Scoping Comment Suggestions

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22 Φεβ 2014 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 7 μήνες)

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Scoping Comment
Suggestions



F
ederal Energy Regulatory Commission

(FERC)
is accepting public comment during
an
initial
“scoping” phase, which is the beginning of the analysis for
building a gas pipeline and
terminal
. You do not need to be an expert to
provide comments. To the contrary, scoping is
when you tell FERC what concern
s

you and what you want
their

experts to analyze.


Feel free to use the following as guidelines in preparing your comments for FERC.


1.
LNG export is not in America’s best inter
est

-

According to a recent study by the Energy Information Administration, the approval
of
gas
exports across the country could result in an immediate increase of natural
gas rates of 54%, impacting both residential and industrial ratepayers. How can
FERC e
nsure that L
iquid
N
atural
G
as (LNG)

exports will not increase gas prices for
Americans?

-

Cheap and abundant supplies of natural gas provide manufacturers and industrial
suppliers with the affordable energy they need to produce jobs and help rebuild our
nati
onal economy. We should not export our competitive economic advantage. How
can FERC ensure that
gas

exports will not further harm our weak economy?

-

Exporting
natural gas
will place a higher demand on the producers of domestic
natural gas. Some of the suppl
ies for this project would come from hydraulic
fracking, a highly controversial form of extraction with unknown public health and
environmental impacts. What are the environmental and economic impacts of
increased fracking in the U.S. to meet the demand of

a LNG export terminal in Coos
Bay?


2.
The proposed route would negatively impact landowners throughout Oregon

-

The energy company (
Pacific Connector
)

has not

provided

route details and land
acquisition processes w
hile
threatening

the use of eminent domain

to take
Oregonian’s private land
. FERC

has
state
d

that if the pipeline is approved, eminent
domain will be used.
E
minent domain is
not
appropriate for a private project that is
not in the public interest. How does FERC consider L
NG export to have a public
benefit that allows the legal use of eminent domain?

-

The Pacific Connector pipeline would severely disrupt land
-
based businesses along
the route, including foresters and ranchers, by limiting property owners’ access to
their own
acreage and restricting activities on their land, such as the use of heavy
equipment

around a potentially dangerous gas pipeline
. How does FERC calculate
this loss of
access and use of
private property
?

-

The proposed pipeline
could
disrupt water tables and
wells, negatively impacting
landowners’ water supplies. In addition, the pipeline route would require the
removal of trees and shrubs on steep terrain adjacent to nearby homes. This
disruption to the landscape would cause threatening erosion and landslides

near
occupied homes. How can FERC ensure that the pipeline will not cause severe
erosion and landslides in a very mountainous and steep region? How can FERC
ensure that wells and water supplies will not be harmed? How can FERC ensure that
water supplies w
ill not be harmed in communities where the “fracked” gas is being
sourced in order to export from Coos Bay?


3.
The projec
t is a threat to public safety. The proposed terminal and pipeline puts
southern Oregon communities at an unacceptable risk

-

The Depart
ment of Homeland Security has listed LNG terminals as a top potential
terrorist target. The proposed Jordan Cove LNG terminal site is located directly
across the bay inlet from an airport. This is an inappropriate security risk to the
populated Coos Bay re
gion. How can FERC ensure the safety of the Coos Bay region
from
the threats

associated with a LNG terminal?

-

The Jordan Cove LNG terminal would be built atop dredge spoils in a tsunami
seduction zone in a region expecting earthquakes. This is an unacceptab
le risk to
Coos Bay communities. How can FERC ensure that the terminal would not be
impacted by an earthquake or tsunami?

-

The lack of odorization in the pipeline increases the likelihood that leaks will go
undetected and result in ignition and fire.


The t
hermal hazard area for a pipeline
this size exceeds 800 feet and many homes are within this range according to the
current proposed route. How can FERC ensure community safety from a 36
-
inch
non
-
odorized gas pipeline?

-

Rural counties and small towns along t
his route do not have adequate emergency
response and firefighting resources to accommodate this project.


FERC must
consider these issues as part of the EIS
-

and specifically outline how these resource
gaps will be mitigated.


It is inappropriate to defe
r this issue.


4. The project will have significant, negative environmental impacts that cannot
be mitigated

-

The proposed pipeline route would cross over 350 waterbodies, including major
rivers
such as the Rogue and the south Umpqua
and sensitive streams. Pipeline
construction would threaten
to deliver
sediment and
cause
erosion in delicate
aquatic
ecosystems, often in salmon
-
bearing
streams
. How can FERC ensure that
this project does not further degrade water quality? How can FERC en
sure that this
project will not further harm species that are listed on the Endangered Species Act,
including
our iconic Pacific C
oho salmon?

-

The
gas
terminal
(Jordon Cove)
would require the largest dredging project in the
history of the state of Oregon, t
hreatening sensitive habitat and species, including
oysters.
How can FERC ensure there will be no impacts to the ecology of Coos Bay
and adjacent estuary habitats?

-

The pipeline will damage wildlife habitat, including habitat for the marbled
murrelet,
north
ern spotted

owl and other wildlife species.

-

The
95
-
foot wide temporary right
-
of
-
way will degrade soil quality, fragment wildlife
habitat, and increase erosion and sedimentation in key watersheds for the recovery
of salmon.

-

The project will conflict with re
creational uses of public lands on the Rogue River
-
Siskiyou, Umpqua and Fremont
-
Winema National Forests and the Medford,
Roseburg and Coos Bay Districts of the Bureau of Land Management. For instance,
the pipeline crosses the Pacific Crest Trail. The
95
-
f
oot wide linear clearcut imposed
by Pacific Connector will disrupt recreational enjoyment of these areas and
permanently degrade the recreational values of these public lands.
How can FERC
eliminate the impacts to water quality, endangered species and recr
eation?