the following credit requirements.

The learning
program must:


1.

Be

made up of a minimum of ten credits

2.

Include

curriculum components to fulfil each of the four VCAL curriculum strands

3.

Include:



A

minimum of two VCAL units

A

minimum of one credit for Literacy and one credit for Numera
cy; and

i
n

each of the
remaining three strands, components to the value of at least one credit.

4.

Include

components to the value of six credits at the level of the VCAL award or above, of
which one must be for Literacy and one credit must be
for a
Personal
Development Skills
unit.


Will the VCAL get me ready to enter a trade?

Once you have completed your VCAL, you will have knowledge and skills that are a useful
preparation for a trade or industry certificate. The knowledge and skills you have learnt in
VCAL
may also count towards a traineeship or apprenticeship. Many students include a School Based
Apprenticeship or Traineeship as part of their VCAL.



Assessment

A range of assessment methods will be used for VCAL units to enable students to demonstrate

successful completion of the learning outcomes within this curriculum. Assessment will be based on
authentic situations linked to the project or activity the student is undertaking.


Assessment will also be designed so that students are able to demonstrat
e that they can apply and
integrate the knowledge and skills developed in the Learning Program.


Units in the Personal Development and Work Related Skills Strands will have learning outcomes and
criteria designed to cover such application and integration,
using approaches such as portfolios,
projects and assignments.


Certification

The Victorian Curriculum Assessment Authority will award the Victorian Certificate of Applied
Learning to students who have successfully completed the VCAL course requirements at

the
appropriate level.


The student will receive:




A VCAL Certificate



A Statement of Results


TAFES and other the Registered Training Organisations for successful completion of VET or Further
Education curriculum will provide additional Statements of
Attainment or certificates
. Students
who begin the VCAL Learning Program but do not complete it will still receive a Statement of
Results at the completion of each year of study.




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Australian School Based Apprenticeships (ASBA)

The Australian School Based

Apprenticeships (ASBA) for Secondary School Students Program
involves the student undertaking their VCE and normally a VCAL program as well as being employed
and trained. This program can be undertaken in a variety of work placements eg: office
administr
ation, sport and recreation, hospitality, community services and retail.


Students are employed 1 day per week and must complete the required allocated work modules
related to their individual programs. Australian School Based Apprenticeships generally pr
ovide the
same contribution to the VCE
as their related VET in the VCE
Program.


Our College is committed to promoting and developing multiple pathways and transition
opportunities for our students and therefore provide the opportunity for the students wit
h
specific
pathway needs to undertake a VET program through a variety of Registered Training Organisations.
Some of the certificates being undertaken this year are outlined below:


Certificate III in Business Studies

Certificate II in Business Studies

Certificate III in Community Services 1

Certificate III in Events Management

Certificate III in Hospitality

Certificate II in Hospitality

Certificate II in Animal Studies

Certificate III in
Allied Health

Certificate III in Tourism

Certificate III in Childr
en’s Services

Certificate III in Hairdressing

Certificate III in Make Up Services


In
2014

the College will also offer the following Certificates to both VCE and VCAL student at the
College:


The certificate courses are:



V
ET
Certificate III Music



VET

Certificate III Interactive Digital Media













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15



Pathways One & Two


Planning your VCE
/VET

Course


When planning your course you need to consider the following:


1.

What you are good at, the tasks you do well and excel at

2.

The tasks and activities you
enjoy doing

3.

The pre
-
requisites needed for the career path you are considering

4.

Consider units that complement each other, eg
: Physics and Mathematics; Food
Technology
and

Hospitality.


Spend some time reading about the units, talk to staff and students who
are involved in the area,
and ask lots of questions about the units at the
Cours
e

Selection Assembly and Senior Subject
Information Night.


Units 3
and

4 at Year 11

Students
may

apply to study a Unit 3
and

4 s
tudy

in Year 11 except for those listed here. F
or these
subjects it is compulsory that students study Units 1
and

2 first: French, Italian, Japanese,
Mathematical Methods, Chemistry, and Physics. Specialist Mathematics can only be taken in Year
12.


Note:

Students must complete
an applicatio
n form for the study of a
Unit 3 and 4 in Year 11
.

All
applications will be considered on a case
-
by
-
case basis by a panel including the Director of Learning
and Teaching, the Deputy Principal



Learning and Teaching
,
Domain Leaders,
Subject Teachers and
t
he relevant Year Level Coordinator. The panel will consider each application and then make

a
decision on whether or

not it will be approved. The decision of the panel is final and binding.


All completed Unit 3 and 4 applications must be submitted
by
Aug
ust
20
, 2013.












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Undertaking Accelerated Studies in Year 11


Acceleration in the VCE


Acceleration in the VCE refers to students undertaking a VCE study a year earlier than normal. This
acceleration is for students who have demonstrated ability and

commitment to their studies in
Years 7 to 10. This pathway is not automatic and students need to apply to undertake acceleration
and have their application approved by the college.


Students wishing to apply to undertake a Unit
s

3 and 4 study in Year 11

m
ust carefully consider
their current and past academic strengths and weaknesses. They need to research and investigate
the most appropriate study that could best complement their learning strengths, whilst being
aware of the recommended subject background
for successfully undertaking their nominated
study. It is expected that students considering applying for accelerated studies will have fully
investigated the study through reading the description in the Handbook.


Undertaking a VCE study early requires co
mmitment not only to this study but also all studies
undertaken. Students in Year 11 who are undertaking a Unit 3 and 4 sequence must ensure that
their Unit 1 and 2 studies are not neglected. These foundation studies are essential for a successful
Year 12.

Such a decision should not be taken lightly. It is important to note that successful
completion of a Unit 3 and 4 sequence in Year 11 is not acceptable grounds for a student to request
fewer studies in Year 12.


The following Accelerated Studies are avail
able to Year 11 VCE students in
2014
:


Accelerated Studies available to Year 11 students



Biology Units 3 and 4



Business Management Units 3 and 4



Design and Technology


Textiles
Units 3 and 4



Food and Technology Units 3 and 4



Further
Mathematics
Units 3
and 4



Health and Human Development Units 3 and 4



History: Australian Units 3 and 4



IT Applications Units 3 and 4



Legal Studies Units 3 and 4



Physical Education Units 3 and 4



Psychology Units 3 and 4



Religion and society Units 3 and 4



Texts and Traditio
ns Units 3 and 4



Literature Units 3 and 4





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17



The Selection Criteria:

The following criteria will be used to assess an application for an Accelerated Study:



Consistently high level of commitment and persistent effort
across a range of subject areas (
B+
grades or higher in all assessment tasks
).




Demonstrated ability to write clear, coherent, well structured responses.



Demonstrated ability to analyse and synthesise information.



Demonstrated ability to work in a mature and cooperative manner.



Able to co
pe with the demands of the accelerated study.



Demonstrated ability to work independently, complete work reliably and submit punctually.



Demonstrated ability to evaluate own learning and willingness to seek teacher assistance when
appropriate.



No intende
d period of extended absence for family travel, which could impact on the 90%
attendance requirement required for satisfactory completion.



A well considered two year VCE program in view of future tertiary and career expectations.


The Application for an A
ccelerated Study:

An application for an accelerated study must be completed by the student. Students will also be
required to attach c
opies of their Semester One 2013

report.


The Application Process



The student completes the ‘Application for Acceleration

in the VCE’.



The application is submitted with the Course Selection Forms.



Applications are considered by the relevant Learning Domain Leader. Subject teachers will
provide advice to the Domain Leader on request. Other information, such

as NAPLAN data and

Career wise

data, will be reviewed in this process.




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18



VCE Studies Available


VCE 1 & 2 STUDIES


Accounting

Japanese

Biology

Legal Studies

Business Management

Literature

Chemistry

Mathematical Methods

Design and Technology


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M敤楡

M牡浡

M敤楡 V䕔

䕮杬楳g

Mu獩V VE吠

䕮杬楳栠䱡n杵慧e

偨祳楣慬a䕤uc慴楯n

䕮杬楳栠慳 愠S散潮T 䱡Lgu慧a

偨祳楣猠

潲 M楡i散e

偳祣U潬o杹

䕮癩牯vm敮W慬a卣楥nce

剥汩杩潮 anT 卯c楥i礠

䙯潤 F 呥cUn潬o杹

剥汩杩潮 ☠WUe 䅲WV

䙯unT慴i潮 MaWU敭eW楣V

却uT楯i䅲W
V


䙲FncU

呥xW猠☠F牡riW楯iV

䝥G敲慬 MaWU敭慴楣猠

VC䅌A䱩L敲慣a

䝥G敲慬 MaWU猠AT癡vceT

VC䅌ANum敲慣a

H敡汴U F Hu浡m M敶敬ep浥湴m

VC䅌A健牳rn慬aM敶敬epm敮W

H楳i潲礠



th

Century

VCAL Work Place

Information Technology

Visual Communication & Design

Information Technology VET


Italian



VCE 3 & 4 STUDIES


Accounting

Legal Studies

Biology

Literature

Business Management

Mathematical Methods

Chemistry

Media

Design and Technology


呥xW楬敳

M敤楡 V䕔

M牡浡

Mu獩V VE吠

䕮杬楳栠

偨祳楣慬a
䕤uc慴楯n

䕮杬楳栠䱡n杵慧e

偨祳楣猠

䕮杬楳栠慳 愠S散潮T 䱡Lgu慧a

偳祣U潬o杹

潲 M楡i散e

剥汩杩潮 anT 卯c楥iy

䙯潤 F 呥cUn潬o杹

却uT楯i䅲W
V

䙲FncU

印散楡汩獴 MaWU敭eW楣V

䙵牴U敲 M慴U敭eW楣V

呥xW猠☠F牡riW楯iV

䝬潢慬a偯汩l楣V

VC䅌A䱩L敲慣a

H敡汴U F
Hu浡m M敶敬ep浥湴

VC䅌ANum敲慣a

H楳i潲礠䅵VW牡汩rn

VC䅌A健牳rn慬aM敶敬epm敮W

H楳i潲礠剥癯汵W楯iV

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䥮f潲浡W楯n T散en潬潧礠

V楳i慬aC潭mun楣aW楯渠i M敳楧e

䥮W敲n慴楯n慬a偯汩W楣猠


䥴慬楡a


䩡J慮敳e



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19




Religious Education




Religion and Society



Texts and Traditions



Religion and the Arts


The
VCE Religious Education program is the culmination of 12 years of Catholic Education for all
those who have attended Catholic Primary and Secondary Schooling. It is an important time in

which students now have the opportunity to explore in depth what it is they understand about
their Catholic Tradition. This entry into the VCE study allows the student an opportunity to uncover
new perspectives and understandings of the Christian traditio
n as well as their own faith.


This study, in conjunction with
a
Reflection Day at Yea
r 11,
a
Social Justice Day,
a
Wellb
eing Day and
a three
day Retreat at Year 12, provides the students with an opportunity to draw together the
many parts that form the bi
gger picture. It helps them to prepare for the next stage of their lives
where they will embark upon their journey of faith outside the relative comfort of the Catholic
School.


The VCE Religious Education Program allows students to choose which Religious
Education units
they study. This program allows flexibility of choice and provides students with the opportunity to
choose units that they enjoy and are better suite
d to. Every student at Mount St

Joseph will study
Religious Education in Year
11

and 12
;

ho
wever, it is not mandatory to choose a Unit 3
and
4
combination

in year 12.


The options available to Year 11 students in
2014

are:




Religion and Society Units
1

&
2



Texts and Traditions Units
1

&
2



Relig
ion & Society Units 3 & 4



Texts & Traditions
Units 3

& 4



Religion and
the Arts
Unit 1


studied through Semester 1 and 2


Students are encouraged to select the option that they have either enjoyed and/or obtained good
results for in Year 10. While it is not compulsory for students to complete a Unit 3
and

4

combinations
, there are advantages to doing so.


Students who have achieved very high results in Religious Education in Years 7
-
10 and have a strong
interest in this area are encouraged to choose
from Units 1
-

4
. Those
students,

who feel that they
are n
ot suited to a demanding academic study, involving a lot of reading, writing and responding,
are encouraged to select
Religion and the Art
s
. Any student who is unsure of which option would
best suit them is advised to discuss their choices with a member of

the Religious Education Learning
Team.









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20




Religion & Society


Description

In this unit students explore the origins of religion, identifying the nature and purpose of religion
past and present. They investigate the contribution of religion to the
development of human
society and then focus on the role of religious traditions in shaping personal and group identity.
Students examine how religious traditions are affected and changed by individuals and groups. The
unit provides the opportunity for stud
ents to understand the often complex relationships that exist
between individuals, groups, religious traditions and the society in which they live.


Unit
1
:

Religion & Soc
iety

Throughout this unit at least two religious traditions should be studied. Differ
ent religious traditions
may be selected for each area of study. Religious traditions to be studied are to be chosen from
more than one of the following groups:




Religions of ancient civilisations

(for example, Mesopotamian, Babylonian, Egyptian, Canaanite,




Roman, Greek)



Primal religions (for example, Australian Aboriginal religions, religions of the Pacific islands)



Asian religions (for example, Buddhism, Hinduism, Chinese religions)



Abrahamic

religions (for example, Judaism, Christianity and Islam).


Unit 2: Ethics and

M
orality

In this unit students survey various approaches to ethical decision
-
making and then explore at least
two religious traditions in detail. They explore contemporary
ethical issues in the light of their
investigations into ethical decision
-
making and ethical perspectives, and moral viewpoints in
religious traditions.


Unit 3: The Search of Meaning

In this unit students begin by studying the religious beliefs developed
by one or more than one
religious tradition in response to the big questions of life. They explore the ways in which these
religious beliefs create meaning for religious traditions and their members. The religious beliefs of
any religion arise from the bel
iefs held about ultimate reality, and these in turn inform particular
beliefs about human existence; about its meaning, purpose and destiny.


Religious tradition/s will be chosen from one or more of the following groups:



Primal religions (for example, Aus
tralian Aboriginal religions, religions of the Pacific Islands)



Asian religions (for example, Buddhism, Hinduism, Chinese religions)



Abrahamic religions (for example, Judaism, Christianity and Islam).


Unit 4: Challenge and Response

In this unit students

explore challenge and response in historical and contemporary contexts.
Students investigate historical challenges to religious traditions arising internally and externally.
They explore the challenge to religious traditions in contemporary pluralistic so
ciety for action on
behalf of social justice and for assessment of new problems arising from social and technological
change.






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21



Assessment:

Units 3 and 4

Percentage contributions to the study score in VCE
Religion and Society

for Units 3 and 4

are as
follows:

Unit 3 School
-
assessed Coursework:


25
%

Unit 4 School
-
assessed Coursework:


25%

End
-
of
-
year examination:




50%


Texts & Traditions


Description

The study of VCE Texts and Traditions equips students to come to a deeper understanding of the
relationship between religious traditions and the written
texts, which

grow from and shape the
traditions. There is much to be learned about religious traditions if they are examined in relation to
the texts upon which they are founded. These texts become a touchstone to the tradition as the
tradition develops and responds t
o changing circumstances.


Units 1:
Texts
in
Tra
ditions


This unit examines the place of texts and their literary forms within a religious tradition. Story
-
telling is one of the major literary forms in religious traditions; other forms include law, prophec
y,
sacred songs, reflection and instruction. This unit explores the importance of texts at the source of
a tradition and how we might find and describe their meaning for the earlier and continuing
tradition. The discovery of meaning in a religious text is
known as exegesis. This unit introduces the
student to basic methods of exegesis to bring about a deeper awareness of the meaning of texts to
the religious tradition. This unit also explores how texts have been used by people both within and
beyond the rel
igious tradition as a means of bringing meaning to the text, or using the text to bring
meaning to issues or ideas in a new cultural setting.


Units 2: Texts in Society

In this unit texts are studied as a means of investigating themes such as justice,
racism and gender
roles. Therefore, the texts selected for study should be potential sources of ideas about these or
other themes in society. Some of the texts may call for change in attitudes and values; others may
call for changes in social, religious an
d political institutions. Some texts may justify or support
existing social, religious and political institutions.


Unit
3:
Texts
a
nd The Early Tradition

The texts of a particular religious tradition can be seen to be foundational in that they recount
specific events, narratives, laws and teachings that describe the beginnings and initial development
of a religious tradition’s history. In this unit, students explore the history and culture from which
the tradition being studied was formed. They gain an
understanding that the historical milieu of
these beginnings lent shape and content to the texts themselves.









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Unit 4: Texts and their teachings

In this unit students continue to apply, in greater depth, the exegetical method to the passages for
special study begun in Unit 3. Some texts are regarded as essential for the continuation of a
tradition because they function as a means of communicating teachings or understandings about
the relationship between the human and the transcendent. These under
standings are often
expressed through religious ideas, beliefs or social themes in the particular texts.


With the passing of time, some of the themes contained in the foundational texts have been
reinterpreted at different times in the tradition. In this
unit a significant idea, belief or social theme
contained in the set text will be studied, and the interpretation of the text in the light of the idea,
belief or theme considered.


Assessment:

Units 3 and 4

Percentage contributions to the study score in VCE
Text and Traditions
for Units 3 and 4
a
re as
follows:

Unit 3 School
-
assessed Coursework:


25
%

Unit 4 School
-
assessed Coursework:


25%

End
-
of
-
year examination:




50%



Religion and Society through
the Arts

-

Unit

1


Description

This unit focuses on the role of religious traditions in shaping personal growth and group identity.
It uses art as a practical medium for students to explore what is sacred. The Unit provides the
opportunity for students
to understand the relationships that exist between individuals and groups
within religious traditions as well as the relationship between religious traditions and the society in
which they live.




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23



Language




English



English Language



E
ALD

-

English as
a
n Ad
ditional

Language
or Dialect



Literature


The English Requirement


Taking an English study is compulsory and students must satisfactorily complete (pass) a minimum
3 units of study from the core group of English studies (see table below). Two of these studies must
be Units 3
and

4 level.


Choosing your English Study


You have a
number of

options:


You can study English in Year 11 and English in Year 12

Or

English Language in Year 11 and English Language in Year 12

Or

English Language in Year 11 and English in Year 12

Or

Literature in Year 11 and either Literature or En
glish or English Language in Year 12


NB: Unit 3 & 4 subjects must be taken as a seque
nce. No more than two of the 3 and
4 sequences
will count towards a student’s ATAR


Year 11



Englis
h
/EALD

Language

Literature

and/or

and/or

Englis
h
/EALD

Literature

and/or

and/or

Year 12

Language

Please note


祯y c慮 To
two

of these combinations but not all three.


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24



English/English as a
n Additional

Language

or Dialect (EALD)


Description

The English language is central to the way
in which students understand, critique and appreciate
their world, and to the ways in which they participate socially, economically and culturally in
Australian society.

The study of English encourages the development of literate individuals capable of cri
tical and
imaginative thinking, aesthetic appreciation and creativity. The mastery of the key knowledge and
skills described in this study design underpins effective functioning in the contexts of study and
work as well as productive participation in a dem
ocratic society in the twenty
-
first century.


Unit 1

The focus of this unit is on the reading of a range of texts, particularly narrative and persuasive
texts, in order to comprehend, appreciate and analyse the ways in which texts are constructed and
interpreted. Students will develop competence and confidence in creating written, oral and
multimodal texts. The term ‘set text’ refers to texts chosen by the school for the achievement of
Outcomes 1 and 2.


Unit 2

The focus of this unit is on reading and
responding to an expanded range of text types and genres in
order to analyse ways in which they are constructed and interpreted, and on the development of
competence and confidence in creating written, oral or multimodal texts. The term ‘set text’ refers
t
o texts chosen by the school for the achievement of Outcomes 1 and 2.


Unit 3

The focus of this unit is on reading and responding both orally and in writing to a range of texts.

Students analyse how the authors of texts create meaning and the different way
s in which texts can
be interpreted. They develop competence in creating written texts by exploring ideas suggested by
their reading within the chosen Context, and the ability to explain choices they have made as
authors.


Unit 4

The focus of this unit is

on reading and responding in writing to a range of texts in order to analyse
their construction and provide an interpretation. Students create written or multimodal texts
suggested by their reading within the chosen Context and explain creative choices th
ey have made
as authors in relation to form, purpose, language, audience and context.


Assessment
:

Units 3 and 4

Percentage contributions to the study score in VCE English
for Units 3 and 4

are as follows:

Unit 3 School
-
assessed Coursework:


25
%

Unit 4 School
-
assessed Coursework:


25
%

End
-
of
-
year examination:




50
%




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25



English Language


Description

Language is central to human life. Learning about language helps us to understand ourselves and
the world in which we live. Language is the
cornerstone of social cohesion.

This study aims to combine learning about the nature of language in human thought and
communication with learning how to use English more effectively and creatively. It is informed by
the discipline of linguistics and integr
ates a systematic exploration of the nature of the English
Language.


Unit
1:
Language
a
nd Communication

The focus of this unit is language and its use in communication. The use of language is an essential
aspect of human behaviour, the means by which ind
ividuals relate to the world, to each other, and
to the community of which they are members. This unit focuses on the nature and functions of
language itself and the way language is organised so that it provides its users with the means by
which they can m
ake sense of their experience and have contact with others.


Unit
2:
Language
Change

The focus of this unit is language change. Languages are dynamic and change is an inevitable and a
continual process. Engaging with texts from the past can show us how all subsystems of the
language system are affected


phonetics and phonology, morphology

and lexicology, syntax,
discourse analysis, and semantics, and how English has altered over the centuries and how it
continues to evolve today.

This unit explores the concepts of change, especially within Australian English, and aims to give
students ins
ight into the what, how and why of these changes.

Unit
3:
Language
Variation a
nd Social Purpose

In this unit students investigate English language in the Australian social setting, along a continuum
of informal and formal registers. They consider language

as a means of societal interaction,
understanding that through written and spoken texts we communicate information, ideas,
attitudes, prejudices and ideological stances. Students examine the stylistic features of formal and
informal language in both spok
en and written modes: the grammatical and discourse structure of
language; the choice and meanings of words within texts; how words are combined to convey a
message; the purpose in conveying a message; and the particular context i
n which a message is
conve
yed.




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26



Unit
4:
Language
Variation a
nd Identity

In this unit students focus on the role of language in establishing and challenging different
identities. Many varieties of English exist in contemporary Australian society, including national,
regional, cult
ural and social variations. Standard Australian English is the variety that is granted
prestige in contemporary Australian society and it has a role in establishing national identity.
However, non
-
Standard varieties also play a role in constructing users’
social and cultural identities.
Students examine both print and digital texts to consider the ways different identities are
constructed. Such historical and contemporary texts include, but should not be limited to, extracts
from novels, films or television

programs, poetry, letters and emails, transcripts of spoken
interaction, songs, advertisements, speeches and bureaucratic or official documents.



Assessment:

Units 3 and 4

Percentage contributions to the study score in VCE English Language
for Units 3
and 4

are as
follows:

Unit 3 School
-
assessed Coursework:


25
%

Unit 4 School
-
assessed Coursework:


25
%

End
-
o
f
-
year examination
:



50
%




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27



Literature


Description

The study of literature focuses on the enjoyment and appreciation of reading that arises from

discussion, debate and the challenge of exploring the meanings of literary texts. Students reflect on
their interpretations and those of others.

The study is based on the premise that meaning is derived
from the relationship between the text, the context
in which it was produced and the experience of
life and literature the reader brings to the texts. Accordingly, the study encompasses texts that vary
in form and range from past to contemporary social and cultural contexts. Students learn to
understand tha
t texts are constructions, to consider the complexity of language and to recognise
the influence of contexts and form. The study of literature encourages independent and critical
thinking in students’ analytical
and creative responses to texts.



Unit 1

Th
is unit focuses on the ways literary texts represent human experience and the reading practices
students develop to deepen their understanding of a text. Students respond to a range of texts
personally, critically and creatively. This variety of approaches

to reading invites questions about
the ideas and concerns of the text. While the emphasis is on students’ close engagement with
language to explore texts, students also inform their understanding with knowledge of the
conventions associated with different

forms of text, for example poetry, prose, drama and/or non
-
print texts.


Unit 2

The focus of this unit is on students’ critical and creative responses to texts. Students deepen their
understanding of their responses to aspects of texts such as the style o
f narrative, the characters,
the language and structure of the text. Students extend their exploration of the ideas and concerns
of the text. They understand the ways their own culture and the cultures represented in the text
can influence their interpreta
tions and shape different meanings. Students make comparisons
between texts and identify some of the relationships that exist through features such as the
language, characterisation and ideas.


Unit 3

This unit focuses on the ways writers construct their w
ork and how meaning is created for and by
the reader. Students consider how the form of text (such as poetry, prose, drama, non
-
print or
combinations of these) affects meaning and generates different expectations in readers, the ways
texts represent views
and values and comment on human experience, and the social, historical and
cultural contexts of literary works.


Unit 4

This unit focuses on students’ creative and critical responses to texts. Students consider the context
of their responses to texts as we
ll as the concerns, the style of the language and the point of view in
their re
-
created or adapted work.

In their responses, students develop an interpretation of a text and learn to synthesise the insights
gained by their engagement with various aspects o
f a text into a cogent, substantiated response.


Assessment

Units 3 and 4

Percentage contributions to the study score in VCE Literature
for Units 3 and 4

are as follows:

Unit 3 School
-
assessed Coursework:


25
%

Unit 4 School
-
assessed Coursework:


25
%

End
-
of
-
year examination:



50
%


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28



LOTE


French, Italian & Japanese



Units
1
-

4:
Common Areas
o
f Study

The areas of study for LOTE comprise themes and topics, grammar, text types, vocabulary and kinds
of writing. They are common to all four units of the
study, and they are designed to be drawn upon
in an integrated way, as appropriate to the linguistic needs of the student, and the outcomes for
the unit.


The themes and topics are the vehicle through which the student will demonstrate achievement of
the o
utcomes, in the sense that they form the subject of the activities and tasks that the student
undertakes.


The grammar, vocabulary, text types and kinds of writing are linked, both to each other, and to the
themes and topics. Together, as common areas of s
tudy, they add a further layer of definition to
the knowledge and skills required for successful achievement of outcomes.

Themes and Topics

There are three prescribed themes with a number of prescribed topics.


French



The individual (Personal World;
Education and aspirations; Personal opinions and values)



The French
-
speaking communities (Lifestyles, Historical perspectives, Arts and entertainment)



The changing world (Social issues; The world of work; Scientific and technological issues)


Italian



The i
ndividual (Personal World; Health and Leisure; Education and aspirations)



The Italian
-
speaking communities (Historical perspectives; Lifestyle in Italy and abroad; Arts
and entertainment; Social and contemporary issues)



The changing world (The world of wor
k; Technology; Trade and commerce; Tourism and
hospitality)


Japanese



The Japanese
-
speaking communities (Visiting Japan; Life in Japan; Getting to know people in
Japan)



The changing world (The world of work; Changes in daily life; Home and neighbourhood)



The individual (Personal World; Daily life; Past and future)


Unit 1

On completion of this unit, a student should be able to:

1.

Establish and maintain a spoken or written exchange related to personal areas of experience.

2.

Listen to, read and obtain informatio
n from written and spoken texts.

3.

Produce a personal response to a text focusing on real or imaginary experience.


Unit 2

On completion of this unit, a student should be able to:

1.

Participate in a spoken or written exchange related to making arrangements and

completing
transactions.

2.

Listen to, read and extract and use information and ideas from spoken and written texts.

3.

Give expression to real or imaginary experience in written or spoken form.




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Unit 3

On completion of this unit, a student should be able to:

1.

Express ideas through the production of original texts.

2.

Analyse and use information from spoken texts.

3.

Exchange information, opinions and experiences.


Unit 4

On co
mpletion of this unit, a student should be able to:

1.

Analyse and use information from written

texts.

2.

Respond critically to spoken and written
texts, which

reflect aspects of the language and culture
of the LOTE
-
speaking communities.


Detailed Study

The student is required to undertake a detailed study during Units 3 and 4. The student will be
expe
cted to discuss their detailed study
in section 2, Discussion,

of the Oral Examination. Over the
course of Units 3 and 4, approximately 15 hours of scheduled class time should be devoted to the
detailed study.


Assessment

Units 3 and 4

Percentage contributions to the study score in VCE
French, Italian and Japanes
e

for Units 3 and 4

are as follows:

Unit 3 school
-
assessed coursework:

25%

Unit 4 school
-
a
ssessed coursework:

25%

Exa
minations*:

oral component

12.5%



written component

37.5%


*A single grade is awarded




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Health & Physical Education




Health and Human Development



Physical Education


Health and Human Development


Description

Through the study of VCE Health and Human Development, students investigate health and human
development
in local, Australian and global communities. Health is a dynamic condition that is
influenced by complex interrelationships between individuals and biomedical and behavioural
factors, as well as physical and social environments. These interrelationships ar
e reflected in a
social view of health that sees health as being created in the settings where people live and work.
This social view of health recognises the need for personal skills development, the importance of
empowering communities to take action to
promote health, the creation of social and physical
environments that are supportive of health and development, an awareness of the impacts on
health of public policies and the need for health services to be oriented towards health promotion
and the preven
tion of ill health.


Unit
1:
The
Health
a
nd Development Of
Australia’s
Youth

This unit focuses on the health and individual human development of Australia’s youth. There are
many factors that influence health and individual human development of youth, including the
importance of nutrition for the provision of energy and growth as w
ell as food behaviours and their
impact on youth health and individual human development.


Unit
2:
Individual
Human Development
a
nd Health Issues

Individual human development is perceived as involving a series of orderly and predictable changes,
which can
be classified as physical, social, emotional and intellectual. Over the lifespan, individuals
accumulate life experiences that affect both their health and individual human development. This
unit focuses on the lifespan stages of childhood and adulthood.


There are many determinants of health and development of Australia’s children; however, social
environments such as the family and community are crucial, as children develop through their
relationships with others.


Unit
3:
Australia’s
Health

Australians
generally enjoy good health and are among the healthiest people in the world when
compared to other developed countries. The health status of Australians can be measured in many
ways, such as consideration of burden of disease, health adjusted life expecta
ncy, disability
adjusted life years (DALYs), life expectancy, under
-
five mortality rate, mortality and morbidity rates,
incidence and prevalence of disease. Despite Australia’s good health status, there is still potential
for improvements.





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Unit
4:
Globa
l
Health
a
nd Human Development

This unit takes a global perspective on achieving sustainable improvements in health and human
development. In the context of this unit human development is about creating an environment in
which people can develop to their
full potential and lead productive, creative lives in accord with
their needs and interests. It is about expanding people’s choices and enhancing capabilities (the
range of things people can be and do), having access to knowledge, health and a decent stand
ard of
living, and participating in the life of their community and decisions affecting their lives
.



Assessment:

Units 3 and 4

Percentage contributions to the study score in VCE HHD for Units 3 and 4 are as follows:

Unit 3 School Assessed Coursework:


25%

Unit 4 School Assessed Coursework:


25%

End of year examination:



50%



Physical Education


Description

VCE Physical Education examines the biological, physiological, psychological, social and cultural
influences on performance and participation in
physical activity. It focuses on the interrelationship
between motor learning and psychological, biomechanical, physiological and sociological factors
that influence physical performances, and participation in physical activity. The study of physical
activ
ity and sedentary behaviour is significant for the understanding of health, wellb
eing and
performance of people.


The study enables the integration of theoretical knowledge with practical application through
participation in physical activities. There are
opportunities for students to apply theoretical
concepts and reflect critically on factors that affect all levels of performance and participation.


Unit
1:
Bodies
i
n Motion

In this unit students explore how the body systems work together to produce move
ment and
analyse this motion using biomechanical principles. Through practical activities students explore the
relationships between the body systems and physical activity. They are introduced to the aerobic
and anaerobic pathways utilised to provide the m
uscles with the energy required for movement
and the basic characteristics of each pathway.


Unit
2:
Sports
Coaching
a
nd Physically Active Lifestyles

This unit explores a range of coaching practices and their contribution to effective coaching and
improved

performance of an athlete. The way in which a coach influences an athlete can have a
significant effect on performance. The approach a coach uses, the methods applied and the skills
used will have an impact on the degree of improvement experienced by an a
thlete. By studying
various approaches and applying this knowledge to a practical session, students gain a practical
insight into coaching.





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Unit
3:
Physical
Activity Participation
a
nd Physiological Performance

This unit introduces students to an understanding of physical activity and sedentary behaviour from
a participatory and physiological perspective. Students apply various methods to assess physical
activity and sedentary levels, and analyse the data in rela
tion to adherence to the National Physical
Activity Guidelines. Students study and apply the social
-
ecological model to identify a range of
Australian strategies that are effective in promoting participation in some form of regular activity.

Students inves
tigate the use of aerobic and quaerobic pathways to produce energy for movement.
Students also explore the
interplay of the three energy systems
.


Unit
4:
Enhancing
Performance

Improvements in performance, in particular fitness, depend on the ability of
the individual or coach
to gain, apply and evaluate knowledge and understanding of training. Students undertake an
activity analysis. Using the results of the analysis, they then investigate the required fitness
components and participate in a training pro
gram designed to improve or maintain selected
components. Athletes and coaches aim to continually improve and use nutritional, physiological
and psychological strategies to gain advantage over the competition. Students learn to critically
evaluate differen
t techniques and practices that can be used to enhance performance, and look at
the rationale for the banning or inclusion of various practices from sporting competition.


Assessment:

Units 3 and 4

Percentage contributions to the study score in VCE PE for
Units 3 and 4 are as follows:

Unit 3 School Assessed Coursework:


25%

Unit 4 School Assessed Coursework:


25%

End of year examination:




50%




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Humanities




Accounting



Business Management



History


20th Century



History


Australian



History


Revolutions



Global Politics



Legal Studies



Accounting

Description