NEURAL NETWORKS AND FUZZY SYSTEMS

clangedbivalveΤεχνίτη Νοημοσύνη και Ρομποτική

19 Οκτ 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 7 μήνες)

67 εμφανίσεις

1.Neuronal Dynamical Systems

We describe the neuronal dynamical systems by first
-
order differential or difference equations that govern
the time evolution of the neuronal activations or
membrane potentials.

Review

4.Additive activation models

Hopfield circuit:

1.
Additive autoassociative model;

2.
Strictly increasing bounded signal function ;

3.
Synaptic connection matrix is symmetric .

Review

5.Additive bivalent models

Lyapunov Functions

Cannot find a lyapunov function,nothing follows;

Can find a lyapunov function,stability holds.

Review

A dynamics system is


stable , if ;


asymptotically stable, if .

Monotonicity of a lyapunov function is a sufficient
not necessary condition for stability and asymptotic
stability.

Review

Bivalent BAM theorem
.


Every matrix is bidirectionally stable for synchronous or
asynchronous state changes.


Synchronous:update an entire field of neurons at a time.


Simple asynchronous:only one neuron makes a state
-
change decision.


Subset asynchronous:one subset of neurons per field
makes state
-
change decisions at a time.

Review

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models

The most popular method for constructing M:the
bipolar
Hebbian

or
outer
-
product

learning method

binary vector associations:

bipolar vector associations:

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models

The
bipolar outer
-
product law
:

The
binary outer
-
product law
:

The
Boolean outer
-
product law
:

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models

The
weighted outer
-
product law
:

In matrix notation:

Where holds.

Where

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models

One can models the inherent exponential fading of
unsupervised learning laws by rearrange coefficients of the
matrix W. Such as ,

an exponential fading memory, constrained by ,
results if

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models

1.Unweighted encoding skews memory
-
capacity analyses.

2. The neural
-
network literature has largely overlooked
the weighted outerproduct laws.



Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models



Optimal Linear Associative Memory Matrices

Optimal linear associative memory matrices:

The pseudo
-
inverse matrix of

:

If x is a nonzero scalar:

If x is a zero scalar or zero vector :

For a rectangular matrix
,
if


exists:

If x is a nonzero vector:

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models



Optimal Linear Associative Memory Matrices

Define the
matrix Euclidean norm

as

Minimize the mean
-
squared error of forward
recall,to find that satisfies the relation

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models

Suppose further that the inverse matrix exists.
Then

So the OLAM matrix correspond to



Optimal Linear Associative Memory Matrices

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models

If the set of vector is orthonormal

Then the OLAM matrix reduces to the classical
linear
associative memory
(LAM) :

For is orthonormal, the inverse of is .

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models



Autoassociative OLAM Filtering

Autoassociative OLAM systems behave as linear filters.

In the autoassociative case the OLAM matrix encodes only
the known signal vectors . Then the OLAM matrix
equation (3
-
78) reduces to

M

linearly

filters


input measurement x to the output
vector by vector matrix multiplication: .

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


3.6.2 Autoassociative OLAM Filtering

The OLAM matrix behaves as a projection
operator. Algebraically,this means the matrix
M

is
idempotent
: .


Since matrix multiplication is associative,pseudo
-
inverse property (3
-
80) implies idempotency of the
autoassociative OLAM matrix

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models



Autoassociative OLAM Filtering

Then (3
-
80) also implies that the additive dual matrix


behaves as a projection operator:

We can represent a projection matrix
M

as the
mapping

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models



Autoassociative OLAM Filtering

The Pythagorean theorem underlies projection
operators.

The known signal vectors span
some unique linear subspace of

L

equals , the set of all
linear combinations of the m known signal vectors.


denotes the
orthogonal complement

space

the set of all real n
-
vectors x orthogonal to every
n
-
vector y in L.

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models



Autoassociative OLAM Filtering

1.
Operator projects onto L.

2.
The dual operator projects onto .

Projection Operator and uniquely
decompose every vector x into a summed
signal

vector and a noise or

novelty

vector :

x

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models



Autoassociative OLAM Filtering

The unique additive decomposition obeys a
generalized Pythagorean theorem:

where defines the squared
Euclidean or norm.

Kohonen[1988] calls the novelty filter on .

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models



Autoassociative OLAM Filtering

Projection measures what we know about input x
relative to stored signal vectors :

for some constant vector .

The novelty vector measures what is maximally
unknown or novel in the measured input signal x.

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


Autoassociative OLAM Filtering

Suppose we model a random measurement vector x as
a random signal vector corrupted by an additive,
independent random
-
noise vector :

We can estimate the unknown signal as the OLAM
-
filtered output .

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


Autoassociative OLAM Filtering

Kohonen[1988] has shown that if the multivariable noise
distribution is radially symmetric, such as a multivariable
Gaussian distribution,then the OLAM capacity
m

and
pattern dimension
n

scale the variance of the random
-
variable estimator
-
error norm :

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


Autoassociative OLAM Filtering

1.The autoassociative OLAM filter suppress noise if m
<n

,
when memory capacity does not exceed signal dimension.

2.The OLAM filter amplifies noise if m
>n
, when capacity
exceeds dimension.

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


BAM Correlation Encoding Example

The above data
-
dependent encoding schemes add
outer
-
product correlation matrices.

The following example illustrates a complete nonlinear
feedback neural network in action,with data deliberately
encoded into the system dynamics.

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


BAM Correlation Encoding Example

Suppose the data consists of two unweighted
binary associations and defined by the
nonorthogonal binary signal vectors:

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


BAM Correlation Encoding Example

These binary associations correspond to the two bipolar
associations and defined by the bipol

ar signal vectors:

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


BAM Correlation Encoding Example

We compute the BAM memory matrix M by adding the bipol

ar correlation matrices and pointwise. The first
correlation matrix equals

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


BAM Correlation Encoding Example

Observe that the
i
th row of the correlation matrix
equals the bipolar vector multipled by the
i

th element
of . The
j

th column has the similar result. So
equals

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


BAM Correlation Encoding Example

Adding these matrices pairwise gives M:

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


BAM Correlation Encoding Example

Suppose, first,we use binary state vectors.All update policies
are synchronous.Suppose we present binary vector as
input to the system

as the current signal state vector at .
Then applying the threshold law (3
-
26) synchronously gives

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


BAM Correlation Encoding Example

Passing through the backward filter , and applying
the bipolar version of the threshold law(3
-
27),gives back :

So is a fixed point of the BAM dynamical system.
It has Lyapunov

energy


,
which equals the backward value .


has the similar result:a fixed point with
energy .

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


BAM Correlation Encoding Example

So the two deliberately encoded fixed points reside in
equally

deep


attractors
.

Hamming distance H equals distance. counts the
number of slots in which binary vectors and differ:

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


BAM Correlation Encoding Example

Consider for example the input ,
which differs from by 1 bit , or . Then

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


BAM Correlation Encoding Example


On average, bipolar signal state vector produce more
accurate recall than binary signal state vectors when we
use bipolar out
-
product encoding.


Intuitively,binary signal implicitly favor 1s over 0s,wheres
bipolarsignals are not biased in favor of 1s or

1s:


1+0=1,whereas 1+(
-
1)=0

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


BAM Correlation Encoding Example


The nueron do not know that a globle pattern

error


has
occurred. They do not know that they should correct the
error, or whether their current behavior helps correct it.The
network also does not provide the nuerons with a globle
error signal, and also Lyapunov

energy


information,
though state
-
changing nuerons decrease the energy.


Insteadly,
the system dynamics
guide the local behavior

to a globle reconstruction(recollection) of a learned pattern
.


Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


Memory Capacity:Dimensionality Limits Capacity

Synaptic connection matrices encode limited
information.


After a point,adding additional associations

Does not significantly change the connection
matrix. The system

forgets

some patterns.
This limits the
memory capacity
.

We sum more correlation matrices ,then
holds more frequently.

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


Memory Capacity:Dimensionality Limits Capacity

Synaptic connection matrices encode limited
information.


After a point,adding additional associations

Does not significantly change the connection
matrix. The system

forgets

some patterns.
This limits the
memory capacity
.

We sum more correlation matrices ,then
holds more frequently.

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


Memory Capacity:Dimensionality Limits Capacity

A general property of nueral network:


Dimensionality limits capacity

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


3.6.4 Memory Capacity:Dimensionality Limits Capacity

Grossberg

s
sparse coding theorem

says ,
for
deterministic encoding ,
that

pattern dimensionality must
exceed pattern number to prevent learning some patterns at
the expense of forgetting others
.

For example,capacity bound for bipolar correlation encoding
in the Amari
-
Hopfield network is

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


3.6.4 Memory Capacity:Dimensionality Limits Capacity


For Boolean encoding of binary associations, the memory
capacity of bivalent additive BAMs can greatly exceed min(n,p)
to the new upper bound min(2
n
,2
p
), if the thresholds U
i
and V
j

are judiciously choosed.


And different sets of thresholds should also improve capacity
in the bipolar case(incloding bipolar Hebbian encoding)

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


The Hopfield Model

The Hopfield model illustrates an autoassociative additive
bivalent BAM operated serially with simple asynchronous
state changes.

Autoassociativity means the network topology reduces to only
one field, ,of neurons: .The synaptic connection
matrix M symmetrically
intra
connects the n neurons in field

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


The Hopfield Model

The autoassociative version of Equation (3
-
24) describes
the additive neuronal activation dynamics:

(3
-
87)

for constant input , with threshold signal function


(3
-
88)

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


The Hopfield Model

We precompute the Hebbian synaptic connection matrix M
by summing bipolar outer
-
product(autocorrelation)matrices
and zeroing the main diagonal:

(3
-
89)

where I denotes the n
-
by
-
n identity matrix .

Zeroing the main diagonal tends to improve recall accuracy
by helping the system transfer function behave less
like the identity operator.

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


Additive dynamics and the noise
-
saturation dilemma

Grossberg

s Saturation theorem states that additive
activation models saturate for large inputs, but
multiplicative models do not .

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models

The stationary

reflectance pattern


confronts the system amid the background illumination

The
i
th neuron receives input .Convex coefficient
defines the

reflectance


:

: the passive decay rate

: the activation bound

Grossberg

s Saturation Theorem

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models

Additive Grossberg model:

We can solve the linear differential equation to yield

For initial condition , as time increases the
activation converges to its steady
-
state value:

As

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models

Multiplicative activation model:

So the additive model saturates.

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models

For initial condition ,the solution to this
differential equation becomes

As time increases, the neuron reaches steady state
exponentially fast:

as .

(3
-
96)

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models

This proves the Grossberg saturation theorem:


Additive models saturate ,

multiplicative models do not.

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models

In general the activation variable can assume negative
values . Then the operating range equals
for .In the neurobiological literature the lower
bound is usually smaller in magnitude than the upper
bound :

This leads to the slightly more general shunting
activation model:

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models



General Neuronal Activations:Cohen
-
Grossberg and
multiplicative models

Consider the symmetric unidirectional or autoassociative
case when , , and M is constant . Then a
neural network possesses Cohen
-
Grossberg[1983] activation
dynamics if its activation equations have the form

The nonnegative function represents an abstract
amplification function
.

(3
-
102)

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models



General Neuronal Activations:Cohen
-
Grossberg and
multiplicative models

1. An intensity range of many order of magnitude is
compressed into a manageable excursion in signal level.

2. The voltage difference between two points is
propoetional to the contrast ratio between the two
corresponding points in the image, independent of
incident light intensity.

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models



General Neuronal Activations:Cohen
-
Grossberg and
multiplicative models

1. Grossberg

s interpretation of signal and noise

3. Grossberg

s noise suppression.

2. Grossberg

s interpretation of noise as auniform
distribution.

Shortcoming of Grossberg

s model:

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models

Grossberg[1988]has also shown that (3
-
102) reduces to the
additive brain
-
state
-
in
-
a
-
box model of Anderson[1977,1983]
and the shunting masking
-
field model [Cohen,1987] upon
appropriate change of variables.

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models

If , , and
constant , where and are
positive constants , and input is constant or varies slowly
relative to fluctuations in ,then (3
-
102) reduces to the
Hopfield circuit[1984]:

An autoassociative network has
shunting

or
multiplicative

activation dynamics when the amplification function is linear,
and is nonlinear .

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models

For instance , if , (self
-
excitation in lateral
inhibition) , and

then (3
-
104) describes the distance
-
dependent
unidirectional shunting network :

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models

Hodgkin
-
Huxley membrane equation:


, and denote respectively passive(chloride ) ,
excitatory (sodium ) , and inhibitory (potassium )
saturation upper bounds .

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models

At equilibrium, when the current equals zero ,the Hodgkin
-
Huxley model has the
resting potential

:

Neglect chloride
-
based passive terms.This gives the
resting potential of the shunting model as

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models

BAM activations also possess Cohen
-
Grossberg dynamics,
and their extensions:

with corresponding Lyapunov function L , as we show in

Chapter 6 :

Chapter 3. Neural Dynamics II:Activation Models


1. The synaptic connections of all models till
now have not changeed with time.


2. Such system only recall stored patterns.


3. They do not simultaneously learn new ones.

Any Comments