Cristina Caramelo Gomes, professor and architect, Lisbon, Portugal.

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1 Δεκ 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 6 μήνες)

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TWELVE LECTURES ON ARCHITECTURE, SOME REVIEWS.



I have been reading
this

book carefully and it sound
s

amazing
for

the strength of
its

statements and the depth of
its

rationale.

It
makes me think!
T
his book is
intended
for
students, yet

I
think i
t should b
e
read by everyone who is interested in

or works with
the
built environment.
Those

who teach urban planning do it for their
own ego
,

not for people who
are

supposed to live there. The result is an
architectural object for imaginary people.

O
rnament is m
uch

more than a simple
aesthetic effect
. The ornament in our houses is the way
of

express
ing

our emotions
and personality within the space that we need to mark as ours (like an
y
other
animal) and this can be fundamental for hum
an psychological stability. C
ut
t
ing

the
ornament from the built environment is similar to neglect
ing

the human
experiences

of the place. The idea of home

is a concept that all of us try to find
in
every place that we live in, not only in dwelling,

and

it

is always based on personal
past
experiences.

This

book is very critical of the Modernist Movement,
and
reminds
me
of
the importance of building
for

people and not for a show room.
W
e really need
a built environm
ent that motivates calm and pea
ce in

our behavior and promotes
interactions
w
ith
the environment and with other people
.



Cristina Caramelo
Gomes, professor and architect, Lisbon, Portugal.



I rea
lly like the style of this book;

it

s just like reading a

professor

s notebook

.
F
or the most part the book is a crafted compilation
of notes and concepts cutting
i
nto the meat of the argument, ye
t it is so

lean

. The next generation of architects
should understand these enumerated wrongs of modernism
, so as

to confront a new
architectural future aligned with the human

as center. A r
ea
d
er

get
s

a clear insight
into the territory of new codes, requirements
,

and valuation for building. Salingaros
is s
cientific, cognitive
,

and sharply critical of the contemporary solutions,
and he
breaks down complex issues so that we, architects, can impro
ve our understanding
and ability to design for people.




Frederick Grier, architecture student, Chicago.



“Salingaros is a charismatic teacher. In my opinion this is a fascinating and very
important publication.
The author presents mathematical concepts
and computer
technologies: fractals, cellular automata, genetic algorithms. He shows
us
the beauty
of mathematics through its usage. Demonstrating practical usage will demystify
these seemingly inaccessible concepts and,
consequently
, the area of knowledge

that

seems to be the horror of school le
avers taking their finals. The a
uthor chooses
interesting, spectacular mathematical problems which can be illustrated with
“pretty” and elegant drawings


he knows that 80% of information reaches us
through the sens
e of sight. Drawn manually, with a sensitive line, the drawings
illustrate the text well. The rich bibliography referred to allows individual
exploration of the topics mentioned. One of the source names i
s that of Christopher
Alexander; I share the a
uthor’
s fascination with his ideas. Salingaros, presenting his
own views


sometimes controversial


provokes the r
eader, thus encouraging
discussion.

Formulating his message through a broad spectrum of topics, Salingaros
appears to be a true Renaissance figure.




Jadwiga Zarnowiecka, professor and
architect, Bialystok, Poland.



“While Salingaros’ exposition isn’t a design manual with explicit answers, it does let
you think of the problem with the right frame of mind. It’s so nice to see that
structures which h
ave a scaling distribution are more structurally sound AND more
beautiful than those that don’t. If natural objects didn’t have that scaling
distribution, they would have collapsed a long time ago. ‘Ornament becomes
substance’


this made my jaw drop. The
analogy with the binding energy of
subatomic particles is fantastic. This is really great material. I love the drawing of
the memory bank infected with ‘cubes’. You can’t just up
-
scale things; you need to
make them good for their size (as is clearly shown
in these lectures). It is very hard
to debunk something in your mind when all your life you have read big expensive
art/architecture books describing those places as the jewels of the century. These
days it takes major effort to attune yourself to your sen
ses and intuitions. Only
children say ‘this house is really cool’ after just a few minutes of being inside.”


Federico Mena Quintero, software architect, Xalapa, Mexico.