Northwestern Consolidated Schools of Shelby County

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Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
1





Northwestern Consolidated Schools of Shelby County


Curriculum


8
th grade Science


Prepared by:


Greg Hill


2012










Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
2






Triton Central Middle School


Mission Statement


We are committed to providing and exiting, healthy, safe, and inspiring
learning
environment where staff, students, parents, and community
think creatively and utilize teamwork to maximize learning and
achievement
.













Triton Central Middle School

Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
3





8
th Grade S
cience


Narrative Description


Students in eighth grade study atoms,
elements, compounds and
molecules; and the relationship between atomic structure and chemical
properties. They study the water cycle and the role of the sun’s energy
in driving this process. Students investigate how genetic information is
transmitted from
parents to offspring. Students study the physical
properties of natural and engineered materials. Within this study
students employ the key principles of the nature of science and the
design process.










Course Concepts and Generalizations

Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
4





Nature of Science

Students gain scientific knowledge by observing the natural and constructed world, performing
and evaluating investigations and communicating their findings. These principles should guide
student work and be integrated into the curriculu
m along with the content standards on a daily
basis.

Matter



Physical Science
-

Describe how atomic structure determines chemical properties and how
atoms and molecules interact.

Science, Engineering, and Technology


Identify the appropriate materials t
o be used to solve a
problem based on their specific properties and characteristics.


Energy in the Earth System


Earth and Space Systems


Explain how the Sun’s energy heats the air, land, and water driving
the processes that result in the wind, ocean cur
rents, and the water cycle.

Earth and Space Systems


Describe how human activities have changed the land, water, and
atmosphere.

Weather and Climate


Earth and Space Systems


Explain how the sun’s energy heats the air, land, and water driving
the process
es that result in wind, ocean currents, and the water cycle.

Earth and Space Systems


Describe how human activities have changed the land, water, and
atmosphere.

Science, Engineering, and Technology


Identify the appropriate materials to be used to solve

a
problem based on their specific properties and characteristics.



Human Impact on Earth


Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
5




Explain how the sun’s energy heats the air, land, and water, driving the processes that result in
wind, ocean currents, and the water cycle.

Describe how human acti
vities have changed the land, water, and atmosphere.


Life over Time


Life Science


Understand the predictability of characteristics being passed from parents to
offspring.

Life Science


Explain how a particular environment selects for traits that
increase the likelihood
of survival and reproduction by individuals bearing those traits.

Science, Engineering, and Technology


Identify the appropriate materials to be used to solve a
problem based on their specific properties and characteristics.

Reprod
uction and Heredity


Understand the predictability of characteristics being passed from parents to offspring.

Explain how a particular environment selects for traits that increase the likelihood of survival
and reproduction by individuals bearing those tra
its.

DNA and Modern Genetics


Understand the predictability of characteristics being passed from parents to offspring.

Explain how a particular environment selects for traits that increase the likelihood of survival
and reproduction by individuals bearing
those traits.







8
th

Grade

Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
6




Unit 1


Nature of Science
(
total days for Unit 1 = 19
)

Students gain scientific knowledge by observing the natural and constructed world, performing
and evaluating investigations and communicating their findings. These principles should guide
student work and be integrated into the curriculum along with the co
ntent standards on a daily
basis.

Indiana Academic Standards:

Process Standards:

8.1 Make predictions and develop testable questions based on research and prior knowledge.
(L3)

8.2 Plan and carry out investigations as a class, in small groups or independ
ently often over a
period of several class lessons. (L3)

8.3 Collect quantitative data with appropriate tools or technologies and use appropriate units
to label numerical data. (L1,3,4)

8.4 Incorporate variables that can be changed, measured or controlled.

(L3)

8.5 Use the principles of accuracy and precision when making measurement. (L3)

8.6 Test predictions with multiple trials. (L3)

8.7 Keep accurate records in a notebook during investigations. (L3)

8.8 Analyze data, using appropriate mathematical
manipulation as required, and use it to
identify patterns and make inferences based on these patterns. (L3,4)

8.9 Evaluate possible causes for differing results (valid data). (L3)

8.10 Compare the results of an experiment with the prediction. (L1,3)

8.11 C
ommunicate findings using graphs, charts, maps and models through oral and written
reports. (L4)

Essential Questions



What are t
he characteristics of science
?



How do scientists develop explanations
?



How do scientists discover things
?

Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
7






How do scientists show

the results of investigations?



How do scientists and society work together?

Standard Based Resources



Indiana Science Fusion Textbook (Hard Copy and Online)



Indiana Science Fusion Student Edition with Audio (Differentiated)



Indiana Science Fusion Lab Manua
l



Indiana Science Fusion Virtual Labs



Think Central (Digital)



ScienceSaurus (Student Handbook)



Science News Magazine

Lessons / Topics
(total days)

Lesson 1


What is Science? (3)

Lesson 2


Scientific Knowledge (2)

Lesson 3


Scientific Investigations (3)

Lesson 4


Representing Data (3)

Lesson 5


Science and Society (3)

Instructional Strategies/Differentiated Instruction



All Groups

o

Grouping/Teams

o

Class Discussions

o

Small Group Discussions

o

Choice of End Products (see appendix C)

o

Blooms Taxonomy Questioning
(see appendix B)

o

Alternate Instruction

o

Technology Assisted

o

Inquiry/Problem Based Learning Activities



Below Level

o

Modified Instructional Time

o

Targeted Assistance

o

Reduction of Material

Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
8




o

Recall and Application Questions



At Level

o

Analysis and Synthesis Question
s



Above Level

o

Synthesis and Evaluation Questions

Assessments

Unit Pre
-
Post Exam

Unit Project: Proposal for independent scientific investigation

Lesson Quizzes (1 per lesson)

Essential Question Essay Test(s)

Outline of Key Topics

Lesson 1


What is Scienc
e?



Definition of science



Scientific explanations:

o

Theories

o

Laws



Traits of Scientists



Science and Pseudoscience

Lesson 2


Scientific Knowledge



Developing explanations


hypotheses



Supporting theories



Evaluating evidence

Lesson 3


Scientific Investigations



Conducting a scientific investigation



Types of scientific investigations



Characteristics of good scientific investigations

Lesson 4


Representing Data



Tables

Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
9






Graphs



Models

Lesson 5


Science and Society



Impact of science on society



Science and decision
-
m
aking

Key Vocabulary

science, empirical evidence, pseudoscience, experiment, observation, hypothesis,

independent variable, dependent variable, data, model, society, economics, politics


Unit 2


Matter

(
total days for Unit 2 = 28
)


Physical Science
-

Describe how atomic structure determines chemical properties and how
atoms and molecules interact.

Science, Engineering, and Technology


Identify the appropriate materials to be used to solve a
problem based on their specific propertie
s and characteristics.

Indiana Academic Standards:

Standard 1
-

Physical Science:

8.1.1 Explain that all matter is composed of particular arrangements of atoms of approximately
one hundred elements. (L3,4,5)

8.1.2 Understand that elements are organized on

the periodic table based on atomic number.
(L5)

8.1.3 Explain how the arrangement of atoms and molecules determines chemical properties of
substances. (L6)

8.1.4 Describe the structure of an atom and relate the arrangement of electrons to how that
atom in
teracts with other atoms. (L4.6)

8.1.5 Explain that atoms join together to form molecules and compounds and illustrate with
diagrams the relationship between atoms and compounds and/or molecules. (L3,6)

Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
10




8.1.6 Explain that elements and compounds have charac
teristic properties such as density,
boiling points and melting points that remain unchanged regardless of the sample size. (L1,3)

8.1.7 Explain that chemical changes occur when substances react and form one or more
different products, whose physical and c
hemical properties are different from those of the
reactants. (L2,6)

8.1.8 Demonstrate that in a chemical change, the total numbers of each kind of atom in the
product are the same as in the reactants and that the total mass of the reacting system is
conse
rved. (L2,6)

Essential Questions



What are the physical and chemical properties of matter
?



What are physical and chemical changes of matter
?



How do pure substances and mixtures compare?



What makes up an atom?



How are elements arranged on the periodic table
?



How do atoms interact?

Standard Based Resources



Indiana Science Fusion Textbook (Hard Copy and Online)



Indiana Science Fusion Student Edition with Audio (Differentiated)



Indiana Science Fusion Lab Manual



Indiana Science Fusion Virtual Labs



Think Central
(Digital)



ScienceSaurus (Student Handbook)



Science News Magazine



Project Lead The Way ()

Lessons / Topics
(total days)

Lesson 1


Properties of Matter (4)

Lesson 2


Physical and Chemical Changes (4)

Lesson 3


Pure Substances and Mixtures (4)

Lesson 4


The Atom (3)

Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
11




Lesson 5


The Periodic Table (4)

Lesson 6


Interactions of Atoms (4)

Instructional Strategies/Differentiated Instruction



All Groups

o

Grouping/Teams

o

Class Discussions

o

Small Group Discussions

o

Choice of End Products (see appendix C)

o

Blooms Taxon
omy Questioning (see appendix B)

o

Alternate Instruction

o

Technology Assisted


o

Inquiry/Problem Based Learning Activities



Below Level

o

Modified Instructional Time

o

Targeted Assistance

o

Reduction of Material

o

Recall and Application Questions



At Level

o

Analysis and S
ynthesis Questions



Above Level

o

Synthesis and Evaluation Questions

Assessments

Unit Pre
-
Post Exam

Unit Project:
to be determined

Lesson Quizzes (1 per lesson)

Essential Question Essay Test(s)


Outline of Key Topics

Lesson 1


Properties of Matter

Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
12






Physical

properties



Chemical properties



Comparing physical and chemical properties



Using properties to identify unknown substances

Lesson 2


Physical and Chemical Changes



Physical change



Chemical change



Comparing physical and chemical change



Law of Conservation
of Mass


Lesson 3


Pure Substances and Mixtures



How particles combine



Pure substances: elements and compounds



Mixtures

Lesson 4


The Atom



Atomic Theory



The parts of the atom

Lesson 5


The Periodic Table



Information on the Periodic Table



The
arrangement of elements on the Periodic Table

Lesson 6


Interactions of Atoms



Chemical bonds and chemical changes



Chemical equations



Modeling chemical bonds


Key Vocabulary


Physical property, chemical property, physical change, chemical change, law of co
nservation of
mass, atom, element, compound, mixture, pure substance, heterogeneous, homogeneous,
Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
13




proton, neutron, nucleus, electron, electron cloud, atomic number, mass number, periodic table,
chemical symbol, average atomic mass, metal, nonmetal, metallo
id, group, period, chemical
bond, molecule, chemical equation, chemical formula, reactant, product, valence electron


Unit 3


Energy in the Earth System

(
total days for Unit 3 = 24
)

Earth and Space Systems


Explain how the Sun’s energy heats the air,
land, and water driving
the processes that result in the wind, ocean currents, and the water cycle.

Earth and Space Systems


Describe how human activities have changed the land, water, and
atmosphere.

Indiana Academic Standards:

Standard 2: Earth and Spa
ce Systems:

8.2.1


recognize and demonstrate how the sun’s energy drives convection in the atmosphere
and in bodies of water, which results in ocean currents and weather patterns. (L1
-
5)

8.2.2


Describe and model how water moves through the earth’s crus
t, atmosphere, and
oceans in a cyclic way, as liquid, vapor, and solid. (L1)

8.2.3


Describe the characteristics of ocean currents and identify their effects on weather
patterns. (L1,5)

8.2.4


Describe the physical and chemical composition of the atmosph
ere at different
elevations. (L1,2)

Essential Questions



What are the parts of the Earth system
?



What is the atmosphere
?



How does energy move through Earth’s system
?



What is wind
?



H
ow does water move in the ocean
?

Standard Based Resources



Indiana Science
Fusion Textbook (Hard Copy and Online)



Indiana Science Fusion Student Edition with Audio (Differentiated)

Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
14






Indiana Science Fusion Lab Manual



Indiana Science Fusion Virtual Labs



Think Central (Digital)



ScienceSaurus (Student Handbook)



Science News Magazine



P
roject Lead The Way ()

Lessons / Topics
(total days)

Lesson 1


Earth’s Spheres (4)

Lesson 2


The Atmosphere (2)

Lesson 3


Energy Transfer (4)

Lesson 4


Wind in the Atmosphere (4)

Lesson 5


Ocean Currents (5)

Instructional Strategies/Differentiated Ins
truction



All Groups

o

Grouping/Teams

o

Class Discussions

o

Small Group Discussions

o

Choice of End Products (see appendix C)

o

Blooms Taxonomy Questioning (see appendix B)

o

Alternate Instruction

o

Technology Assisted

o

Inquiry/Problem Based Learning Activities



Below
Level

o

Modified Instructional Time

o

Targeted Assistance

o

Reduction of Material

o

Recall and Application Questions



At Level

o

Analysis and Synthesis Questions



Above Level

o

Synthesis and Evaluation Questions

Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
15




Assessments

Unit Pre
-
Post Exam

Unit Project:
to be determ
ined

Lesson Quizzes (1 per lesson)

Essential Question Essay Test(s)

Outline of Key Topics

Lesson 1


Earth’s Spheres



Earth system and geosphere



Hydrosphere and cryosphere



Atmosphere and biosphere



Earth’s spheres interact

Lesson 2


The Atmosphere



Composition, air pressure, and temperature of the atmosphere



Structure of the atmosphere



Life and the atmosphere

Lesson 3


Energy Transfer



Temperature, heat, thermal energy, and thermal expansion



Radiation



Convection



Conduction

Lesson 4


Wind in the Atm
osphere



The movement of air



Global winds



Local winds

Lesson 5


Ocean Currents



Surface currents in the ocean



Deep currents in the ocean

Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
16






Upwelling



Ocean circulation

Key Vocabulary

Earth system, geosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, atmosphere, biosphere, a
ir pressure,
thermosphere, mesosphere, stratosphere, troposphere, ozone layer, greenhouse effect
, thermal
energy, thermal expansion, radiation, convection, conduction, wind, Coriolis effect, jet stream,
ocean current, surface current, upwelling, convection

current, deep current


Unit 4


Weather and Climate

(
total days for Unit 4 = 26
)

Earth and Space Systems


Explain how the sun’s energy heats the air, land, and water driving
the processes that result in wind, ocean currents, and the water cycle.

Earth
and Space Systems


Describe how human activities have changed the land, water, and
atmosphere.

Science, Engineering, and Technology


Identify the appropriate materials to be used to solve a
problem based on their specific properties and characteristics.

Indiana Academic Standards:

Standard 2


Earth and Space Systems:

8.2.1 Recognize and demonstrate how the sun’s energy drives convection in the atmosphere
and in bodies of water, which results in ocean currents and weather patterns. (L1,3,5)

8.2.2 Describ
e and model how water moves through the Earth’s crust, atmosphere, and oceans
in a cyclical way, as liquid, vapor, and solid. (L1,2,3,5)

8.2.3 Describe the characteristics of ocean currents and identify their effects on weather
patterns. (L3,5)

8.2.5 Descr
ibe the conditions that cause Indiana weather and weather
-
related events such as
tornadoes, lake effect snow, blizzards, thunderstorms, and flooding. (L2,3,4,6)

Standard 4


Science, Engineering, and Technology
:

Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
17




8.4.1 Understand how the strength of attrac
tive forces between particles in a material helps to
explain many physical properties of the material, such as why different materials exist as gases,
liquids, or solids at a given temperature. (L6)

Essential Questions



How does water change state and move

around on Earth?



What is weather and how can we describe different types of weather?



How do the water cycle and weather patterns affect local weather?



How can humans protect themselves from hazardous weather?



How is climate affected by energy from the sun

and variations on Earth?



What are the weather and climate like in Indiana?

Standard Based Resources



Indiana Science Fusion Textbook (Hard Copy and Online)



Indiana Science Fusion Student Edition with Audio (Differentiated)



Indiana Science Fusion Lab Manual



Indiana Science Fusion Virtual Labs



Think Central (Digital)



ScienceSaurus (Student Handbook)



Science News Magazine

Lessons / Topics
(total days)

Lesson 1


The Water Cycle (4)

Lesson 2


Elements of Weather (2)

Lesson 3


What Influences Weather (3)

Lesson 4


Severe Weather and Weather Safety (4)

Lesson 5


Climate (5)

Lesson 6


Indiana Weather and Climate (3)

Instructional Strategies/Differentiated Instruction



All Groups

o

Grouping/Teams

Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
18




o

Class Discussions

o

Small Group Discussions

o

Choice of End Product
s (see appendix C)

o

Blooms Taxonomy Questioning (see appendix B)

o

Alternate Instruction

o

Technology Assisted


o

Inquiry/Problem Based Learning Activities



Below Level

o

Modified Instructional Time

o

Targeted Assistance

o

Reduction of Material

o

Recall and Application
Questions



At Level

o

Analysis and Synthesis Questions



Above Level

o

Synthesis and Evaluation Questions

Assessments

Unit Pre
-
Post Exam

Unit Project:
PLTW Windmill Project

Lesson Quizzes (1 per lesson)

Essential Question Essay Test(s)

Outline of Key Topics

Lesson 1


The Water Cycle



Water cycle and change of state



Water in the atmosphere



Water in the oceans and on land



Transport of matter and energy

Lesson 2


Elements of Weather



Elements of weather



Measuring elements of weather

Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
19




Lesson 3


What Influences
Weather



How the water cycle influences weather



How patterns in the atmosphere affect weather



How patterns in the ocean affect weather

Lesson 4


Severe Weather and Weather Safety



Hazardous weather



Safety and weather

Lesson 5


Climate



Climate versus wea
ther



Solar energy and climate



Other factors that affect climate



Climate zones

Lesson 6


Indiana Weather and Climate



Indiana weather



Indiana climate

Key Vocabulary

Water cycle, evaporation, transpiration, sublimation, condensation, precipitation, weather,
humidity, relative humidity, dew point, visibility, air mass, front, thunderstorm, lightning,
thunder, hurricane, storm surge, tornado, climate, latitude, topography, elevation, lake
-
effect
snow, blizzard





Unit 5


Human Impact on Earth

(
total days for
Unit 5 = 20
)

Explain how the sun’s energy heats the air, land, and water, driving the processes that result in
wind, ocean currents, and the water cycle.

Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
20




Describe how human activities have changed the land, water, and atmosphere.

Indiana Academic Standards:

Standard 2


Earth and Space Systems:

8.2.6 Identify, explain, and discuss some effects human activities have on the biosphere, such as
air, soil, light, noise and water pollution. (L2,3,4,5)

8.2.7 Recognize that some of Earth’
s resources are finite and describe how recycling, reducing
consumption and the development of alternatives can reduce the rate of their depletion. (L1,5)

8.2.8 Explain that human activities, beginning with the earliest herding and agricultural
activities,

have drastically changed the environment and have affected the capacity of the
environment to support native species. Explain current efforts to reduce and eliminate these
impacts and encourage sustainability. (L2,3,4,5)

Essential Questions



What are Eart
h’s natural resources?



What impact can humans have on land resources and soil quality?



What impact can human activity have on water quality?



What impact can human activities have on air quality?



How can Earth’s resources be used wisely?

Standard Based Reso
urces



Indiana Science Fusion Textbook (Hard Copy and Online)



Indiana Science Fusion Student Edition with Audio (Differentiated)



Indiana Science Fusion Lab Manual



Indiana Science Fusion Virtual Labs



Think Central (Digital)



ScienceSaurus (Student Handbook)



Science News Magazine



Project Lead The Way ()

Lessons / Topics
(total days)

Lesson 1


Natural Resources (3)

Lesson 2


Human Impact on Land (3)

Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
21




Lesson 3


Human Impact on Water (3)

Lesson 4


Human Impact on Atmosphere (3)

Lesson 5


Protecting Earth’s Wa
ter, Land, and Air (3)

Instructional Strategies/Differentiated Instruction



All Groups

o

Grouping/Teams

o

Class Discussions

o

Small Group Discussions

o

Choice of End Products (see appendix C)

o

Blooms Taxonomy Questioning

o

Alternate Instruction

o

Technology Assisted

o

Inq
uiry/Problem Based Learning Activities



Below Level

o

Modified Instructional Time

o

Targeted Assistance

o

Reduction of Material

o

Recall and Application Questions



At Level

o

Analysis and Synthesis Questions



Above Level

o

Synthesis and Evaluation Questions

Assessments

Unit Pre
-
Post Exam

Unit Project:
to be determined

Lesson Quizzes (1 per lesson)Essential Question Essay Test(s)

Outline of Key Topics

Lesson 1


Natural Resources



Natural resources



Renewable and nonrenewable resources

Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
22






Material and energy resources

Lesson

2


Human Impact on Land



How humans use land



Land degradation

Lesson 3


Human Impact on Water



Water as a resource



Water pollution



Water quality



Water supply and flow

Lesson 4


Human Impact on Atmosphere



Air and air pollution



Effects of human
activities on atmosphere



Air quality and health



Air pollution and Earth

Lesson 5


Protecting Earth’s Water, Land, and Air



Conservation and stewardship



Preservation and conservation of water



Land management and conservation



Reducing air pollution

Key Voca
bulary

Natural resource, renewable resource, nonrenewable resource, fossil fuel, material resource,
energy resource, urbanization, land degradation, deforestation, desertification, water pollution,
thermal pollution, eutrophication, potable, reservoir, Gre
enhouse effect, particulate, air
pollution, smog, acid precipitation, air quality, conservation, stewardship

Unit 6


Life over Time

(
total days for Unit 6 = 15
)

Life Science


Understand the predictability of characteristics being passed from parents to
o
ffspring.

Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
23




Life Science


Explain how a particular environment selects for traits that increase the likelihood
of survival and reproduction by individuals bearing those traits.

Science, Engineering, and Technology


Identify the appropriate materials to be
used to solve a
problem based on their specific properties and characteristics.

Indiana Academic Standards:

Standard 3


Life Science:

8.3.1 Explain that reproduction is essential for the continuation of every species and is the
mechanism by which all
organisms transmit genetic information. (L1)

8.3.5 Identify and describe the difference between inherited traits and physical and behavioral
traits that are acquired or learned. (L1)

8.3.6 Observe anatomical structures of a variety of organisms and describ
e their similarities and
differences. Use the data collected to organize the organisms into groups and predict their
relatedness. (L2,3)

8.3.7 Recognize and explain that small genetic differences between parents and offspring can
accumulate in successive g
enerations so that descendants may be different from their
ancestors. (L1)

8.3.8 Examine traits of individuals within a population of organisms that may give them an
advantage in survival and reproduction in a given environment or when the environment
chan
ges. (L1)

8.3.9 Describe the effect of environmental changes on populations of organisms when their
adaptive characteristics put them at a disadvantage for survival. Describe how extinction of a
species can ultimately result. (L1)

8.3.10 Recognize and desc
ribe how new varieties of organisms have come about from selective
breeding. (L1)


Standard 4


Science, Engineering, and Technology:

8.4.3 Investigate the properties (mechanical, chemical, thermal, magnetic, and optical) of
natural and engineered material
s. (L1)

Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
24




Essential Questions



What is the theory of evolution by natural selection?



What evidence supports the theory of evolution?



How are organisms classified?

Standard Based Resources



Indiana Science Fusion Textbook (Hard Copy and Online)



Indiana Science

Fusion Student Edition with Audio (Differentiated)



Indiana Science Fusion Lab Manual



Indiana Science Fusion Virtual Labs



Think Central (Digital)



ScienceSaurus (Student Handbook)



Sc
i
ence

News Magazine

Lessons / Topics
(total days)

Lesson 1


Theory of Evol
ution by Natural Selection (4)

Lesson 2


Evidence of Evolution (3)

Lesson 3


Classification of Living Things (3)

Instructional Strategies/Differentiated Instruction



All Groups

o

Grouping/Teams

o

Class Discussions

o

Small Group Discussions

o

Choice of End Product
s (see appendix C)

o

Blooms Taxonomy Questioning(see appendix B)

o

Alternate Instruction

o

Technology Assisted

o

Inquiry/Problem Based Learning Activities



Below Level

o

Modified Instructional Time

o

Targeted Assistance

o

Reduction of Material

o

Recall and Application
Questions

Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
25






At Level

o

Analysis and Synthesis Questions



Above Level

o

Synthesis and Evaluation Questions

Assessments

Unit Pre
-
Post Exam

Unit Project(s):
to be determined

Lesson Quizzes (1 per lesson)

Essential Question Essay Test(s)

Outline of Key Topics

Lesson 1


Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection



Charles Darwin’s observations



Natural selection



Extinction and environmental change

Lesson 2


Evidence of Evolution



Fossil evidence



Structural evidence



Genetic evidence



Embryological evidence

Lesson 3


Classification of Living Things



Classification and shared characteristics



Naming organisms and levels of classification



Domains



Kingdoms, branching diagrams, and dichotomous keys


Key Vocabulary

Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
26




Evolution, artificial selection, natural selectio
n, variation, adaptation, extinction, fossil, fossil
record, species, genus, domain, bacteria, Archaea, Eukarya, Animalia, Plantae, Protista, Fungi,
dichotomous key


Unit 7


Reproduction and Heredity

(
total days for Unit 7 = 23
)

Understand the predictabil
ity of characteristics being passed from parents to offspring.

Explain how a particular environment selects for traits that increase the likelihood of survival
and reproduction by individuals bearing those traits.

Indiana Academic Standards:

Standard 3


Life Science:

8.3.1 Explain that reproduction is essential for the continuation of every species and is the
mechanism by which all organisms transmit genetic information. (L1,3)

8.3.2 Compare and contrast the transmission of genetic information in sexual a
nd asexual
reproduction. (L3)

8.3.3 Explain that genetic information is transmitted from parents to offspring mostly by
chromosomes. (L1,2,3,4)

8.3.4 Understand the relationship between deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), genes, and
chromosomes. (L1,4)

8.3.5 Iden
tify and describe the difference between inherited traits and physical and behavioral
traits that are acquired or learned. (L4)

Essential Questions



How do cells divide?



How do cells divide for sexual reproduction?



How do organisms reproduce?



How are trait
s inherited?



How are patterns of inheritance studied?

Standard Based Resources

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th

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27






Indiana Science Fusion Textbook (Hard Copy and Online)



Indiana Science Fusion Student Edition with Audio (Differentiated)



Indiana Science Fusion Lab Manual



Indiana Science
Fusion Virtual Labs



Think Central (Digital)



ScienceSaurus (Student Handbook)



Science News Magazine

Lessons / Topics
(total days)

Lesson 1


Mitosis (4)

Lesson 2


Meiosis (4)

Lesson 3


Sexual and Asexual Reproduction (3)

Lesson 4


Heredity (4)

Lesson 5


Punnett Squares and Pedigrees (3)

Instructional Strategies/Differentiated Instruction



All Groups

o

Grouping/Teams

o

Class Discussions

o

Small Group Discussions

o

Choice of End Products (see appendix C)

o

Blooms Taxonomy Questioning (see appendix B)

o

Alternate Instru
ction

o

Technology Assisted

o

Inquiry/Problem Based Learning Activities



Below Level

o

Modified Instructional Time

o

Targeted Assistance

o

Reduction of Material

o

Recall and Application Questions



At Level

o

Analysis and Synthesis Questions



Above Level

o

Synthesis and
Evaluation Questions

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th

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28




Assessments

Unit Pre
-
Post Exam

Unit Project(s):
Delta Science Module: DNA


from genes to protiens

Lesson Quizzes (1 per lesson)

Essential Question Essay Test(s)

Outline of Key Topics

Lesson 1


Mitosis



Why cells divide



Genetic mate
rial and cell division



Mitosis

Lesson 2


Meiosis



Sex cells



Meiosis



Steps of Meiosis



Meiosis versus Mitosis

Lesson 3


Sexual and Asexual Reproduction



Asexual reproduction



Sexual reproduction



Comparing asexual and sexual reproduction

Lesson 4


Heredity



Mendel’s work



DNA’s role in inheritance



Genes, traits, and characteristics

Lesson 5


Punnett Squares and Pedigrees



Punnett squares



Pedigrees

Key Vocabulary

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th

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29




DNA, chromosomes, cell cycle, interphase, mitosis, cytokinesis, homologous chromosomes,
meiosis,
asexual reproduction, sexual reproduction, fertilization, heredity, gene, allele,
genotype, phenotype, dominant, recessive, incomplete dominance, codominance, probability,
ratio, Punnett square, pedigree


Unit 8


DNA and Modern Genetics

(
total days for
Unit 8 = 10
)

Understand the predictability of characteristics being passed from parents to offspring.

Explain how a particular environment selects for traits that increase the likelihood of survival
and reproduction by individuals bearing those traits.

Ind
iana Academic Standards:

Standard 3


Life Science:

8.3.4 Understand the relationship between deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), genes, and
chromosomes. (L1,4)

8.3.10 Recognize and describe how new varieties of organisms have come about from selective
breeding.

(L1)

Essential Questions



What is DNA?



How does biotechnology impact our world?

Standard Based Resources



Indiana Science Fusion Textbook (Hard Copy and Online)



Indiana Science Fusion Student Edition with Audio (Differentiated)



Indiana Science Fusion Lab
Manual



Indiana Science Fusion Virtual Labs



Think Central (Digital)



ScienceSaurus (Student Handbook)



Science News Magazine



DNA Resource (Delta Science Module)



DNA Learning Center (Online Website)

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th

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Lessons / Topics
(total days)

Lesson 1


DNA Structure and Fu
nction (4)

Lesson 2


Biotechnology (3)

Instructional Strategies/Differentiated Instruction



All Groups

o

Grouping/Teams

o

Class Discussions

o

Small Group Discussions

o

Choice of End Products (see appendix C)

o

Blooms Taxonomy Questioning (see appendix B)

o

Alternate
Instruction

o

Technology Assisted

o

Inquiry/Problem Based Learning Activities



Below Level

o

Modified Instructional Time

o

Targeted Assistance

o

Reduction of Material

o

Recall and Application Questions



At Level

o

Analysis and Synthesis Questions



Above Level

o

Synthesis and

Evaluation Questions

Assessments

Unit Pre
-
Post Exam

Unit Project(s): Protein Synthesis Activity

Lesson Quizzes (1 per lesson)

Essential Question Essay Test(s)

Outline of Key Topics

Lesson 1


DNA Structure and Function

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th

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DNA structure



DNA replication



Mut
ations



DNA transcription and translation

Lesson 2


Biotechnology



Applications of biotechnology



Biotechnology and society

Key Vocabulary

DNA, nucleotide, replication, mutation, RNA, ribosome, biotechnology, artificial selection,
genetic engineering, clone













Literacy integration Plan

Will incorporate an extensive reading and writing plan based on an approach by Creech and
Hale, in collaboration with the Strategic Literacy Initiative at WestEd. (*see appendix A for
complete details)

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th

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Literacy Plan

Outline


1
st

Quarter:

Metacognitive Logs


a yearlong literacy routine.



Science in the News


a yearlong literacy routine.

2
nd

Quarter:



Read a nonfiction science book, then write a children’s science book.

3
rd

Quarter:

Read a biography of a scientist,

then write and present a historical vignette based on
that historical figure.

4
th

Quarter:


Read a work of fiction


science related, then participate in a journaling and “book club”
sharing activity.









Appendix A


“Literacy in Science: A Natural Fit”

Reading is an essential part of science literacy, but what, when, and how can we incorporate
reading in the science classroom? Like many of my colleagues, I avoided relying on the textbook
by engaging stud
ents in lectures, hands
-
on activities, demonstrations, and videos.
Unfortunately, as each year passed, my students read less while I worked harder.

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I wanted students to become the scientifically literate citizens envisioned in the National
Science Educatio
n Standards: students who read science, enjoy reading science, and even
experience the passion I feel for the natural world. However, with 65% of incoming freshmen at
my school reading below the sixth
-
grade level, it was clear that our science curriculum,
especially the textbook, did not include motivating or accessible reading for most students. To
bring reading back into our science classrooms, my colleague, Ann Akey, and I designed four
quarterly reading projects with yearlong literacy routines that we u
se successfully with our
ninth
-
grade students, including English language learners.

An inquiry approach to literacy and science

We created these projects as part of a three
-
year professional inquiry into literacy in science
with our colleagues at the Strat
egic Literacy Initiative at WestEd. The two yearlong literacy
routines we developed are based on Reading Apprenticeship, an instructional framework
offered by the Strategic Literac
y Initiative (Schoenbach et al.
Promoting s
tudent literacy
through inquiry A

Natural Fit in LITERACY
Jan
et Creech and Gina Hale February 2006
1999) to
support middle and high school student literacy in content areas. Reading Apprenticeship
encourages reading in classrooms as an active problem
-
solving process. Students and teachers

engage in a shared inquiry into literacy by taking mental risks as they read together and discuss
their reading processes, confusions, and methods of resolution. Creating a classroom climate
that supports inquiry is essential to both science and literacy
learning. This connection to
inquiry made the Reading Apprenticeship approach a natural fit in our science classrooms
(Schoenbach et al. 2003).

Yearlong metacognitive conversation

To begin our classroom inquiries into science literacy, we talk about our th
inking processes
every day as we delve into lab procedures, graphs, data tables, and all the different “texts” of
science. I model talking aloud about my own thinking processes and encourage students to
“think aloud” about how they make sense of what they
are doing. Through this metacognitive
conversation, students learn that text includes labs, data, and their own work, and that reading
is an active problem
-
solving process.

As this way of working becomes comfortable and routine, I teach students to record
their
thinking by writing down their confusions, questions, connections, clarifications, and
summaries in “Metacognitive Reading Logs.”[Editor’s note: The tools and projects described in
this article, including Metacognitive Logs, were created by the autho
r and can be downloaded
from the Reading Apprenticeship website at http://wested.org/stratlit.]

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As a yearlong literacy routine, these logs take on different forms depending on their purpose.
Some are as simple as a vertical line drawn down the center of a
piece of binder paper with an
“I read” heading on the left and an “I thought” heading on the right. At other times logs may
contain a series of sentence stems to choose among and complete such as “I was confused by”
or “This reminded me of.”

Often students

are asked to write questions, short summaries, or personal connections to what
they are reading. Some logs have a printed format, some are kept in spiral notebooks, and
others are simply written on the edges of the reading handout itself. This routine met
acognitive
writing and co
nversation sup
ports students throughout the year as they encounter more
difficult texts and complex reading tasks. Once we establish this foundation, we are ready to
expand our reading experiences.

Four non
-
textbook reading project
s

We begin our reading projects in the first quarter with “Science in the News” (SIN), which we
also continue throughout the year

along with the Metacognitive Logs

as a yearlong literacy
routine. In the second quarter we introduce a nonfiction reading proj
ect and accompanying
children’s science book writing project. In the third quarter students read a biography of a
scientist and present Interactive Historical Vignettes (Roack and Wandersee 1993). In the fourth
quarter, students read fiction books and part
icipate in book clubs (Steineke 2002). Although we
sequenced these projects to take advantage of students’ growing skills, motivation, and
stamina, any of these projects can be used independently of the others (Figure 1).

Science in the News

To help
students read, evaluate, and discuss scientific issues and findings that appear in popular
media, we developed SIN, a format to help students have an informed scientific perspective.
Figure 2 summarizes the student objectives of SIN.

We assigned the first
SIN as homework, providing a structured report format and instructions
to find a science article in a newspaper or magazine (Figure 3). We thought our highly
structured report format would help students read deeply. Looking at student work samples,
however
, we realized that even with relatively accessible text, such as the daily newspaper,
students were not able to read and respond to the science without more help. The report
format was not enough support; we had to teach our students how to read science in

the news.

I started by finding an article to read and discuss in class. In small groups, students read the
article and completed a SIN reading together, discussing how they approached highlighting the
methods and results and how they constructed summaries
. Teams shared their results with the
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whole class while I recorded their reading strategies on an overhead. Later we read anonymous
student work samples, evaluating them using our new understandings of how to read SIN.

Our efforts paid off. With practice,
students are able to do the SIN reading activities
independently. Teams discuss the science in the reading, instead of how to read the science.
Working together, students become expert readers of science in the news. More importantly,
we are learning that
science literacy is not a fixed object; people are not good readers or
nonreaders, but evolving readers. Figure 4 (p. 26) shows the grading rubric for this project.

Read a nonfiction book and write a children’s science book

In the fall our classes make a trek to the school library’s nonfiction science section. We give
students a chart that describes where science topics can be found and let students look for a
book that interests them. Once they find one, we negotiate. Because our goals for this project
are to build fluency, stamina, and motivation as well as general sc
ience knowledge, our focus is
helping students find books that genuinely interest them and that are not too difficult. As a
result, I start to see science
-
based library books appearing at Sustained Silent Reading

20
minutes of reading a

day, a school

wide
policy

instead of magazines and newspapers.


FIGURE 1




FIGURE 2

Monthly Science in the News objectives.



Highlight the research methods or procedures.



Highlight in a different color the results or conclusions.

First quarter

Second quarter

Thi
rd quarter

Fourth quarter

Metacognitive Logs (Yearlong literacy routine)

Science in the News (Yearlong literacy routine)

Introduction to metacognitive
conversation, Metacognitive
Logs, Science in the News

Read a nonf iction science
book

Write a children’s science
book

Read the biography of a
scientist

Present a historical vignette

Read a f iction book with

good
science

Book club discussions

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th

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36






Use highlighting to summarize procedures and results.



Report the name and expertise of a researcher or scientist involved.



Draw a picture or diagram of an important aspect of the research.



Compose a brief summary of the big idea.



Ask a question of

the researchers or the author.

During the next four to five weeks students complete most of their reading outside of class with
the support of teacher
-
generated Metacognitive Logs designed specifically for nonfiction text. I
collect and check these logs w
eekly to give students written encouragement on their progress.
When they finish reading, students demonstrate their understanding of the topic by writing and
illustrating a children’s science book on the same subject.

Tapping into students’ interests prod
uces some amazing results and encourages student
engagement. One English language learner filled her book with photos and descriptions of her
own beloved parrots. Another student, who produced little other work during the year, wrote a
book about lizards,
which he proudly shared. Many students chose their children’s book
projects (from their science class!) to include in their schoolwide assessment portfolios as
evidence for meeting reading and writing expectations.

Read a scientist’s biography and present
an interactive historical vignette

Empowering students with personal knowledge about real scientists and the work they do is
our primary goal for the biography project. For instance, during a class discussion of the
Tacoma Narrows Bridge failure, a student

who had just finished Joseph Strauss’ biography for
his reading project eagerly explained that Strauss, who designed the Golden Gate Bridge,
planned for the bridge to flex up and down several feet to prevent a failure like the Tacoma
Narrows disaster.

Whe
n we initially introduced the biography project, we reencountered a familiar problem. We
lacked motivating and accessible text to read. Our library had a scant collection of dusty,
unused volumes of “classics.” Over the next three years, we added biographi
es of women
scientists, such as A Feeling for the Organism:

FIGURE 3

Science in the News report student handout.

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th

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37




Name: ____________________________________________________________Period:
____________________________________________________________Month:
__
__________________________________________________________Topic:
_____________________________________________________________Due date:
__________________________________________________________Internet use (circle one):

No Yes (any reputable source) Yes (
Newsbank only)

Directions:

1. Find an article about scientific research/observations that was published in a newspaper,
magazine or journal during the month listed above. The article must be at least 200 words long.

2. Read the article and write down what
the scientists were trying to find out (what question
were they trying to answer)?

3. Underline, in two different colors, the following information (color in the boxes to make a
key).



The methods the scientists were using (procedure) and the type of data

collected.



What the scientists found out (results and conclusion).

4. Answer the questions below.

5. Staple the article, or a copy of it, to the back of this page.

6. Turn in this assignment on or before the due date listed above.

Questions:

1. a) Title

of the article _______________________________________________b) Topic of the
article ______________________________________________c) Author(s)
______________________________________________________d) Source of article (name of
newspaper, magazine, addre
ss/URL and name of internet site)
_____________________________________________________

2. a) Write the full name and title (if given) of a person quoted in the article. (If no one is
quoted, choose a different article.)

b) Why was this person quoted? What

is his/her expertise?

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3. How did scientists obtain the evidence on which this article is based? What steps did they
follow, what types of tools did they use, and what type of data did they collect?

4. Draw a diagram of the important information explained
in this article. Label your drawing
with words/descriptions.

5. Write a summary of this article. Your summary must be at least four complete sentences in
your own words. Do not use direct quotes from the article.

6. Do some more thinking about this article
. Write at least one “on my own” question that you
would like to ask the author or the scientists involved.

26 The Science Teacher

The Life and Work of Barbara McClintock (Keller 1983); scientists of color, such as Charles Drew:
Life
-
Saving Scientist (Shap
iro 1997); contemporary researchers, such as The Beak of the Finch
(Weiner 1994) about the work of Peter and Rosemary Grant; and the accessible biography
series Great Minds of Science and Scientists Who Changed the World. For a full list of the books
we ha
ve added, visit http://wested.org/stratlit and click on “Resources,” then “Resources for
Teachers,” and finally “Extensive Reading in Science.”

Once we had enough texts involving scientist biographies that students could and would read
independently, stude
nts could do most of the reading outside of class. We developed new
Metacognitive Log prompts to help students make connections to the influence of culture and
society on scientific thought. Once students finish their reading, they write 250
-
word vignettes

about a major event in the scientist’s life. They dress like their scientists, bring props
representing the scientists’ work, and read their vignettes in small groups. The “scientists” ask
their peers in these small groups to discuss opinions about their
work and discoveries.


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th

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As students present I walk around and listen. Within groups, students keep trac
k of each
other’s presentations

Question is related to article and thoughtful.by using a checklist to assure that all requ
ired
aspects of the scientist’s life are covered. Students are asked to use this checklist to prompt the
speaker if omissions occur, thus creating a collaborative approach to discovering the scientist’s
achievements with the reporting student serving as re
sident expert.

This is my favorite literacy activity of the year. I give extra credit if students make and wear a
life
-
size mask of the scientist’s face for their presentation. Later, I hang the masks around the
room to create a gallery of scientific great
s “participating” in class for the remainder of the
school year. Allowing students to assume identities of scientists is a powerful tool to help them
connect to the process of scientific discovery and the impact of political and religious beliefs on

Beginning


Developing


Proficient

Selection of

article

Not about science.

No authority quoted.

Source of article not
stated.

Fewer than 200 words.

Includes science
content.

Authority quoted.

Source stated.

200 words or more.

Includes scientific
research.

Authority quoted.

Reliable source stated.

200 words or more.

Understanding

of article

Highlighting misses
important points and/or
includes
extraneous
material.

Summary misses key
points and/or includes
nonessentials.

Most highlighting
correctly identifies
important points.

Summary shows
understanding of most
key points.

Highlighting shows
understanding of
scientific methodologies
and results.

Summary shows
understanding of all key
points.

Completion

One or more section not
attempted and/or partial
responses to prompt.

All sections attempted.

Responses do not
always address prompt.

All sections completed.

Responses address all
aspects of
theprompt.

Quality

Responses show limited
understanding of the
article.

Responses are not
written in complete
sentences.

Responses are
unorganized, hurried,
scattered, or messy,
with little evidence for
active engagement in
the project.

Question is
unrelated to
or answered in the
article.

Responses show partial
understanding of the
article.

Most responses are
written in complete
sentences.

Responses are poorly
organized and show
some engagement, with
attempts at responding
thoughtfully.

Question is r
elated to
article but tangential or
vague.

Responses show
evidence of
completeunderstanding
of the article.

All responses are written
in complete sentences.

Responses are
organized, show
attention to detail,
thoughtfulness, and
active engagement in
the pro
ject.

Question is related to
article and thoughtful.


Curriculum


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th

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the hi
story of scientific thought, as related to Content Standard G, The History and Nature of
Science (NRC 1996, p. 200).

Read a fiction book with good science content and participate in a book club

Do you remember reading something that hooked you on science

a

novel, or even a comic
book? This last project elicits raised eyebrows

popular fiction in a

FIGURE 5

Exampl es

of book cl ub opti ons.

Low readi ng l evel book choi ces

A Bone From A Dry Sea Peter Di cki nson

Jul i e of the Wol ves Jean George

The Mi ssi ng Gator of Gumbo Li mbo Jean George

There’s An Owl i n the Shower Jean George

Shark Beneath the Reef Jean George

Cl an Api s
Jay Hosl er

Medi um readi ng l evel book choi ces

The Core Dean Wesl ey Smi th

The Dechroni zati on of Sam Magruder George
Si mpson

The Perfect Storm Sebasti an Junger

Si ngul ari ty Wi lliam Sl eator

The House of the Scorpi on Nancy Farmer

Hi gh readi ng l evel book choi ces

The Andromeda Strai n Mi chael Cri chton

Jurassi c Park Mi chael Cri chton

Toxi n Robi n Cook

Rendezvous wi th Rama Arthur C. Cl arke

Curriculum


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th

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41




science class? When considering what students should read, we uncovered a closely guarded
secret: Science people love to
read good fiction about science. When reading fiction, we engage
with the ideas of science in imaginative and enjoyable ways that we might not when reading for
information. [Editor’s note: For more on science fiction in science class, see “Science Fiction
and
Scientific Literacy,” p. 38, in this issue of The Science Teacher.] We wanted students to have
access to this experience while providing opportunities for them to evaluate and discuss the
scientific ideas they encountered. Our critical reading and disc
ussion goals make the book clubs
our most demanding project, which is why we save it for last.

Book clubs are discussion groups of four to five students who have chosen to read the same
book. To facilitate book choice, I bring copies of the books to class
for students to look through
and talk about. They rank first, second, and third choices on an individual, reading
-
level
appropriate list. I use their choices to arrange book club groups. The book clubs meet twice a
week during 100
-
minute blocks, plan their

own reading schedules, and discuss their books. Each
student assembles and decorates a reading journal specifically designed for fiction narrative.
New Metacognitive Log prompts help students make connections to situations or characters in
the novel and a
nalyze the science presented in the story.

Students bring these journals with them to their book club and use them as the basis for group
discussions that often lead to new insights about the far
-
reaching impact of science in their
lives. As they contribut
e to scientific and literary conversations with their peers, students see
themselves as successful readers of science. (For examples of books, see Figure 5.)

Making progress

Three years into our inquiry, one thing is clear: Our students have become more ca
pable and
more willing science readers. Although many students read well below grade level, they could
still become science readers. Similarly, while we are not reading teachers, we can teach
students to read science. Our goals in beginning this inquiry we
re to improve student’s
attitudes toward science reading and give students the tools to become lifelong science
readers.

We made significant progress toward establishing the kind of scientific literacy that “expands
and deepens over a lifetime, not just du
ring the years in school” (NRC 1996, p. 22). By the end
of the school year, reading becomes an established routine in my classroom, and students’
attitudes about reading change dramatically. When I announce the first book project in the fall,
the general r
esponse is “What, we have to read the whole book?” By the time the last project
rolls around in late spring, students say, “Read another book? Okay, I can do that.”


Curriculum


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Janet Creech (jcreech@seq.org) is a teacher at Woodside High School, 199 Churchill Avenue

Woodside, CA 94062; and Gina Hale (ghale@wested.org) is a professional development
associate at WestEd, 300 Lakeside Drive, 25th Floor, Oakland, CA 94612.

References

Keller, E.F. 1983. A feeling for the organism: The life and work of Barbara Mc Clintock.
New
York: W.H. Freeman.

National Research Council (NRC). 1996. National science education standards. Washington, DC:
National Academy Press.

Reading Apprenticeship. http://wested.org/stratlit. Strategic Literacy Initiative at WestEd.

Roack, L.E., and J.H.
Wandersee. 1993. Short story science. The Science Teacher 60(6): 18

21.

Schoenbach, R., C. Greenleaf, C. Cziko, and L. Hurwitz. 1999. Reading for understanding: A guide
to improving reading in middle and high school classrooms. San Francisco, CA: Jossey
-
Ba
ss

Publishers.

Schoenbach, R., J. Braunger, C. Greenleaf, and C. Litman. 2003. Apprenticing adolescents to
reading in subject
-
area classrooms. Phi Delta Kappan October: 133

138.

Shapiro, M.J. 1997. Charles Drew: Life
-
saving scientist. Austin, TX: Raintree
Steck
-
Vaughn.

Steineke, N. 2002. Reading and writing together: Collaborative literacy in action. Portsmouth,
NH: Heinemann.

Weiner, J. 1994. The beak of the finch. New York: Alfred A. Knoph.








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Appendix B


Blooms Taxonomy Questioning


Curriculum


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th

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44

















Appendix C


Abbreviated list of Possible Student Products

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th

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45




A.

Artistic products





architecture



murals



decoration



sculpture



filmstrips



slide shows



comic strips



yearbook



advertisements



drawing



graphic design



photography



engraving



etching




batik



exhibits



cartoons



book covers/designs



fabric design



maps



mobiles



fashion design



jewelry



diorama



furniture design



wood carvings



political cartoons



horticultural design




landscaping



terrariums



mosaic



collage



silk screens



movies



videos



computer graphics



aquariums



painting



web pages



package design



postcards



posters




puzzles



car designs



maps



sewing



puppets



set design



tin ware



pottery



iron work



weaving



calligraphy



tessellations



multimedia

presentations




B.

Performance Products




skits



role playing



simulations



theatrical
performance



vocal



athletic events



dance



mime



puppet shows



dramatic
monologues



comic performances



demonstrations



films/videos



reader's theater



poetry readings



improvisations



musical
performance



experiments



interpretive song



composition



chorale



concerts



parades



reenactments



C.

Spoken Products




debates



speeches



radio plays



advertisements



poetry readings



storytelling



poetry for two
voices



interviews



oral histories



newscasts



teaching a lesson



lecture



mock trials



songs



sales promotions



simulations



demonstrations



phone
conversations



eulogies



announcements



comedy routines



master of ceremony



D. J. shows



panel discussions



celebrity roasts



narrations



dedication
ceremony



weather reports



rap songs town crier



guided tours



oral reports



book talks



chronicles



forums



sign language



puppet shows



book reviews



audiotapes



informercials





Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
46




D.

Visual Products




videos



slide/digital photo
shows



sculptures



table settings



advertisements



puppets



calendars



musical scores



book jackets



layouts



models



pottery



proclamations



computer programs



timelines



diagrams/charts



sketches



graphs



collages



ice sculptures



demonstrations



cartoons



travel brochures



athletic skills



blueprints



lists



multimedia
presentations



graphic design



paintings




maps diagrams



mobiles



set design



experiments



caricatures



silk screening



graphic organizer



photography



fashion design



E. Models/Construction Products




drama sets



sculpture



relief map



habitat



bridges



inventions



food



vehicles



fitness trails



microscopes



microscope slides



aqueducts



terrariums



greenhouses



gardens



dioramas



shelters



collections



ceremonies



learning centers



pottery



working models



ant farms



buildings



toys



games



books



solar collectors



bird houses



bulletin boards



circuit boards



paper engineering



puppet theaters



computer programs



computers



documentaries



exhibitions



interviews



scale models



3
-
D figures



graphs



furniture



instruments



robots



machines



rockets



play facilities



quilts



multimedia
presentation



hydroponic farms



masks



robots



gifts



catalogs



mazes


F.

Leadership Products




speeches



plans



school patrols



leading rallies



consensus building



role playing



mock trials



musical
performance



elections



debates



campaigns



protests



open forums



fund raising



student council


/government



organizing a
business



organizing a group



editorials



service

learning projects



editing a newspaper



directing a play



club or class webmaster


G.

Written Products




pamphlets



brochures



books



speeches



parables



advertisements



laws



graphs



grants



analyses



epics



web pages



budgets



blue prints



census reports



folktales

Curriculum


8
th

Grade Science


Page |
47






captions



charts



radio programs



instructions



interview questions



outlines



simulations



recipes



legends



definitions



bibliographies



rhymes



limericks



articles (newspaper,
journal, etc.)



diaries/journals



poetry



marketing plans



comic strips



jokes/riddles



slogans



songs/lyrics



questionnaires



invitations



story boards



greeting cards



autobiographies



flow charts



amendments



family trees



position statements



banners



plays/skits



letters/postcards



crossword puzzles



summaries



consumer reports



lists



notes



graphic organizers



story problems



public service
announcements



ethnography



maps



timelines



multimedia
presentations



discussion group
questions