Scranton School District

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School Name:

Scranton High School





Course:

AP Biology




Grade:

11
th

and 12
th

Grade Elective

Teacher Name:

Margaret Loughney


Teacher email:

marge.loughney@scrsd.org

District Prerequisites:

Biology I Honors and Chemistry I

Textbook:

Biology AP Edition, Seventh Edition: Campbell and Reece

Course Description:

The AP Biology course is designed to meet national academic standards aimed at teaching
high school biology on a collegiate level; while im
proving student’s analytical thinking skills,
problem solving skills and critical thinking.

The main objective of the AP Biology course is to develop a conceptual understanding of
science as a process rather than as an accumulation of facts. To accomplish
the objective,
the course will provide the students with personal experience in scientific inquiry;
recognition of the four big ideas, an understanding of the unifying principles within a diverse
biological world; and the application of biological knowledg
e and critical thinking to
environmental and social concerns.

The cours
e will be structured around the
four big ideas
;

1.

The process of evolution drives the diversity and unity of life.


2.

Biological systems utilize energy and molecular building blocks to grow, reproduce, and
maintain homeostasis.

3.

Living systems retrieve,
transmit, and respond to information essential to life processes.

4.

Biological systems interact and these interactions possess complete properties.


The ongoing information explosion, in the biological sciences, makes the goal of
developing a conceptual fram
ework for modern biology ever challenging but,
immensely important and exciting.
Science is defined as “to know.”

Knowledge of the
biological world is obtained by inquiry. Inquiry and curiosity drive the critical thinking
skills that are inherent in an AP
science course. The acquisition of true knowledge is
Scranton School District

Course Syllabus

CR2

The course
i s structured
around the

enduring
understanding
wi thin the big
i deas as
described in the
AP bi ology
Curri cul um
framework

CR
5

The
course
provi des
student wi th
opportuni ti es
to connect
thei r bi ol ogi cal
and sci enti fi c
knowl edge to
major soci al
i ssues to hel p
them become
sci enti fi cally
l i terate
ci ti zens.


based on the scientific enterprise of asking questions and testing hypothesis. The
laboratory work in AP Biology encourages participation in the scientific process by
allowing students to experience the
excitement of discovery and the satisfaction of
solving problems and connecting concepts.

In addition, students will engage in monthly current event discussions for which they
prepare by readings recent scientific journals, i.e. Scientific American, Discover,

Science or other appropriate science journals
. Through these activi
ties,
biology comes
alive for the students. Journal readings include articles on the following topics:


-

DNA and Cancer Research (Big I
dea 3)

-

Stem Cell Research (Big I
dea 3)

-

Global Warming (Big I
dea 4)

-

Antibiotic Resistance and the Problems with Improper Antibiotic Use
(
Big I
dea 1)

-

Genetically Modified Food (Big I
dea 3)

-

The Use of Genetic Information in the Medical Field

(Big I
dea 3)



In addition, the students will participate in a
field trip to the local University. A research
doctor, at the University, who developed and patented a Cardiovascular Model (CVM),
provides
hands

on opportunity for the AP students to participate in the CVM computerized lab
exercise in his science laborato
ry.


At the end of the course, because of the students’ involvement in the process of science
through the laboratory investigations of biological phenomena, students will have
developed reasoning skills that will enable them to devolve into advanced topic
s in all
other science courses.


The course is fast paced and requires students to be extremely self motivated with
an inherent desire to know and appreciate the biological world around them.


Course Evaluation
:

Instructional Context


The AP Biology course is an elective course for juniors and seniors in high school.
The class meets six times a week for 50 minute periods. One day a week is a double
period to facilitate laboratory work that is essential to the curriculum.



Laboratory wo
rk take up 25% of the instructional time.

The students must have completed a first year honors Biology course and have
completed a Honors or AP Chemistry course or, currently, be enrolled in a Honors
or AP Chemistry course while taking the AP Biology cour
se.




CR4c

The course
provi des student
wi th
opportunities
outside of the
l aboratory
i nvestigation s
to meet the
l earning
objectives within
Bi g Idea 3.

CR5

The course
provi des
student with
opportunities
to connect their
bi ological and
sci entific
knowledge to
major social
i ssues to help
them become
sci entifically
l
i terate ci tizens.


Assessment

Grades are calculated on a percentage basis. Grades are earned
on the basis of the quality and
accuracy of the work completed.

-

Exams and Quizzes



50%



-

Labs and Lab Reports


25%

-

Free Response Questions


10%

-

Homework




10%

-

Class Discussion




5%


Class Rules & Procedures:

Class Rules are very limited and based on one word,
RESPECT
. Respect yourself

by your
behavior
, respect the rights of other students to learn, and respect the support staff.




Units of Instruction

AP Biology Course Syllabus

Approved by the National AP Cen
tral College Board in 2013

Scranton School District

Scranton High School

Margaret Loughney, Room 222

The AP Biology course is designed to meet national academic standards aimed at teaching high school
biology on a collegiate level; while improving student’
s analytical thinking skills, problem solving
skills and critical thinking.


The main objective of the AP Biology course is to develop a conceptual understanding of science as
a process rather than as an accumulation of facts. To accomplish the objective, the course will
provide the students with personal experience in scient
ific inquiry; recognition of the four big
ideas, an understanding of the unifying principles within a diverse biological world; and the
application of biological knowledge and critical thinking to en
vironmental and social concern.





The course will be st
ructured around the
four big ideas
;

1.

The process of evolution drives the diversity and unity of life.


2.

Biological systems utilize energy and molecular building blocks to grow, reproduce,
and maintain homeostasis.

CR
5

The
course
provi des
student wi th
opportuni ti es
to connect
thei r bi ol ogi cal
and sci enti fi c
knowl edge to
major soci al
i ssues to hel p
them become
sci enti fi cally
l i terate
ci ti ze
ns.


CR7
Students
are provided
the
opportunity
to engage in
investigative
laboratory
work
integrated
throughout
the course
for a
minimum of
25 percent of
instructional
time.


3.

Living systems retrieve, transmit, and
respond to information essential to life processes.

4.

Biological systems interact and these interactions possess complete properties.


The ongoing information explosion, in the biological sciences, makes the goal of developing a
conceptual framework for mode
rn biology ever challenging but, immensely important and
exciting.
Science is defined as “to know.”

Knowledge of the biological world is obtained by
inquiry. Inquiry and curiosity drive the critical thinking skills that are inherent in an AP
science course
. The acquisition of true knowledge is based on the scientific enterprise of
asking questions and testing hypothesis. The laboratory work in AP Biology encourages
participation in the scientific process by allowing students to experience the excitement of
discovery and the satisfaction of solving problems and connecting concepts.

In addition, students will engage in monthly current event discussions for which they
prepare by readings recent scientific journals, i.e. Scientific American, Discover,

Science or other appropriate science journals
. Through these activities,
biology
comes
alive for the students. Journal readings include articles on the following topics:


-

DNA and Cancer Research (Big I
dea 3)

-

Stem Cell Research (Big I
dea 3)

-

Global Warming (Big I
dea 4)

-

Antibiotic Resistance and the Problems with Improper Antibiotic Use
(
Big I
dea 1)

-

Genetically Modified Food (Big I
dea 3)

-

The Use of Genetic Information in the Medical Field

(Big I
dea 3)




In addition, the students will participate in a field trip to the local University. A research doctor, at
the Unive
rsity, who developed and patented a Cardiovascular Model (CVM), provides
hands

on
opportunity for the AP students to participate in the CVM computerized lab exercise in his science
laboratory.


At the end of the course, because of the students’ involvemen
t in the process of science
through the laboratory investigations of biological phenomena, students will have developed
reasoning skills that will enable them to devolve into advanced topics in all other science
courses.


The course is fast paced and requi
res students to be extremely self motivated with an
inherent desire to know and appreciate the biological world around them.


Summer Assignment

The summer assignment is critical to the course timetable. Students are required to complete the
Ecology Unit pr
ior to the start of school. The summer assignment is due the first day of the course in
the fall semester.

CR4c

The course
provi des student
wi th
opportunities
outside of the
l aboratory
i nvestigation s
to meet the
l earning
objectives within
Bi g Idea 3.

CR5

The course
provi des
student with
opportunities
to connect their
bi ological and
sci entific
knowledge to
major social
i ssues to help
them become
sci entifically
l i terate ci tize
ns.


In collaboration with the district’s Biology I teachers, the first year Biology students are taught the
Ecology unit, during the fourth quarter. So,
logically, the new AP students, having an introduction to
Ecology at the end of the previous semester, allowing them to build on this earlier learning experience.

The students are given summer packets in May, at a meeting for prospective AP Biology students
held on th
e last Thursday of the month that include:

-

The summary outline and objectives for each Ecology Chapter

-

A Sample Teacher outline for the one Ecology Chapter

-

Free response questions from AP Biology Exams related to the topic of Ecology


The Ecology Unit is U
nit Eight in the textbook; covering Chapters 50 through 55.

The student summer assignment directions are to;

1.

The students are instructed to read the six chapters in the unit from the textbook. In any AP
course a student must commit to reading the chapters
to supplement the teacher’s notes and
lectures. Student DO NOT perform well on the AP tests unless they read the chapters


it is easy to
pick out the students who read from those who believe they can “wing it” and get away without
reading the text when co
nducting classroom discussions.

2.

Students submit a detailed outline. Similar to the sample outline in the packet for chapter 51 on
Ethology or Animal Behavior. The student starting with Chapter 51


reads the chapter and fill in my
outline, as they go. The
n, using the completed Chapter 51 outline as a model for their outline, the
students outline the other ecology chapters themselves. The students are to secure a three ring
notebook and add these chapter outlines to the binder.

3.

Also, in the packet are 12 f
ree response questions from AP exams. Students must answer all 12
questions, following the directions for answering the free response test questions. The answered
questions are them added to binder.

4.

Two weeks after the start of the new school year students

will be given a test on the Ecology Unit.


Instructional Resources


1. Campbell, Neil and Reece, Jane, et al.,
Campbell Biology,

7th Edition, 2005, Pearson


Benjamin Cummings to take home and use as reference and, a second set, to use in the

classroom

2. Giffen, Cynthia and Heitz, Jean.
Practicing Biology
(to accompany Campbell
-
Reece
Biology), 3
rd
Edition, 2008, Pearson
Benjamin Cummings.

<www.campbellbiology.com> (The website to a
ccompany the main text provides
animations, investigations, PowerPoint and other audio
-
visual sources to enhance

instruction)

3. AP Biology Investigative Student Labs Workbooks: an Inquiry Base
d Approach.

4. Web
-
based lab simulations to reinforce ‘wet” labs; the d
istrict has placed the software.

5. AP Biology labs are installed at SHS on the Dell laptop hard drive for class use.

6. Web
-
based lab lectures from Khan Academy and Bozeman Biolog
y

CR1
students
and teachers
use a recentl y
publ i shed
wi thi n the l ast
10 years)
col l ege l evel
bi ol ogy
textbook.


CR3d

Students
connect the
enduring
understand
-
ings

within
Big Idea 4
(biological
systems
interact and
these
systems and
their
interactions
possess
complex
properties)
to at least
one other
big idea.

7. Scientific journals for current research topics available through the District’s Power
Library providing free access to science journals.

8.
www.hhmi.org
. The Howard Hughes Medical Institute: Resources to Teach the New

AP Biology Curri
culum prepared by Ann Brokow

The Investigative Laboratory Component and the Science

The course is structured around inquiry in the lab and the use of the
seven science
practices.

In the formal labs, all seven science practices skills will be used on a reg
ular
basis, as well as, in activities outside the formal lab experience.

1. The student can use representations and m
odels to communicate scientific
phenomena
and solve scientific problems.

a. Create and describe representations and models of natural and
manmade phenomena.

b. Use representations and models
to analyze situations and solve
problems quantitatively and
qualitatively.

2. The student can use mathematics appropriately.

a. Apply mathematical routines to quantities.

b. Estimate numerical
quantities.

3. The student can engage in scientific questioning t
o extend thinking or to guide
investigations within the context of the AP course.

a. Pose, refine, and evaluate scientific questions.

4. The student can plan and implement data collect
ion str
ategies appropriate to
particular scientific
question.

a. Justify the selection of the kind of data used in a particular inquiry

b. Design a plan to collect data to answer a particular inquiry

c. Collect and evaluate date to a particular scientific inquiry
.

5. The student can perform data analysis and evaluation of evidence.

a. Analyze data to identify a particular pattern

b. E
valuate the date sets in relation to a particular scientific inquiry.

6. The student can work with scientific explanations and theor
ies.

A. Justify claims with evidence.

B
. Articulate reasons that scientific theories are refined

C. M
ake predictions about natural phenomena based on scientific models

D
. Evaluate alternate explanations of scientific phenomena.

CR8
The course
provi des
opportuni ti es
for students to
devel op and
record
evi dence of
thei r verbal,
wri tten an
d
graphi c
communi cati on
ski l ls through
l aboratory
reports,
summari es of
l i terature or
sci enti fi c
i nvesti gati on,
and oral,
wri tten, or
graphi c
presentati ons.


7. The student is able to co
nnect and relate know
ledge across various scales,
concepts
and representations in and across domains.

A.
Connect concepts across dom
ains to extrapolate an enduring
understanding of the big
ideas.

Students are given the opportunity to engage in student
-
directed laboratory investigations
throughout the course for a
minimum of 25%

of instructional time.
[CR7]
Students will
conduct inquiry
-
based investigations (two per big idea throughout the course).
[CR6]

The lab experience is used to emphasize that biology is a process that involves development and
testing of hypothesis, collect
ion, analysis, and presentation of data to make a clear discussion of
results. During the course, students will complete th
e
recommended labs in the AP Biology
Investigative Labs: An Inquire
-
Based Approach manual. One class day, out of every four, is devot
ed
to laboratory work. Students are given the labs to read prior to the day of the lab and encouraged
to review the lab on line. They are organized into lab groups of up to four and the lab set up is
discussed the day before to ensure students unders
tand t
he procedures being used.

Students are
required to keep a lab notebook and the Lab reports are completed at home. Web based labs are
available for students who need reinforcement of the lab concepts all AP Biology labs are installed in the
laptop classroom

computers available for student use.

Eduweblabs or pearson.edu labs are all done on
student time












CR7
Students
are provi ded
the opportuni ty
to engage i n
i nvesti gati ve
l aboratory
work
i ntegrated
throughout the
course for a
mi ni mum of 25
percent of
i nstructi onal
ti me.

The topics covered in the labs are:


Investigative Lab 1

Artificial Selection

Investigative Lab 2

Introductory AP Inquiry Lab: Why Don't Whales Have Legs

Investigative Lab 3

Animal Behavior

Investigative Lab4

Transpiration

Investigative Lab 5

Dissolved Oxyge
n and Aquatic Primary Productivity

Investigative Lab 6

Enzyme Catalysis

Investigative Lab 7

Diffusion and Osmosis

Investigative Lab 8

Mitosis and Meiosis

Investigative Lab 9

Photosynthesis and Plant Pigments (Chromatography)

Investigative Lab 10

Respiration

Investigative Lab 11

Biotechnology: Restriction Enzyme Analysis

Investigative Lab 12

Biotechnology: Bacterial Transformation

Investigative Lab 13

Genetics of Organisms fruit Fly Behavior

Investigative Lab 14

Genetics of Organisms: Statistical Analysis Section

Investigative Lab 15

Physiology of the Circulatory System

Investigative Lab 16

The Cardiovascular Model with Computerized Data Analysis

Investigative Lab 17

Mathematical Modeling: Hardy
-
Weinberg

Investigative Lab 18

Comparing DNA Sequences with BLAST



CR7
Students
are
provided
the
opportunity
to engage in
investigativ
e laboratory
work
integrated
throughout
the
course
for a
minimum of
25 percent
of
instructiona
l time.


CR2
The
course is
structured
around the
enduring
understandi
ng within
the big
ideas as
described in
the AP
biology
Curriculum
framework.


Lab Report Format


Unless told otherwise, students use the following format when writing up all lab experiments. This
format will provide the opportunity for students to develop, record, and communicate the results
of their laboratory investigations.
Each lab report co
nsists of five clearly labeled and easily
identified sections written directly into your lab notebook:

I. Introduction/Purpose

II. Methods (Procedure)

III. Data and Observations

-

Present the experimental data and/or observations in ruled data table(s).

IV.
Analysis of Results

-

Calculations with significant figures and units for those figures

-

Graphs that must be descriptive.

-

T
itle and each axis must be labeled with

name of the
variable

and the unit.

-

The controlled or independent variable is on the horizontal

a
xis and the dependent variable
on the vertical axis.

-

Computer generated graphs can be passed into the report.

-

Discuss
ion and analysis of the results.

-

Answers to assigned questions, in the lab workbook (if applicable)

V. Conclusion

-

State your conclusions as clearly as possible. Use specific supporting examples from your
results.

-

Your conclusion should relate directly to the purpose or goals of the experiment.

-

Use your data to support your
conclusions
!!
Always use your data to
substantiate your conclusions!!

VI. Literature Citation

Given that some of the information included

in your lab write up will have
been taken from
a published lab activity, you sh
ould include a citation of the source.

Good on line site for writing labs: ht
tp://www.ncsu.edu/labwrite/


CR8
The
course
provides
opportunities
for students
to develop
and record
evidence of
their verbal,
written and
graphic
communicati
on skills
through
laboratory
reports,
summaries of
literature or
scientific

investigation
and oral,
written, or
graphic
presentat
ion
s






Teaching Strategies


Students are provided with guided Cornell style notes. I have written a total of 50 detailed
outlines that follow the topics in the Campbell’s ninth edition textbook. I provide a copy to
each student to use in class as lecture aids. This allows
students more time to listen and
become engaged in discussion rather than copying notes all through the period. My
classroom lectures are supplements with diagrams, explanations, examples, demonstrations,
visuals, and PowerPoint presentations.


The studen
ts add any information, insights, and/or questions to the margin in the Cornell style
note packets and are encouraged to engage me with their questions. Teacher generated questions
are used as bell ringers to start class and to begin open and encourage cla
ss discussions.

Homework needs to be completed every night. It involves reading assignment, student study
guides, viewing lectures on line (Kahn Academy, Bozeman Biology), and finishing labs. If a formal
assignment is not give, students are expected to use

time to review content for the next day.

Student cooperation in their preparation for class allows for full, active student participation
during class and facilitates more open discussion and small group analysis of information, and less
lecture time.

T
he note packets are kept by the students in a three ringed binder. Students will use this collection
of their work to reflect on the changes they see in the substance and quality of their work over
time. Student self reflection in terms of science skills t
hat were developed over the course of the
school year will help prepare them to move on to college courses and research experience in the
future.




CR8
The
course
provides
opportunities
for students
to develop
and record
evidence of
their verbal,
written and
graphic
communicati
on skills
through
laboratory
reports,
summaries of
literature or
scientific

investigation,
and oral,
written, or
graphic
presenta
tions

Units of Instruction and Course Schedule

The following is the list AP Campbell Chapters
, 7
th

Edition,

c
overed,
in order
, and College Board Correlation.

Chapter

Title

Sections

Essential Knowledge

50

Ecol ogy

1,2,3,4

2.A.1, 2.C.1, 2.D.1, 4.A.6
, 4.B.2

52

Popul ati on Ecol ogy

1,2,3,4,5,6

2.C.2, 2.D.1, 4.B.3, 4.C.3

53

Communi ty Ecol ogy

1,2,3,4,5

2.D.1, 4.A.5,
4.B.4

54

Ecosystems

1,2,3,4

2.A.3, 2.D.1, 4.B.2, 4.C.4

55

Conservati on and Restorati ve
Ecol ogy

1,2,3,4,5

2.D.1, 2.D.3, 4.B.2, 4.B.4,
4.C.4

1

Expl ori ng Li ve

1,2,3

1.A.1,1.A.4, 2.D.2, 3.C.2

51

Ethol ogy/Ani mal Behavi or

1,2,3,4

2.C.2, 2.E.3, 3.E.1

2

Chemi cal Context of Li fe

1,2,3,4

4.A.1, 4.A.2, 4.B.1

3

Water and Fi tness of the
Envi ronment

1,2,3

4.A.1, 4.A.2

4

Carbon and the Mol ecul ar
Di versi ty of Li fe

1,2,3

4.A.1, 4.B.1

5

Structure and Functi on of
Macromol ecul es

1,2,3,4,5

4.A.1, 4.A. 4.C.1,4.B.1

8

I ntroducti on to
Metabol i sm

1,2,3,4,5

2.A.2, 2.C.1, 2.E.2,

4.A.6, 4.B.2

6

Tour of the Cel l

2,3,4,5

2.B.3, 3.A.1, 4.A.2, 4.C.1

7

Cel l Membrane and Functi on

1,2,3,4,5

2.B.1, 2.B.2

9

Cel l ul ar Respi rati on

1,2,3,4,5

2.A.1, 2.A.2

10

Photosynthesi s

1,2,3,4

2.A.2, 2.A.3,

4.A.6
, 4.B.2

11

Cel l communi cati on

1,2,3

2.C.2, 2.E.1, 3.B.2, 3.D.1,
3.D.2, 3.D.3

12

Cel l Cycl e and Mi tosi s

1,2,3

3.A.1, 3.A.2, 4.B.2

CR3d

Students
connect the
enduri ng
understandi ngs
wi thi n Bi g I dea 4
(bi ol ogi cal
systems i nteract
and these
systems and
thei r i nteracti ons
possess compl ex
properti es)
to at
l east one other
bi g i dea.

CR3b
Students
connect the

enduri ng
understandi ngs
wi thi n Bi g I dea 2
(bi ol ogi cal
systems uti l i ze
free energy and
mol ecul ar
bui l di ng bl ocks
to grow, to
reproduce, and
to mai ntai n
dynami c
homeostasi s) to
at l east one
other bi g i dea.


13

Mei osi s

1,2,3,4

3.A.1, 3.A.2, 3.C.1, 3.C.2,
3.D.3

14

Mendel i an Geneti cs

1,2,3,4

3.A.3, 3.A.4, 4.C.2

15

Chromosome Basi s of I nheri tance

1,2,3,4,5

3.A.1, 3.A.2, 3.C.1

16

Mol ecul ar Basi s of I nheri tance:
DNA

1,2

3.A.1, 3.A.2

17

Gene to Protei n

1,2,3,4,5

3.A.1, 3.C.1, 4.A.3

18

Regul ati on of Gene Expressi on

1,2,3,4

3.B.1, 3.B.2, 3.D.4

4.A.4

19

Vi ruses

1,2

3.C.3

20

Bi otechnol ogy

1,2

3.B.1, 3.B.2

21

The Geneti c Basi s of Devel opment

1

4.A.3

40

Basi c Ani mal Form and Functi on

1,2,3,4

2.D.2, 2.E.2, 4.A.4

43

I mmune System

1,2,3,4

2.D.3, 2.D.4, 2.E.1

42

Ci rcul ation

1,2,3,4

2.D.3, 2.E.2

48

Nervous System

1,2,3,4

2.D.3,2.E.1,2.E.2,

3.E.1, 3.E.2

49

Sensory and Motor Mechani sms

1,2,3

2.D.3,2.E.1,2.E.2,

3.E.1, 3.E.2

22

Descent wi th Modi fi cati on: Darwin

1,2,3

1.A.1,1.A.4, 2.D.2, 3.C.2

23

The Evol uti on of Popul ati ons

1,2,3,4

1.A.2, 1.B.1, 1.C.3, 4.C.2

24

Ori gi n of Speci es

1,2,3,4

1.A.3, 1.B.2,1.C.2, 2.E.3, 4.B.3

25

Hi story of the Earth

1,2,3,4

1.C.1, 1.D.1, 1.D.2, 2.D.3

26

Phyl ogeny

1,2,3

1.B.2

39

Pl ant
Responses to Si gnal s

1,2,3,4,5

2.D.3, 2.D.4

CR3c
Students
connect the
enduri ng
understandi ngs
wi thi n Bi g I dea 3
(l i vi ng systems
store, retri eve,
transmi t, and
respond to
i nformati on
essenti al to l i fe
processes) to at
l east one other
bi g i dea.


CR3a
students
connect the
enduri ng
understandi ng
wi thi n Bi g I dea 1
(the process of
evol uti on dri ves
the di versi ty and
uni ty of l i fe) to at
l east one other
bi g i dea.





AP Biology Curriculum Framework



Inquiry and Exploration of Life
,
2 weeks


Topics

Readings

Activities

Assessments


Introduction:

Themes in the
Study of Life


Darwin and the
Theory of
Natural
Selection


Inquiry as a way
to learn science



Chapter 1


Abstract
assignment
from Scientific
American



On line sites;

K
ahn Academy

Hippocampus

Bozeman
Biology


Introductory Film : The Galapagos Islands
and Indigenous Species with varied and
beautiful adaptations to life


AP Lab: Introduction to Inquiry


Whale
Don’t Whales have Legs


www.hhmi.org

Film Natural Selection and
Adaptation


www.hhmi.org

Lecture: Science
Procedures to study Evolution


Natural Selection in Humans:

Interactive On line

www.hhmi.org/biointeractive

/activities/



Tests


Quizzes


Study Guide
Worksheet


Journaling


Homework


Lab Exercises


Campbell CD Rom



CR3
a
s tudents
connect
the
enduri ng
unders tan
di ng
wi thi n Bi g
I dea 1
(the
proces s of
evol uti on
dri ves
the
di vers i ty
and uni ty
of l i fe) to
at l eas t
one other
bi g i dea.

Student Activity: Data collection, analysis,
mathematical analys
is, graphing, and
presentation


varied data, i.e. student
heights


Student Activity: Design an experiment
with an emphasis of testable hypothesis,
variables, procedure, data analysis using
mathematics and graphing



CR4d

The course
provi des student
wi th
opportunities
outside of the
l aboratory
i nvestigation s to
meet the learning
objectives within
Bi g Idea 4



Ecology,
Summer Assignment Review


Topics

Readings

Activities

Assessments


Biomes


Communities and
Ecosystems

Ecological Succession

Symbiotic
Relationships

Competitive exclusio
n


Ethology


Biogeochemical cycles

Population Ecology


Global Issues for
Science Journals on
Acid Rain, Global
Warming,
Introduction
of
Foreign Species,
etc.


Chapters 50
-
55


Journal Readings on
Environmental
Topics


On line sites;

Kahn Academy

Hippocampus

Bozeman Biology


Biome Research:
Students in groups
investigate and
research one
assigned biome and
present their research
to the class


AP Lab 12: Dissolved
oxygen and Aquatic
Primary Productivity


AP Lab 11: Animal
Behavior


Film: National
Geographic
’s Search
for the Great Apes


Panel Discussions and
Debates on
Environmental Topics
i.e. Global Warming,
Acid Precipitation,
Deforestation,
Invasive Species


www.hhmi.org

Lecture
-

Genetic

Tests


Quizzes


Study Guide
Worksheet


Journaling


Homework


Lab Exercises


Campbell CD Rom










Footprint

www.hhmi.org

From
Venoms to Drugs



Independent Work:
Free Response
questions on Ecology
from previous exams


MOLECULES, CELLS AND ENERGY
,

2 weeks


Topics

Readings

Activities

Assessments


Chemistry of Life

Atomic Structure

Chemical Bonding

Functional Groups

Role of Carbon

Macromolecules


Polarity of Water

Water’s Fitness for
life


Metabolism

Free energy Changes

Energy Coupling

Molecules and
reactions involved in
metabolism

Enzymes and their
characteristics



Chapter 2,3,5,and 8



On line sites;

Kahn Academy

Hippocampus

Bozeman Biology


Magneti c model s of
atoms

usi ng a magneti c board
to functi onal ly expl ain
basi c chemi stry


Usi ng ki ts to bui l d
macro
-
mol ecul es


Exerci se on
protei n
fol di ng


software


Aci d, Base, and Buffer
l ab acti vi ty

(teacher generated)


Demonstrati ons on
Water: Densi ty, Surface
Tensi on, Capi l l ary
Acti on, hi gh speci fi c
heat capaci ty


Gi ven speci fi c heat
equati on, i n groups, to
try to come up wi th the
speci
fi c heat of water


Demonstrati on of food
tests for the di fferent
organi c compounds


Tests


Quizzes


Study Guide
Worksheet


Journaling


Homework


Lab Exercises


Campbell CD Rom



CR3b
Students
connect the
enduri ng
understandi n
gs wi thi n Bi g
Idea 2
(bi ol ogi cal
systems
uti l i ze free
energy and
mol ecul ar
bui l di ng
bl ocks to
grow, to
reproduce,
and to
mai ntai n
dynami c
homeostasi s)
to at l east
one other bi g
i dea.


AP Lab Enzyme Catal ysis

and Lab Exerci se
Toothpi ckase Reacti on
Rates Investi gati on


Enzyme Catalysis
Models


Create paper
models to illustrate
enzyme/substrate
specificity, competitive
inhibitors then develop a
hypothesis and design
an experiment to
determine optimum pH
or temperature for an
enzyme



Molecules and
Cells,

4 weeks


Topics

Readings

Activities

Assessments


Cell Biology

Prokaryotic and
eukaryotic cells


architecture and
evolution

Bacteria Cells:
Structure,
Adaptations, and
their Cell Walls

Fluid Mosaic Model of
the Cell Membranes
and transport across
the membrane


Subcellular
Organization


Cell Communication



Cellular Respiration


Mitochondrion
structure and
function


Fermentation


Chapter 6,7,11


On line
sites;

Kahn Academy

Hippocampus

Bozeman Biology


Lab: Compound
Microscope


with Gram staining
techniques



AP Lab 1: Diffusion
and Osmosis


Video on Bacteria and
Bacteria
Communication via
Quorum Sensing with
Professor Bassler


AP Lab 5: Cell
Respiration



AP Lab 6:
Photosynthesis

Lab: Paper
Chromatography
using Leaves


Modeling
Chloroplasts and
Mitochondria


Tests


Quizzes


Study Guide
Worksheet


Journaling


Homework


Lab Exercises


Campbell CD Rom



CR3b
Students
connect the
enduri ng
understandi n
gs wi thi n Bi g
Idea 2
(bi ol ogi cal
systems
uti l i ze free
energy and
mol ecul ar
bui l di ng
bl ocks to
grow, to
reproduce,
and to
mai ntai n
dynami c
homeostasi s)
to at l east

one other bi g
i dea.



Photosynthesis


Structure of
Chloroplasts and
function


Light independent
and light dependent
reaction




C
ell Reproduction and Genetics,

5 weeks


Topics

Readings

Activities

Assessments


Cellular
Reproduction


Cell Cycle

Stages of mitosis

Stages of meiosis

Alternation of
generation

Spermatogenesis

Oogenesis

Chromosome
abnormalities



Chapters 1
4,
15


On line sites;

Kahn Academy

Hippocampus

Bozeman
Biology


AP Lab 3: Mi tosi s and Mei osi s


Mi tosi s on l i ne Tutori al: Acti vi ty
http://www.bi ol ogy.

ari zona.edu/cel l _bi o/tutori als/

cel l _cycl e/

mai n.html


Students will use a chromosome
bead kit to simulate the process of
meiosis and explain when haploidy
occurs

Lab: Embryol ogy of the Sea Urchi n
(teacher generated)



Tests


Quizzes


Study Guide
Worksheet


Journaling


Homework

Lab Exercises


CR3c
Students
connect the
enduri ng
understandi
ngs wi thi n
Bi g Idea 3
(l i vi ng
systems
store,
retri eve,
transmi t,
and respond
t
o
i nformati on
essenti al to
l i fe
processes)
to at l east
one other
bi g i dea.


Mendelian
Genetics

Inheritance
patterns:
monohybrid,
dihybrid, sex
linked, co
dominance, lethal,
polygenic
inheritanc
e


Non
-
Mendeliam
Genetics

Genetic Diseases

Cancer


on l i ne i nteracti ve acti vi ty

www.i nsi de cancer.org


AP Lab 7: Geneti cs Drosophi l a

Crosses
Students will be given data
from a Genetics of Drosophila
laboratory involving three crosses of
the fruit flies. All of the observations
will be given to them. They will
develop a null hypothesis as to the
mode of inheritance based on the
data, an
d they will use the Chi
Square statistical analysis to
determine whether to accept or reject
the hypothesis


Karyotyping Activity on line


www.biology.arizona.edu

and

Make a Karyotype at
www.learn.genetics.utah.edu/


www.hhmi.org

Natural selection to Lac
tose

Intolerance: A n Interactive study
of Mutations


Campbell CD Rom



3.
Molecular Biology
, 5 weeks


Topics

Readings

Activities

Assessments


Molecular
Genetics

DNA

Replication

Transcription

RNA

Translation

Gene regulation

Mutations

Nucleic Acid
technology and its
applications

Viral Structure


Control of Gene
Expression :
the lac
operon



Chapter 16,
17


On line sites;

Kahn
Academy

Hippocampus

Bozeman
Biology


AP Lab 6:
Molecular Biology

Bacterial Transformation

Students will perform a transformation
experiment in which they transform a
bacterial cell to contain a plasmid
containing a gene which can be
expressed so as to produce protein
products which make the cell “glow”.
Students will then study the structure of

the plasmid and make predictions
regarding growth on various agar plates
(LB plates, plates with ampicillin and
arabinose added). They will then
examine the bacterial growth afterwards
and collect quantitative data. They will
calculate transformation effi
ciency.

Gel Electrophoresis


DNA to Protein: Interactive on line
activity www.learn.genetics.utah.edu/


Eukaryotic Gene Expression:

Tutorial on Lac Operon

http://www.biology.arizona.

edu/molecular_bio/

Model of an operon: Following lecture
and discussion
of structure and function
of an operon system, students will create
a model of an operon and demonstrate to
their classmates.


www.hhmi.org. Lecture and Video:
Regulation of Eukaryotic DNA
Transcription


Tests


Quizzes


Study Guide
Worksheet


Journaling


Homework

Lab Exercises


Campbell CD Rom



CR3b
Students
connect the
enduring
understandi
ngs within
Big Idea 2
(biological
systems
utilize free
energy and
molecular
building
blocks to
grow, to
reproduce,
and to
maintain
dynamic
homeostasis
) to at least
one other
big idea


www.hhmi.org

Gene Switches and
Wing Morphs Animatio
n




Spring Semester


Structure and Function of Animals,

10 weeks

Topics

Readings

Activities

Assessments


Comparative Anatomy
and Physiology


Basi c anatomy wi th
emphasi s on
mammal i an systems


Excretory system


wi th homeostasi s

/osmoregul ati on

Endocri ne System

Homeostasi s, sugar

And cal ci um control

Reproducti ve System
wi th sex cycl es

Immune System

Ci rcul atory System

Nervous System

Brai n

C

Chapter 40, 42,
43, 44,48, 49


On l i ne si tes;

Kahn Academy

Hi ppocampus

Bozeman Bi ol ogy


Lab: Spi rometers used to


measure ti dal vol ume, resi dual
vol ume and vi tal capacity then
compare these val ues for

athl etes vs. non athl etes


ELISA Lab: on l i ne:
http://www.hhmi
.org/i nteraci tve/l abs


AP Lab 10: Physi ol ogy of the
Ci rcul atory

System


Fi el d Tri p: The Uni versi ty of Scranton:
Dr. Terrance Sweeney’s
Cardi ovascular Model at the
Uni versi ty


Graphi ng Acti vi ty for Reproducti ve
Cycl es


www.hhmi.org

Ani mati on

Creati ng Embryoni c Stem Cel l s


Fi el d Tri p: Uni versi ty

Research Professor’s Cardi ovascular

Tests


Qui zzes


Study Gui de
Worksheet


Journal i ng


Homework


Lab Exerci ses


Campbel l CD Rom



CR3c
Students
connect
the
enduri ng
understan
di ngs
wi thi n Bi g
Idea 3
(l i vi ng
systems
store,
retri eve,
transmi t,
and
respond
to
i nformati
on
essenti al
to l i fe
processes
) to at
l east one
other bi g
i dea

Model of Ci rcul ati on wi th

Computeri zed Anal ysi s

of Bl ood Pressure and Bl ood Ci rcui ts


Lab: Sheep Brai n Di ssecti on and Cow’s
Eye wi th on l i ne fol l ow as you di ssect
brai n si te


http://academi c.scranton.

edu/department/ps
ych/sheep/



www.hhmi.org

Ani mati ons


Cel l s i n the Immune
System and Anti gen Presentati on

AIDS and the HIV Li fe Cycl e

Ani mati on


El ectri cal Acti vi ty i n
Neurons and Mol ecul ar Acti vi ty of
Short and Long Term Memory

Lecture: Bui l d Brai ns

Lab: The Neurophysi
ol ogy Lab




Evolution,

5 weeks


Topics

Readings

Activities

Assessments


Evolution of Earth


Evolution of Early Life

Natural Sel ecti on and
Arti fi ci al
Sel ecti on

Evi dence for Evol uti on

Mechani sm of Evol uti on

Evol uti onary patterns


Phylogenic
classification

Evol uti onary
Rel ati onshi ps

Speci ati on i ncl uding
al l opatric and sympatri c
speci ati on


Gradual i sm vs.
punctuated equi l i brium


Chapters


On l i ne si tes;

Kahn Academy

Hi ppocampus

Bozeman Bi ol ogy


AP Lab 8: Popul ati on
geneti cs and evol uti on


Lab: Nucl ei c Aci d
sequences used to
compare nucl ei c aci d
sequences of di fferent
ani mal s


www.hhmi,org

Al l el e and Phenotype
Frequency


Acti vi ty; Arti fi ci al
Sel ecti on of D
og Breeds
usi ng pi ctures of the
students own pet dogs
and devel opi ng
hypothesi s for the
structural adaptati ons
of the di fferent breeds.


Vi deo on Darwi n’s
Fi nches fol l owed by an
Acti vi ty

Lab: Students
desi gn, conduct, and
wri te up and
experi ment on beak
ad
aptati ons and fi tnes s
us i ng forceps as beaks
to pi ck up vari ous nuts,

Tes ts


Qui zzes


Study Gui de Works heet


Journal i ng


Homework


Lab Exerci s es


Campbel l CD Rom



CR3
a

s tudents
connect the
enduri ng
unders tandi ng
wi thi n Bi g
I dea 1 (the
proces s of
evol uti on
dri ves the
di vers i ty and
uni ty of l i fe)
to at l eas t one
other bi g i dea.

beans, and corn kernel s


Student Acti vi ty:
Constructi on and
Anal ysi s of Phyl ogeni c
Trees


www.hhmi.org

From
Venoms to Drugs



Bacteria and Arachea,
2 weeks

Topics

Readings

Activities

Assessments

The Geneti cs of Vi ruses and
Bacteri a

Vi ral Cycl es

Bacteri al Reproducti on

Gene Regul ati on for
Bacteri al Response to
Envi ronment

Chapter 18 and 19

www.hhmi.org

Ani mati ns:
Bacteri al Conjugati on and
Recombi nati on of Vi ral
Genes

Lecture: Mi crobe Hunters

Lecture: Emergi ng
Infecti ons

Tests


Qui zzes


Study Gui de Worksheet


Journal i ng


Homework


Lab Exerci ses


Campbel l CD Rom





Structure and Function of
Plants
,
2

weeks


Topics

Readings

Activities

Assessments

Angi osperm Structure,
Growth, and
Devel opment of Pl ants


Hormonal Pl ants

AP Bi ol ogy Lab 4: Pl ant
Pi gments


Lab 9: transpi rati on with
the observati on of seed
Tests


Qui zzes


CR3c
Students
connect the
enduri ng
understandi ng
s wi thi n Bi g
Idea 3 (l i vi ng
systems store,
retri eve,
transmi t, and
respond to
i nformati on
essenti al to
l i fe processes)
to at l east one
other bi g i dea.

responses

germi nati on


Teacher demonstrati on
on fl oral anatomy wi th
regard to pl ant
reproducti on


Mi cro Lab: Monocot
and Di cot Acti vi ty
sketchi ng root and stem
structures from
mi croscope sl i des

Study Gui de Worksheet


Journal i ng


Homework


Lab Exerci ses


Campbel l CD Rom