CCNA 1 Module 11 TCP/IP Transport and Application Layers

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26 Οκτ 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 8 μήνες)

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CCNA 2 v3.1 Module 10

Intermediate TCP
/IP

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Purpose of This PowerPoint


This PowerPoint primarily consists of the Target
Indicators (TIs) of this module in CCNA version
3.1.


It was created to give instructors a PowerPoint to
take and modify as their own.


This PowerPoint is:

NOT a study guide for the module final assessment.

NOT a study guide for the CCNA certification exam.


Please report any mistakes you find in this
PowerPoint by using the Academy Connection
Help link.

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To Locate Instructional Resource
Materials on Academy Connection:


Go to the Community FTP Center to locate
materials created by the instructor community


Go to the Tools section


Go to the Alpha Preview section


Go to the Community link under Resources


See the resources available on the Class home
page for classes you are offering


Search
http://www.cisco.com



Contact your parent academy!

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Objectives

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TCP Operation

The transport layer is responsible for the
reliable transport of and regulation of data
flow from source to destination.

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Synchronization or Three
-
Way
Handshake

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Denial
-
of
-
Service Attacks

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Simple Windowing

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TCP Sequence and Acknowledgment
Numbers

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Positive ACK


Acknowledgement is a common step in
the synchronization process which
includes sliding windows and data
sequencing.

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Protocol Graph: TCP/IP

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UDP Segment Format

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Port Numbers

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Telnet Port Numbers

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Reserved TCP and UDP Port Numbers

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Ports for Clients


Whenever a client connects to a service
on a server, a source and destination port
must be specified.


TCP and UDP segments contain fields for
source and destination ports.

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Port Numbering and Well
-
Known Port
Numbers


Port numbers are divided into three
different categories:

well
-
known ports

registered ports

dynamic or private ports

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Port Numbers and Socket

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Comparison of MAC addresses, IP
addresses, and port numbers


A good analogy can be made with a
normal letter.


The name on the envelope would be
equivalent to a port number, the street
address is the MAC, and the city and state
is the IP address.

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Summary