riddor 2013

bulgefetaΠολεοδομικά Έργα

29 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 11 μήνες)

244 εμφανίσεις

RIDDOR 2013

(Draft guidance for review)

Sections


1.

Accident Reporting Requirements


Key Points & Exemptions

2.

Who is the responsible person?

3.

Types of Reportable incidents

4.

When do I need to make a report?

5.

Ways to submit a RIDDOR report

6.

Specified Injuries to W
orkers

7.

Occupational Diseases

8.

Exposure to carcinogens, mutagens and biological agents

9.

Dangerous Occurrences

10.

What must be reported
-

E
xamples


Note: Purpose of This Document

This document contains the draft text of the proposed web
-
based guidance for RIDD
OR 2013.
As ultimately, this guidance will be published in web
-
format, users will be channelled to the
appropriate sections via hyperlinks. The vast majority of users will only need to refer to that
section of guidance which is relevant for their needs. Th
erefore, it should not be considered
as a linear document, which users will read from start to finish. Each section is essentially
self
-
contained, and whilst most are aimed at a generic business audience, some present
more specialist content, such as those

relating to offshore reporting requirements.


Current information at:
http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/key
-
elements.htm


Accident Reporting Requirements


Key Points & Exemptions

Key Points

Regulations 4

-

6 cover w
ork
-
related deaths and injuries,

other than for certain Gas Incidents {link}
RIDDOR requires deaths and injuries
to be reported only when:



There has been
an accident
which caused

the

injury;




The accident was
work
-
related
; and



Th
e injury is

of a type which is

reportable.

What is “an accident” ?

In relation to RIDDOR, an accident is a
discrete
, identifiable, uninte
nded incident which causes physical
injury. This specifically includes acts of non
-
consensual violence to people at work.

Injuries themselves, e.g. “feeling a sharp twinge,” are not accidents
. T
here must be an identifiable event,
external to the body whi
ch causes the injury,
e.g.

being struck by a falling object.
Cumulative exposures
to hazards which eventually cause injury (e.g. repetitive lifting) are not classed as “accidents” under
RIDDOR.



What is meant by “work
-
related”
?

RIDDOR only requires accide
nts to be reported if they arise “
out of or
in connection with work.” The fact
that an accident occurs at work premises does not, of itself, mean that the accident is work
-
related
-
there must be some ind
ication that the work activity
contributed to the cir
cumstances of the accident.
An accident should be considered as “work
-
related” if any of the following factors played a significant
role:



the way the work was carried out;



any machinery, other plant, substances or equipment used for

the work;
or



the condi
tion of the site or premises where the accident happened.

What are “reportable” injuries

The following injuries are reportable under RIDDOR:



The death of any person

(Regulation 6)



Specified
Injuries

to workers

(Regulation 4)



Injuries to workers which resul
t in their
incapacitation for more than 7 days

(Regulation 4)



Injuries to non
-
workers which result in them
being taken directly to
hospital for treatment
, o
r

specified

injuries to non
-
workers wh
ich occur on hospital premises. (Regulation 5)

Current information at:
http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/key
-
elements.htm


E
xemptions

Rep
orts are not required under RIDDOR in relation to the following:

(Regulation 14)



Accidents during
medical or dental treatment
,
or
during any
examination carried out

or supervised

by a doctor or
de
ntist
.



Accidents involving
the movement of a vehicle on a

public

road (
other than those associated with:
loading or unloading

operations; work alongside the road such as

road

maintenance; escapes of
substances from the vehicle;
and
accident
s involving
train
s.)



Accidents to
member
s

of the armed forces on duty
;

Reports are not required under RIDDOR where this would duplicate other similar reporting requirements
as listed. These include reports required under:



Nuclear Installations Act 1965



Merchant Shipping Act 1988



Ionising Radiations Regulations 1999



Civil
Aviation (Investigation of Military Air Accidents at Civil Aerodromes) Regulations

2005



Civil Aviation (Investigation of Air Accidents and Incidents) Regulations 1996



The Electricity Safety, Quality and Continuity Regulations 2002


Can HSE grant an exempt
ion to RIDDOR?


HSE has limited power to grant exemptions to the requirements of these Regulations. Exemptions can
only be granted where the provisions of European legislation allow and where the Executive is satisfied
that the health and safety of any peo
ple likely to be affected by them will not be adversely affected.


Appendix 2 Certificate of exemption < Link>
Current information at:
http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/
are
-
you.htm


Who is the responsible person?

The page explains who should and should not report incidents under

the reporting regulations
(RIDDOR).

An employe
r or in control of premises

If you are an employer

If you are an employer, you must report any work
-
related deaths,

and certain work
-
related injuries,
cases of disease,

and near misses involving your employees wherever they are working.

If you are in contr
ol of premises,

If you are in control of premises, you must report any work
-
related deaths, certain

injuries to members of
the public and self
-
employed people on your premises, and dangerous occurrences (some near miss
incidents) that occur on your premise
s.

Self
-
employed

If you are working in someone else’s work premises and suffer either a specified injury or an over
-
seven
-
day injury, then the
person in control of the premises

will be responsible for reporting, so,
where possible, you should make sure the
y know about it.

If there is a reportable accident while you are working on your own premises or in domestic premises, or
if a doctor tells you that you have a work
-
related disease or condition, then
you

need to report it.


Members of the public, employee
s, injured persons
and their representatives

The RIDDOR reporting system is only ;for notification of those incidents which require reports under the
RIDDOR regulations. Reports should only be submitted "Responsible Persons" with duties under these
regulat
ions, such as employers, the self
-
employed, and those in control of work premises where
incidents occur.
It is not appropriate for injured persons, members of the public or others who do
not have duties under RIDDOR to use this reporting system.

If you ar
e an employee and have suffered a work
-
related injury, or have been diagnosed as suffering
from a work related reportable disease, you should inform your employer. If you are concerned that your
employer or other Responsible Person has not made a required
report you should:



ask them if they have reported the incident, and/or;

Current information at:
http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/
are
-
you.htm




approach your employee or TU representative

If you still feel that your accident or work related disease has not been properly reported, you may

raise
your concern with HSE
.

If you wish to tell HSE about an incident, or have concerns about ongoing risks to health and safety,
please
refer to our advice
.



An Employment Agency

The employment status of agency workers is not always clear to the worker, or to the organisations w
ho
are supplied with labour. In many cases, the employment agency is the legal employer, and is under
the same legal obligations as any other employer to report accidents and ill health to their employees.
In
other cases, for instance where workers are se
lf
-
employed, the duty is on the host business to report
accidents as the person in control of the premises where an accident occurs. Self
-
employed persons are
responsible for reporting accidents which occur on their own premises, and ill
-
health conditions
.

In practice, agencies should ensure that responsibility for reporting under RIDDOR is clearly assigned to
the appropriate person based on the particular facts of the employment relationship. Agencies should
ensure that reporting responsibilities are clea
rly understood by host businesses and the workers.


A gas supplier

If you are a distributor, filler, importer or supplier of flammable gas and you learn, either directly or
indirectly that someone has died,
lost consciousness

or has been taken to hosp
ital because of an injury
suffered in connection with the gas you distributed, filled, imported or supplied, then this must be
reported.

In practice the reporting duties are usually undertaken by the gas Emergency
Service Providers (ESPs) representing ga
s conveyors.


Online form

A gas engineer

If you are a gas engineer registered with the Gas Safe Register, you

or your employer

must provide
details of any gas appliances or fittings
that you consider to be dangerous, to such an extent that people
could die or suffer a major injury, because the design, construction, installation, modification or servicing
could result in:



an accidental leakage of gas;



inadequate combustion of gas or ;



inadequate removal of products of the combustion of gas.

Current information at:
http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/
are
-
you.htm


Online form

Working offshore



For most incidents at an offshore installation, the responsible person will be
the duty
-
holder unde
r
the Offshore Installations and Pipeline Works (Management and Administration) Regulations 1995.



For diving projects, the responsible person in relation to accidents and dangerous occurrences is
the diving contractor.


HSE Offshore Safety Division can p
rovide specialist advice

on the reporting procedure for offshore
workers.


Special Cases (Mines, Quarries, Pipelines & Wells)


In the following special cases, the responsible person is:



In relation to a mine,
the manager

of that mine;



In relation to a clos
ed tip, the
owner of the mine

associated with that tip;



In relation to a quarry,
the operator

of that quarry



In relation to a
dangerous occurrence
:

o

At a pipeline, the
operator

of that pipeline;

o

At a well,
the person appointed
to supervise operations, or

wh
ere no person is appointed,
the
licensee

under Section 3 of the Petroleum Act 1998.


Current information at:
http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/what
-
must
-
i
-
report.htm


Types of
Reportable incidents



Deaths and reportable
injuries



Occupational diseases



Dangerous occurrences



Gas incidents

Deaths and
reportable
injuries

If someone has died or has been injured because of a work
-
related accident this may have to be
reported.

Work
-
related accidents

The accident that caused the death or in
jury must be connected to the work activity
. {LINK}


Types of reportable injury


The death of any person

All deaths to workers and non
-
workers, with the exception of suicides, must be reported if they arise
from a work
-
related accident, including an act o
f physical violence to a worker.

Specified injuries to workers

The list of ‘specified injuries’ in RIDDOR 2013 replaces the previous list of ‘major injuries’ in
RIDDOR 1995. Specified injuries
are

(regulation 4):



fractures, other than to fingers, thumbs a
nd toes;



amputations;



any injury likely to lead to permanent loss of sight or reduction in sight;



any crush injury to the head or torso causing damage to the brain or internal organs;



serious burns (including scalding) which:

o

covers more than 10% of the b
ody; or

o

causes significant damage to the eyes, respiratory system or other vital organs



any scalping requiring hospital treatment;



any loss of consciousness caused by head injury or asphyxia;



any other injury arising from working in an enclosed space whic
h:

o

leads to hypothermia or heat
-
induced illness or

o

requires resuscitation or admittance to hospital for more than 24 hours;

For further guidance on specified injuries, please see {Link}

Current information at:
http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/what
-
must
-
i
-
report.htm


Over
-
seven
-
day in
capacitation of a worker

A
ccidents

must be reported

where they result in
an employee or self
-
employed person being away from
work, or unable to perform their normal work duties, for more than seven consecutive days as the result
of
their injury. Thus seven day period does not include
the day of the acciden
t
,

but
does include

weekends and rest days. The report must be made within 15 days of the accident.

Over
-
three
-
day incapacitations

Accidents must be recorded, but not reported
where they result in a

worker

being
incapacitated
for
more than three consecutiv
e days
. If you are an employer, who must keep an accident book under
the Social Security (Claims and Payments) Regulations 1979, that record will be enough.

Non fatal accidents to non
-
workers (e.g. members of the public)

Accidents
to members of the public
or

others

who are not at work
must be reported
if they
result in an injury and
the person is

taken
directly
from the scene of the accident to hospital
for treatment to that injury. Examinations and diagnostic tests do not constitute ‘treatment’ in
such ci
rcumstances.

There is no need to report incidents where people are taken to hospital purely as a
precaution when no injury is apparent.

If the accident occurred at a hospital, the report only needs to be made if the injury is a
‘specified injury’ (see abov
e).

Occupational diseases

Employers and self
-
employed people must report diagnoses of certain occupational diseases,
where these are likely to have been caused or made worse by their work: These diseases
include (regulations 8 and 9):



carpal tunnel syndrom
e;



severe cramp of the hand or forearm;



occupational dermatitis;



hand
-
arm vibration syndrome;



occupational asthma



tendonitis or tenosynovitis of the hand or forearm



any occupational cancer



any disease attributed to an occupational exposure to a biologi
cal agent.

For further guidance on occupational diseases, please see {Link}

S
pecific guidance
is also available for
:



occupational cancers {Link}



diseases associat
ed with biological agents {link}

Current information at:
http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/what
-
must
-
i
-
report.htm


Dangerous occurrences


Dangerous occurrences are certain, s
pecified near
-
miss events. Not all such events require
reporting. There are 27 categories of dangerous occurrences that are relevant to most
workplaces
, for example:



the collapse, overturning or failure of load
-
bearing parts of lifts and lifting equipment;



plant or equipment coming into contact with overhead power lines;



the accidental release of any substance which could cause injury to any person.

For further guidance on these dangerous occurrences, please see {Link}

Additional categories of dangerous occ
urrences apply to mines, quarries, relevant transport systems
(
railways

etc ) and offshore workplaces.

{Link

to SI}


Gas incidents

D
istributor
s
, filler
s
, importer
s

&

supplier
s

of flammable gas

must report incidents where

someone has died, lost consciousness, or been taken to hospital for treatment to an injury
arising in connection with th
at

gas
. Such inciden
ts should be
reported
using

the

online form

.


Registered
gas engineer
s (under the

Gas Safe Register
,)

must provide details of any gas
appliances or fittings that
they

consider to
be dangerous, to such an extent that
people could
die, lose consciousness or require hospital treatment. The danger could be d
ue to

the design,
construction, installation, modification or servicing
of that appliance or fitting,
which could

cause:



an accid
ental leakage of gas;



inadequate combustion of gas or;



inadequate removal of products of the combustion of gas.

Unsafe gas appliances and fittings should be reported using
the
online for
m

Current information at:
http
://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/when
-
do
-
i
-
report.htm


When do I need to make a report?

For most types of incident, including



accidents resulting in the death of any person;



accidents resulting in specified injuries to workers;



non
-
fatal accidents

requiring hospital treatment
to non workers; and



dangerou
s occurrences

the responsible person must notify the enforcing authority without delay, in accordance with the
reporting procedure (Schedule 1.) This is most easily done by
reporting onlin
e
. Alternatively, for fatal
accidents or accidents resulting in specified injuries to workers
only
, you can telephone 0845 300 9923.

A report must be received within 10 days of the incident.

For accidents resulting i
n the over
-
seven day incapacitation
of a worker
, you must notify the enforcing
authority
within fifteen days of the incident, using the appropriate online form.

Cases of
occupational
disease
, including those associated with exposure to carcinogens, mutagens or
biological agents

should be rep
orted as soon as
the responsible person receive
s

a diagnosis
, using
the
appropriate
online form
Report of a case of disease.



Current information accessed via
http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/report.htm


Ways to submit a
RIDDOR

report

Who reports?

Only "
Responsible Persons
" including employers, the self
-
employed and people in control of work
premises should submit reports under RIDDOR. If you are an employee (or representative) or a member
of the pu
blic wishing to report an incident about which you have concerns, please
refer to our advice
.


Online

Responsible persons should complete the appropriate online report form listed b
elow. The form will then
be submitted directly to the RIDDOR database. You will receive a copy for your records



Report of an injury



Report of a dangerous occurrence



Report of an injury offshore



Report of a dangerous occur
rence offshore



Report of a case of disease



Report of flammable gas incident



Report of a dangerous gas fitting

If you have problems accessing a form, this may be due to the (Internet) security settings on the PC that
you are using. A series of
frequently asked questions

is available to help you complete your online form.


Telephone

All incidents can be reported online but a telephone service is also provided for reporting fatal and
specified
injuries
only

-

call the Incident Conta
ct Centre on 0845 300 9923 (opening hours Monday to
Friday 8.30 am to 5 pm).

Reporting out of hours

The HSE and local authority enforcement officers
are not an emergency service
.

More information on when, and how, to report very serious or dangerous incid
ents, can be found by
visiting the HSE
out of hours webpage
. If you want to report less serious incidents out of normal working
hours, you can always complete an online form.


Current information accessed via
http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/report.htm


Paper Forms

The
re is no longer a paper form approved for RIDDOR reporting, since the online system is the
preferred reporting mechanism. Should it be essential for you to submit a report by post, it should be
sent to:

RIDDOR Reports

Health and Safety Executive

Redgrav
e Court

Merton Road

Bootle

Merseyside

L20 7HS


Current information : Not Online


L73 Only


Specified Injuries to Workers

Further Guidance on Definitions

(Regulation 4)

a.

fractures, other than to fingers, thumbs and toes

Bone fractures

include a break, crack or chip. They a
re reportable when dia
gnosed or confirmed by a
doctor, including when
specified on a GP “fit note.” In some cases, there may be no definitive evid
ence
of a fracture (e.g. if an X
-
ray is not taken
)
,

but the injury will still be reportable if a doctor considers that a
fracture is

likely to have occurred. Self
-
diagnosed “suspected fractures” are not reportable.

b.

amputation of an arm, hand, finger, thumb, leg, foot or toe

Amputation includes both a traumatic amputation injury at the time of an accident, and surgical
amputation fol
lowing an accident as a consequence of the injuries sustained.

c.

any injury likely to lead to permanent loss of sight or
reduction in sight

in one or both eyes

Any b
linding and injuries causing reduction in sight
are reportable

when a doctor diagnoses th
at the
effects are likely to be permanent.

d.

a
ny crush injury to the head or torso causing damage to
the brain or internal organs

Injuries to the brain or internal organs within the chest or abdomen are reportable when caused by
crushing as result of an

accident.

e.

any burn injury (including scalding) which:

I.

Covers more than 10% of the whole body’s total surface
area; or

II.

Causes significant damage to the eyes, respiratory system
or other vital organs

B
urns
which meet the above criteria are reportable irr
espective of the nature of the agent involved, and
so include burns caused by direct heat, chemical burns and radiological burns.

Medical staff may indicate the approximate proportion of skin suffering burn damage, and charts are
often available in hospi
tal burns units. In adults of working age, the
Rule of
Nines can help
estimate the
body surface area (BSA)
affected:



Skin covering the head and neck: 9%



Skin covering each upper limb: 9%



Skin covering the
front of the torso
: 18%



Skin covering the
rear of t
he torso
: 18%



Skin covering each lower limb: 18%

If
the BSA of a burn exceeds 15% in an adult, they are likely to require hospitalisation for intravenous
fluid resuscitation.

Current information : Not Online


L73 Only



Where the eyes, respiratory system or other vital organs are significantly harm
ed as a consequence of a
burn, this is a reportable injury irrespective of the surface area covered by that burn. Damage
caused by
smoke inhalation is not included within this definition.


f.

any degree of scalping requiring hospital treatment

Scalping
i
s the traumatic separation or peeling of the skin from the head due to an accident,
e.g.

hair
becoming entangled in machinery. Lacerations where the skin is not separated from the head are not
included
, no
r

are surgical procedures where skin removal is del
iberate.


g.

any loss of consciousness caused by head injury or
asphyxia

Loss of consciousness means that the injured person enters a state where there is a lack of response ,
either vocal or physical, to people trying to communicate with them. The lengt
h of time for which a
p
erson remains unconscious is not significant in terms of whether an accident is reportable.

Asphyxia (lack of oxygen) may occur in situations where a person enters an oxygen
-
deficient
atmosphere, such as a confined space, or

are exp
osed to poisonous gases e.g. carbon monoxide
.

h.

any other injury arising from working in an enclosed space
which:

I.

leads to hypothermia or heat
-
induced illness or

II.

requires resuscitation or admittance to hospital for more
than 24 hours

An enclosed space i
ncludes any space which is wholly or partly enclosed to the extent that there
is a
significantly increased risk to the health and safety of a person within that space by virtue of its enclosed
nature. This would include any confined space as defined by the

Confined Spaces Regulations 1997,
and would additionally include similar spaces where there is a foreseeable risk of hypothermia (e.g. a
cold store.)

Nb. Hypothermia is not a specified risk within the meaning of the Confined Spaces Regulations
.

Hypotherm
ia and heat
-
induced illness includes situations where a person suffers an adverse reaction

(the physical injury)

to intense heat or cold acting on the body
, such that they require assistance from
another person.


Situations where the extent of an injury i
s unclear

In some instances, employers and self employed workers may not be in a position to know the full
extent of an injury, e.g. when
a prognosis has not yet been established

in relation to an eye injury
,

or
Current information : Not Online


L73 Only


when
efforts are being made to tr
eat an in
jured limb which may ultimately require surgical amputation. In
such situations, there is no requirement for reports of specified injuries to be made on a precautionary
basis. It is likely that the accident will in any case require reporting due to the inj
ured person being
incapacitated for more than 7 days. The enforcing authority should be notified

or updated

as soon as
a
specified injury has been confirmed. {Link}
Current information accessed
via hyperlink to SI:
http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1995/3163/contents/made



Occupational Diseases

Reportable Diseases

Regulation
8

requires
employers and self
-
emplo
yed people to report cases
of

certain
diagnosed
reportable
diseases
which are
linked with
occupational exposure to specified
hazards. The reportable diseases and associated hazards are set out below.

1.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
:

where the person’s work inv
olves regular use of percussive or
vibrating tools.

2.

Cramp of the hand or forearm
: where the person’s work involves prolonged periods of
repetitive movement of the fingers, hand or arm.

3.

Occupational dermatitis
: where the person’s work involves significant o
r regular exposure to
a known skin sensitizer or irritant.

4.

Hand Arm Vibration Syndrome
: where the person’s work involves regular use of percussive
or vibrating tools, or the holding of materials which are subject to percussive processes, or
processes caus
ing vibration.

5.

Occupational asthma
:
where the person’s work involves significant
or regular exposure to a
known respiratory

sensitizer

6.

Tendonitis or tenosynovitis
:
in the hand or forearm, where the person’s work is physically
demanding and involves freque
nt, repetitive movements.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is caused by compression of the median nerve, which controls sensation and
movement in the hand. It is not always caused by work related factors. Typically, workplace risks are
associa
ted with the use of hand
-
held vibrating power tools, such sanders, grinders, chainsaws etc.

Cramp of the hand or forearm

Where cramp is so severe as to give rise to a clinical diagnosis, it can be severely debilitating, and
impair a person’s ability to c
arry out their normal work. This condition is reportable when it is chronic,
and is associated with repetitive work movements. The condition is usually characterised by the inability
to carry out a sequence of what were previously well co
-
ordinated movemen
ts.

An acute incident of cramp which may occur in the course of work is not reportable
.

Occupational
Dermatitis


Dermatitis is reportable when associated with work
-
related exposure to any chemical or biological irritant
or sensitising agent. In particula
r, this will include any chemical bearing the warning “may cause
sensitisation by skin contact,” or “irritating to the skin.” Epoxy resins, latex, rubber chemicals, soaps and
cleaners, metalworking fluids, cement, wet work, enzymes and wood can all cause d
ermatitis. Corrosive
and irritating chemicals also lead to dermatitis. Construction work, health service work, rubber making,
Current information accessed
via hyperlink to SI:
http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1995/3163/contents/made



printing, paint spraying, agriculture, horticulture, electroplating, cleaning, catering, hairdressing and
florists are all associa
ted with dermatitis.

Dermatitis can be caused by exposure to a range of common agents found outside the workplace. If
there is good evidence that the condition has been caused solely by such exposure rather than by
exposure to an agent at work it is not re
portable.

Hand Arm Vibration Syndrome



Workers whose hands are regularly exposed to high vibration, for example in industries where vibratory
tools and machines are used, may suffer from

impaired blood circulation and damage to the nerves
in
the hand and
arm
; t
he

disease is known as ‘hand
-
arm vibration syndrome'.

Other names used in
industry include vibration white finger, dead finger, dead hand and white finger. Typically, workplace
risks are associated with the use of hand
-
held vibrating power tools, suc
h as percussive drills and
hammers, rotary grinders and sanders, chainsaws etc. Risks are also associated with the holding of
materials which vibrate while being processed by powered machinery such as pedestal grinders, riveting
machines, rotary polishers
etc.

Occupational Asthma

Asthma is reportable when associated with work
-
related exposure to any respiratory sensitizer. In
particular, this will include any chemical bearing the warning “may cause sensitisation by inhalation.”
Known respiratory sensitizer
s include epoxy resin fumes, solder fume, grain dusts and wood dusts and
other substances. Asthma is a common condition in the general population.

If there is good evidence that the condition was pre
-
existing, and was neither exacerbated nor triggered
by e
xposure at work; the condition is not reportable.

Tendonitis & Tenosynovitis

Tendonitis and tenosynovitis are types of tendon injury. Tendonitis means inflammation of a tendon, and
tenosynovitis means inflammation of the sheath (synovium) that surrounds a
tendon. Workers who are
required to undertake physically demanding, repetitive work are at increased risk of developing these
conditions. Physically demanding work includes (but is not restricted to) tasks involving repeated lifting
and manipulation of obj
ects (e.g. block
-
laying and assembly
-
line work), and activities requiring
constrained postures or extremes of movement in the hand or wrist.

Diagnosis by a Doctor

A reportable disease must be diagnosed by a doctor. Diagnosis includes the identification of

any new
symptoms, or the identification of any significant worsening of existing symptoms. For employees, the
diagnosis should be provided in writing to the employer. Doctors are encouraged to use standard
wording when describing reportable diseases on w
ritten statements which they make out for their
patients.

The Self
-
employed

Self
-
employed people do not normally obtain written statements from their doctors when off work
through illness. To take account of this, for a self
-
employed person, the doctor’s

verbal diagnosis of a
reportable disease is sufficient for it to require reporting to the enforcing authority. As with employees,
this only applies if their current job involves exposure to the associated hazard.

Current information N/A


L73 etc.


Exposure to carcinogens,

mutagens
and bi
ological agents

Regulation 9 requires e
mployers and self
-
employed workers
to

report cases of occupational
cancer, and any disease or acute illness caused by an occupational exposure to a biological
agent.

Occupational Cancers

Cases of cancer must be repor
ted where there is an established causal link between the type
of cancer diagnosed, and the hazards to which the person has been exposed through work.
These hazards include all known human carcinogens and mutagens, including ionising
radiation.

For exampl
e, the following

diagnosed

occupational cancers must be reported:



M
esothelioma or l
ung cancer in a person who is occupationally
expose
d
to asbestos
fibres



Cancer of the nasal cavity or sinuses in a person who is occupationally exposed to
wood dust

Reports
are only required when the person’s work gives rise to a significantly increased risk of
developing the cancer. In some cases, the medical practitioner may indicate the significance
of any work
-
related factors when communicating their diagnosis.

Cases of
cancer are not reportable when they are not linked with work
-
related exposures to
carcinogens or mutagens. As with other diseases, cancers are only reportable if the person’s
current job involves exposure to the relevant hazard.

Further guidance on occupa
tional cancers is provided at
http://www.hse.gov.uk/cancer/index.htm


Biological Agents

All diseases and any acute illness which requires medical treatment must be reported when it
is attributable to
a work
-
related exposure to a biological agent. The term biological agent is
defined within the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 [COSHH]
and means a micro
-
organism, cell culture, or human endoparasite which may cause infection,
all
ergy, toxicity or other hazard to human health. Work with hazardous biological agents is
subject to specific provisions within COSHH.

Work related exposures to biological agents may occur as a result of:



An identifiable event, such as the accidental breaka
ge of a laboratory flask,
accidental injury with a contaminated syringe needle or an animal bite; or



Unidentified events, where workers are exposed to the agent without their knowledge.
(e.g. where a worker is exposed to legionella bacteria whilst conduct
ing routine
maintenance on a hot water service system.)

Current information N/A


L73 etc.


A report should be made whenever there is reasonable evidence suggesting that the disease
was likely to have been caused by a work
-
related exposure. The
doctor

may indicate the
significance of any wor
k
-
related factors when communicating their diagnosis.

Further guidance on occupational
illnesses associated with
biological agents
is provided at:
http://www.hse.gov.uk/biosafety/infection.htm


Minor infections which are common in the community such as colds, bronchitis or stomach
upsets cannot generally be attributed to work
-
related exposures to biological agents, and thus
are generally not reportable. However, where there is reasonable eviden
ce of a work
-
related
cause, such as inadvertent contact with the infectious agent during laboratory work, a report
should be made.

Acute illnesses requiring medical attention must be reported when they result from a work
-
related exposure to a biological a
gent, including its toxins or any infected material.

Current information N/A


L73 etc.


Guidance on Dangerous Occurrences

The list of dangerous occurrences in Schedule 2

<Link>

is designed to obtain information
primarily about incidents which have a high potential to cause death or seriou
s injury, but
which happen relatively infrequently. Collecting the information gives the enforcing authorities
the opportunity to learn about the circumstances in which they occur and about their causes.
This
provides valuable

information which
both regula
tors and business
can be use to help
prevent
accident
s
.

For clarity, t
he
guidance below includes relevant extracts from the
Schedule 2

requirements:

Several types of dangerous occurrence require reporting in circumstances where the incident
has
the

potent
ial to cause injury or death.

This assessment
does not require any complex
analysis, measurement or tests, but rather for a reasonable judgement to be made as to
whether the circumstances gave rise to a r
eal, rather then notional risk.
Such judgement
allo
ws for prompt reporting, and ensures that valuable information is not lost.

Schedule 2 Part 1
-

General

Lifting equipment

1.

The collapse, overturning or failure of any load
-
bearing part of any lifting
equipment, other than an accessory for lifting.

The d
efinition covers the collapse

or overturning of any lifting equipment, or the failure
of any

load
-
bearing part
, whether used for lifting goods, materials or people. It does not cover the
failure of ancillary equipment, such as electric operating buttons o
r radius indicators, or
failures of lifting accessories, such as chains and slings.

Failure in this context refers to components which suffer mechanical breakdown during the
normal operation of the lifting equipment, as opposed to accidental or deliberate

damage.


Incidents involving cranes must be reported irrespective of the nature of the work being done,
and reports must not be restricted to those involving lifting and lowering. For example, a
collapse or overturning when a machine is being used for
dem
olition activities
must be
included.

Lifting equipment includes machinery such as bored piling rigs and percussion pilings rigs

Pressure systems

2.

The failure of any closed vessel or of any associated pipework (other than a
pipeline) forming part of a p
ressure system as defined by regulation 2(1) of the
Pressure
Systems Safety Regulations 2000
, where that failure could cause the death of
any person.

The definition covers the failure of closed vessels or associated pipework
in a pressure
system
(other tha
n a pipeline)
with the potential to cause the death of any person. It applies to
any such

vessel whatever its contents.

Incidents requiring notification due to having 'the potential to cause the death of any person'
include scaldings or burns arising from
contact with steam, hot water or other hot liquids,
liquors, products or substances, and immersion or splashing with chemicals.

Other examples of incidents which might be notifiable as having 'potential to cause death'
would be those where a person was ei
ther struck by, or could have been struck by, a
projectile emitted from the failure of a closed vessel under pressure. In the event of an
explosion, this might be a fixture or component, the vessel itself, or a secondary projectile
arising from the destruc
tion of structures close to the vessel, for example falling debris such
as masonry or window glass, or shrapnel from buildings or other structures.

Current information N/A


L73 etc.




Overhead electric lines

3.

Any plant or equipment unintentionally coming into:


a.

contact with an uninsula
ted overhead electric line in which the voltage exceeds
200 volts; or

b.

close proximity with such an electric line, such that it causes an electrical
discharge

Examples of the kinds of incident which are covered and which must be notified and reported
are:

(a)

accidental contact of a mobile crane or a vehicle with an overhead line;

(b)

accidental contact with an overhead line by something being carried or lifted; and

(c)

the collapse of something (eg an engineering structure) across an overhead line.

E
lectrical incidents causing explosion or fire

4.

Any explosion or fire caused by an electrical short circuit or overload
(including those resulting from accidental damage to the electrical plant) which either:

a.

results in the stoppage of the plant involved

for more than 24 hours; or

b.

causes a significant risk of death.

Where the failure of an item of electrical equipment
(including as a result of accidental
damage)
results in a fire or explosion, the failure is reportable as a dangerous occurrence if
the equ
ipment concerned is rendered unusable for over 24 hours, or if the occurrence was
one with the potential to cause the death of any person. The incident is reportable even if the
system in which the damaged equipment was installed is put back into service u
sing new
equipment within 24 hours. In such a case an assessment should be made on how long a
repair to the damaged equipment would have taken had it been attempted.

Explosives


5.

Any unintentional:

a.

fire, explosion or ignition at a site where the manufa
cture or storage of
explosives requires a licence or registration, as the case may be, under
regulation 9, 10 or 11 of the Manufacture and Storage of Explosives
Regulations 2005; or

b.

explosion or ignition of explosives (unless caused by the unintentional
di
scharge of a weapon, where, apart from that unintentional discharge, the
weapon and explosives functioned as they were designed to)

except where a fail
-
safe device or safe system of work prevented any person being
endangered as a result of the fire, explos
ion or ignition.

6.

The misfire of explosives (other than at a mine or quarry, inside a well or
involving a weapon) except where a fail
-
safe device or safe system of work prevented
any person being endangered as a result of the misfire.

7.

Any explosion, d
ischarge or intentional fire or ignition which causes any injury
to a person requiring first
-
aid or medical treatment, other than at a mine or quarry.

Current information N/A


L73 etc.


8.

(1) The projection of material beyond the boundary of the site on which the
explosives are being used,

or beyond the danger zone of the site, which caused or
might have caused injury, except at a quarry.

(2)

In this paragraph, “danger zone” means the area from which persons have
been excluded or forbidden to enter to avoid being endangered by any explosion

or
ignition of explosives.

9.

The failure of shots to cause the intended extent of collapse or direction of fall
of a structure in any demolition operation.

These

dangerous occurrence
s

refer to specific incidents arising in work situations from the
use of

explosives, and unintentional events at premises where explosives are manufactured
or stored. Further specialis
t advice can be sought from HSE

Explosives Inspec
tors
.


Biological agents

10.

Any accident or incident which results or could have resulted in
the release or
escape of a biological agent likely to cause severe human infection or illness.

Severe human infection

or illness

can be regarded as that caused by biological agents in
Hazard Groups 3 and 4 as defined in COSHH 2002 Schedule 3, paragraph 2(2
) and as set
out in the latest edition of the Management, design and operation of microbiological
containment laboratories11 or otherwise being agents classified provisionally by an employer
as being in one of those groups (COSHH Schedule 3, paragraph 2(2)
). More specialised
guidance on the application of this and other aspects of
RIDDOR in the healthcare sector

is
available from HSE.

R
adiation generators

and radiography

11.

(1) The malfunction of:

a.

a radiation generator or its ancillary equipment used in f
ixed or mobile
industrial radiography, the irradiation of food or the processing of products
by irradiation, which causes it to fail to de
-
energise at the end of the
intended exposure period; or

b.

equipment used in fixed or mobile industrial radiography or g
amma
irradiation, which causes a radioactive source to fail to return to its safe
position by the normal means at the end of the intended exposure period.

(2) In this paragraph, “radiation generator” means any electrical equipment
emitting ionising radiati
on and containing components operating at a potential
difference of more than 5kV.

There are two types of equipment whose malfunction is covered here: radiation generators
and equipment using radioactive sources (eg gamma ray sources).
A
radiation generato
r
means

any electrical equipment emitting ionising radiation and containing components
operating at a potential difference of more than 5 kV.

The processes covered include all types of industrial radiography
-

such as radiography in
fixed enclosures, site

radiography, and radiography in closed cabinets. Irradiation of food and
processing of products by irradiation are high
-
dose treatments and cover panoramic systems
as well as self
-
contained units. In each case it is the failure of the means for de
-
energis
ing the
radiation generator at the end of the intended exposure period that constitutes
the
dangerous
occurrence.

I
ncidents where equipment malfunction causes a radioactive source to fail to return to a safe
(shielded) position at the end of the intended
exposure period

are also reportable dangerous
occurrences
. The sources will commonly be gamma ray sources, but in industrial radiography
could be beta ray or neutron sources. The processes covered once again include all types of
industrial radiography, and

use of gamma irradiation equipment (panoramic or self
-
Current information N/A


L73 etc.


contained). The type of equipment must be such that the source goes from a safe state to an
exposed state in use, and operation of manual or automatic control systems normally returns
the source to its

shielded state. Any malfunction affecting the equipment and its control
system causing the failure of the source to return to this state at the end of the intended
exposure period constitutes a dangerous occurrence.

These incidents must be
reported

wheth
er or not anyone is exposed to ionising radiation as a
result of the incident occurring
, other than those incidents which
must be
reported under
the
Ionising Radiations Regulations 1999
.

(IIR)

Where a report is required under IRR, there is no
requirement t
o also report under RIDDOR, except in relation to offshore workplaces.

Breathing apparatus



12.

The malfunction of breathing apparatus:

a.

where the malfunction causes a significant risk of personal injury to the
user; or

b.

during testing immediately prior t
o use, where the malfunction would have
caused a significant risk to the health and safety of the user had it occurred
during use

other than at a mine.

This definition applies to breathing apparatus used under water as well as in contaminated
atmospheres o
r where there may be a lack of oxygen. It refers to a session of use of the
apparatus during or immediately before which a malfunction is detected. The malfunction may
be present and be detected immediately before the session (including any testing by the
wearer immediately before use), or it may occur at some point after the session has started.

The term 'malfunction' does not include leakage into a face mask due to a poor fit to the face
or a failure caused by an external source such as damage due to ent
anglement or falling
debris.

Diving operations

13.

The failure, damaging or endangering of:

a.

any life support equipment, including control panels, hoses and breathing
apparatus; or

b.

the dive platform, or any failure of the dive platform to remain on station

which causes a significant risk of personal injury to a diver.

14.

The failure or endangering of any lifting equipment associated with a diving
operation.

15.

The trapping of a diver.

16.

Any explosion in the vicinity of a diver.

17.

Any uncontrolled asce
nt or any omitted decompression which causes a
significant risk of personal injury to a diver.

Specialist advice is available from HSE Diving Inspectors.

Collapse of scaffolding

18.

The complete or partial collapse (including falling, buckling or overturn
ing) of:

a.

a substantial part of any scaffold more than 5 metres in height;

Current information N/A


L73 etc.


b.

any supporting part of any slung or suspended scaffold which causes a
working platform to fall (whether or not in use); or

c.

any part of any scaffold in circumstances such that there w
ould be a
significant risk of drowning to a person falling from the scaffold.

The incidents covered here are those involving any 'scaffold'. This include
s

any tower, trestle,
slung or suspended scaffold.

The figure of 5 metres used in relation to the heigh
t of scaffolding refers to the height of the
scaffolding itself from whatever base and not necessarily to the distance between the top of
the scaffold and the ground.

Incidents involving the failure of the suspension arrangements of slung or suspended
sca
ffolds are covered if the failure causes a working platform or cradle to fall. Reportable
failures of suspension arrangements would include failures of outriggers, roof rigs or
suspension ropes or winches.

Train collisions

19.


The collision of a train w
ith any other train or vehicle, other than a collision
reportable under Part 5 of this Schedule, which could have caused the death, or
specified injury, of any person.

This dangerous occurrence applies to railways
which are not

'relevant transport systems
.
' It
therefore applies to collisions between rail
-
mounted locomotives or trains and other vehicles
within factory or dock premises.
Incidents on relevant transport systems are cover
ed by
Schedule 2, Part 5

and further guidance is available from the Office
of Rail Regulation. <Link>

Wells

20.

In relation to a well (other than a well sunk for the purpose of the abstraction of
water):

a.

a blow
-
out (which includes any uncontrolled flow of well
-
fluids from a well);

b.

the coming into operation of a blow
-
out preventi
on or diversion system to
control flow of well
-
fluids where normal control procedures fail;

c.

the detection of hydrogen sulphide at a well or in samples of well
-
fluids where
the responsible person did not anticipate its presence in the reservoir drawn on
by
the well;

d.

the taking of precautionary measures additional to any contained in the original
drilling programme where a planned minimum separation distance between
adjacent wells was not maintained; or

e.

the mechanical failure of any part of a well whose purpo
se is to prevent or limit
the effect of the unintentional release of fluids from a well or a reservoir being
drawn on by a well, or whose failure would cause or contribute to such a
release.

The incidents listed are reportable in respect of all wells, both

onshore and offshore, drilled for
the exploration or exploitation of oil or gas, including the production of coal bed methane for
commercial purposes. They also apply to wells drilled in connection with the exploitation of oil
or gas, for example those us
ed to support reservoir pressure through water or gas injection.

Reports are required for all blowouts, including those of limited duration.

Reports are required for all incidents where a blowout preventer is closed or a diverter is
operated to control a
n unplanned flow into the well
-
bore from the adjoining formations, but not
where flow is planned as part of an operation. This includes 'underground blowouts', where
Current information N/A


L73 etc.


the well fluids flow to subsurface rock formations rather than to the surface. Reports are

not
required where flow is due solely to variations in the density of fluid across pipe installed in
the well bore, an effect commonly known as 'u
-
tubing'; nor where it is known that mud
previously lost to the formation is subsequently returned, an effect

commonly known as
'ballooning' or 'breathing'.

Failures of the primary pressure containment envelope of a well or of safety devices, namely
blowout preventers or surface, subsea and subsurface safety valves, should be reported
where there is a major loss

of pressure integrity requiring immediate remedial action. It is not
necessary to report minor leaks or failures found and rectified during routine maintenance,
including replacement of worn components. Significant leakages around a well of
hydrocarbon ga
s from shallow formations should also be reported.

All unplanned well intersections, where a well is unintentionally drilled into an existing one,
are reportable. 'Near misses' should also be reported if normal drilling operations have to be
interrupted t
o take remedial action to reduce the risk of collision.

Pipelines or pipeline works

21.

In relation to a pipeline or pipeline works:

a.

any damage to, accidental or uncontrolled release from or inrush of
anything into a pipeline;

b.

the failure of any pipeline

isolation device, associated equipment or
system; or

c.

the failure of equipment involved with pipeline works

which could cause personal injury to any person, or which results in the pipeline being
shut down for more than 24 hours.

22.

The unintentional chan
ge in position of a pipeline, or in the subsoil or seabed
in the vicinity, which requires immediate attention to safeguard the pipeline’s integrity
or safety.

The incidents listed are reportable in respect of both onshore and offsho
re pipelines or
pipelin
e works. The following types of pipeline are
not
covered by th
e
s
e

requirement
s
:


<Link to Exemption>



A drain or sewer



Any pipe used to provide heating or cooling, or for domestic purposes



A pipes used in the control or monitoring of plant



A pipe used for t
he conveyance of air, water
-
vapour or steam



A water pipe, other than when used for the purposes of injecting water into an underwater
well or reservoir containing mineral resources



A pipeline contained wholly within the premises of a single undertaking



A p
ipeline contained wholly within a caravan site



A pipeline contained wholly within land classes as a railway asset



Any part of a gas
-
supply pipeline which is downstream of an emergency control

Th
e phrase “accidental or uncontrolled release”

is not intended
to include minor leaks from
pipelines, eg small leaks from valve stems, flanges etc. However, sudden or uncontrolled
escapes requiring immediate attention or action should be reported.

Examples of reportable damage with the potential for harm would includ
e such things as
gouging, denting, buckling etc caused by external interference requiring immediate action.
Current information N/A


L73 etc.


Such damage mayor may not have resulted in any escape of the pipeline contents. Shutdown
following discovery of substantial internal or external cor
rosion, such that it would not be safe
to continue operating the pipeline, should also be reported. External coating damage without
damage to the underlying substrate would not be reportable.

Examples of reportable occurrences would include movement of of
fshore pipelines following
development of critical 'spans' and subsequent instability or displacement due to wave action
or boat impact. Occurrences not reportable would include spans detected and rectified as a
result of routine inspection activities.

Su
ch occurrences would include landslips, subsidence etc onshore, in the vicinity of pipelines,
and similar movement in the seabed.

Schedule 2 Part 2

The dangerous occurrences defined in Schedule 2

part 2 do not a
pply to offshore
workplaces.

Structural
Co
llapse

23.

The unintentional collapse or partial collapse of:

a.

any structure, which involves a fall of more than 5 tonnes of material; or

b.

any floor or wall of any place of work

arising from, or in connection with, ongoing construction work (including demoli
tion,
refurbishment and maintenance), whether above or below ground.

24.

The unintentional collapse or partial collapse of any falsework.

nly

structural collapses associated with ongoing construction,
maintenance and demolition
work are are required to be
reported under paragraph 23. However, the
paragraph 24
requirement to report unintentional collapses of falsework applies whether construction work
is taking place or not.


'F
alse
-
work' means any temporary structure used to support a permanent structure
during its
erection and until that structure becomes self
-
supporting.

Explosion or fire

25.

Any unintentional explosion or fire in any plant or premises which results in the
stoppage of that plant, or the suspension of normal work in those premises, for m
ore
than 24 hours.

This definition covers serious fires and explosions
at work premises.

Examples of the type of
incident which would be reportable are:



any fire at a factory or office building, causing the suspension of work activities for
more than 24 h
ours; or



an explosion involving dust in a pneumatic conveying system, causing stoppage of
the conveying plant for more than 24 hours.

Release of
flammable

liquids and gases


26.

The sudden, unintentional and uncontrolled release:

a.

inside a building

i.

of 100

kilograms or more of a flammable liquid;

Current information N/A


L73 etc.


ii.

of 10 kilograms or more of a flammable liquid at a temperature above its
normal boiling point;

iii.

of 10 kilograms or more of a flammable gas; or

b.

in the open air, of 500 kilograms or more of a flammable liquid or gas.

This definition is designed to cover releases of flammable liquids or gases (eg due to the
sudden failure of a storage vessel) where the release, if ignited, would cause a major
explosion or fire.

H
azardous escapes of substances



27.

The unintentional re
lease or escape of any substance which could cause
personal injury to any person other than through the combustion of flammable liquids
or gases.

The substances covered by this definition may be in any form: liquid, solid (eg powder),
gaseous or vapour and

may include, for example:



substances which may be hazardous to health (eg asbestos, p
hosgene, toluene
diisocyanate);



substances which may be either corrosive or potentially hazardous by virtue of their
temperature or pressure (eg nitric acid, molten meta
l, liquid nitrogen);

This definition includes incidents which present a fire or explosion hazard (e.g. combustible
powders, but not in relation to releases of a flammable liquids or gases, where the relevant
thresholds in paragraph 26 above are not exceed
ed.

Examples of the kinds of incident covered by the definition are escapes arising from the
failure or breakage of plant, pipes, equipment or apparatus; failures of process control; the
operation of a relief valve or bursting disc where the escaping subs
tance is not safely
controlled or directed; and spillages from containers and equipment.

Releases from plant etc during the normal course of operation or maintenance (eg during
sampling, packaging or draining of lines) that are sufficiently well controlle
d to ensure that no
person is put at risk would not be reportable.

In some cases, t
he decision as to whether or not an incident is reportable

will be
straightforward, for example if the incident results in a person being exposed to a hazardous
substance a
t a level which exceeds established safe limits. (e.g. a Workplace Exposure
Limit.)

However, most incidents will require judgement. Various factors are relevant including:

the
nature of the substance and its chemical, physical and toxicological properties
, the amount
which escaped and its dispersal, and whether

people
were

or could forese
e
ably
have
been
exposed to a significant risk
as a consequence of the escape.


Schedule 2 Part 3
-

Mines

DANGEROUS OCCURRENCES WHICH ARE REPORTABLE IN RELATION TO MINES

Specialist advice is available from HSE Mines Inspectors.

Schedule 2 Part 4
-

Quarries

DANGEROUS OCCURRENCES WHICH ARE REPORTABLE IN RELATION TO QUARRIES

Specialist advice is available from HSE Quarry Inspectors.

Current information N/A


L73 etc.


Schedule 2 Part 5


Relevant Transport S
ystems

DANGEROUS OCCURRENCES WHICH ARE REPORTABLE IN RESPECT OF RELEVANT
TRANSPORT SYSTEMS

These incidents should be reported to the Office of Rail Regulation, who publish their own
guidance on RIDDOR.

<link>

Schedule 2 Part 6


Offshore Workplaces

The d
angerous occurrences in this part are reportable only if they
occur at an offshore
workplace.

Most of the incidents are further restricted to those involving offshore i
nstallations
only
. Note that in this section 'offshore installation' includes subsea uni
ts, but excludes tied
back wells, pipelines and associated apparatus or works within 500 m of the installation's
main structure, and fixed towers not associated with oil and gas activities.

Release of petroleum hydrocarbon


75.

The unintentional release o
f petroleum hydrocarbon on or from an offshore
installation which:

a.

results in:

i.

a fire or explosion; or

ii.

the taking of action to prevent or limit the consequences of a potential fire
or explosion; or

b.

could cause a specified injury to, or the death of, any pe
rson.

This refers to confirmed unintentional releases of petroleum hydrocarbons. Suspected
releases which turn out to be false (eg spurious alarms) are not reportable.To be reportable,
releases must also lead to one of the following outcomes:



a fire or ex
plosion. This includes all types of fires, ie flash, jet or pool, regardless of
the length of time of burning;



action to prevent or limit the consequences of a potential fire or explosion. A release
with the potential for fire or explosion would involve a

risk of fire or explosion sufficient
to require preventive or evasive action. Small gas leaks detected during routine
monitoring and maintenance, eg Draeger tube checking on valves, seals etc where
there is limited risk to personnel, need not be reported.

To be reportable, the action
taken must be intended to prevent or limit the consequences of a potential fire or
explosion. Simply taking action to confirm a release following an alarm, for example
by instrument reading, but which requires no further actio
n, would not be reportable.
However, it may precede more direct action which is reportable. Examples of actions
which would mean that the release is reportable are:

-

emergency stoppage of individual plant, either automatically or by operator
intervention,
to control leakage of proce
ss or non
-
process hydrocarbons;

-

permit
-
to
-
work following confirmation of a hydrocarbon release with a
potential for fire or explosion; operation of deluge, fixed fire
-
fighting system,
blowdown etc or other preventive or limiting
measures as a result of a
confirmed hydrocarbon release;

-

general shutdown, muster, evacuation of the area, or any combination of
these actions following a confirmed release.

Current information N/A


L73 etc.




the potential to cause death or major injury to any person. Hydrocarbon releases

not
covered above, but which may also give cause for concern (eg where associated with
high hydrogen sulphide (H2S) toxicity, or where the release is dispersed or exhausts
a limited inventory before action can be taken) are also reportable.

Fire or explo
sion

76.

Any fire or explosion at an offshore installation, other than one caused by the
release of petroleum hydrocarbon, which results in the stoppage of plant or the
suspension of normal work

This covers fires or explosions
other than those caused by t
he release of petroleum
hydrocarbon,
such as:



hydrocarbon releases from flares, vents or diverters which exceed operational limits;



inadvertent internal combustion, for example of unspent fuels within turbines or of
flame/explosion propagation within fla
re systems; and



fires or explosions involving wood, paints, explosives etc.

Release or escape of da
ngerous substances


77.

The unintentional or uncontrolled release or escape of any substance (other
than petroleum hydrocarbon) on or from an offshore ins
tallation which could cause a
significant risk of personal injury to any person.

This covers releases of substances such as stored chemicals, superheated steam, or H2S
where not

associated with hydrocarbons.

Collapses

78.

Any unintentional collapse or par
tial collapse of any offshore installation or of
any plant on an offshore installation which jeopardises the overall structural integrity
of the installation.

E
quipment

79.

The failure of equipment required to maintain a floating offshore installation on
s
tation which could cause a specified injury to, or the death of, any person.

Dropping objects

80.

The dropping of any object on an offshore installation or on an attendant
vessel or into the water adjacent to an installation or vessel which could cause a
s
pecified injury to, or the death of, any person.

Weather damage

81.

Any damage to or on an offshore installation caused by adverse weather
conditions and which could cause a specified injury to, or the death of, any person.

Collisions

82.

Any collision bet
ween a vessel or aircraft and an offshore installation which
causes damage to the installation, the vessel or the aircraft.

83.

Any occurrence with the potential for a collision between a vessel and an
offshore installation where, had a collision occurred,

it might have jeopardised the
overall structural integrity of the installation.


Current information N/A


L73 etc.


It will not always be possible to estimate with any accuracy whether a collision could have
occurred or what the consequences might have been. HSE is primarily interested to
know of
incidents in which the dutyholder considers there was a significant risk to the installation.

Subsidence or collapse of seabed

84.

Any subsidence or collapse of the seabed likely to affect the foundations or the
overall structural integrity of an
offshore installation.

Loss of stability or buoyancy

85.

Any incident which causes the loss of stability or buoyancy of a floating
offshore installation.

Evacuation

86.

The partial or complete
evacuation of an offshore installation in the interests of
safe
ty.

Full or partial evacuation may be a response to an incident separately reportable under these
Regulations (eg a fire or explosion), in which case it is not reportable under this paragraph.
This definition
seeks to
include

incidents not otherwise report
able, in which the risks are
sufficient to warrant evacuation. It does not cover exercises or precautionary measures.

Falls into Water


87.

Any fall of a person into water from more than 2 metres
Current information
-

http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/do
-
i
-
need
-
to
-
rep
ort.htm



What must be reported
-

examples

Here are some example scena
rios
, explaining wh
ich incidents
should
and

should not be reported under
RIDDOR:

Road
-
traffic accidents/accidents caused by vehicles
on
a road?

A driver was seriously injured in a collision with another vehicle on a motorway.

No.


The accident should be reported to the police who have primary responsibility for enforcing road
traffic legislation.


Most injuries resulting from the movement

of vehicles on public roads
are not
reportable under RIDDOR, as they are covered by the exemption in regulation 14(3).

Two of our staff received major injuries when one who was driving our delivery truck collided
with a forklift truck that the other was d
riving. The accident happened on the private road around
our site.

Yes
. The exemption for reporting road traffic accidents only applies to vehicles on a ‘road’ as defined in
s.192 of

the Road Traffic Act 1988.

If the site road is genuinely “private,” and

the public do not normally
have access, then it is not within this definition and the accident must be reported.

Two shoppers were injured and taken to hospital for treatment when their cars collided on a
supermarket car park.

No
,
unless

the circumstances

were directly linked to supermarket’s work. Just because an accident
occurs on work premises, this does not make it a work
-
related accident. This could be the case if
supermarket staff had contributed to the circumstances of the collision by directing tra
ffic movements, or
by erecting an advertising board which had obscured drivers’ visibility.

Our delivery driver was hit
by a car when unloading his van on the road

and sustained a broken
leg
.

Yes
.

If an accident involves the loading or unloading of a veh
icle, d
eaths and injuries
must be reported
as normal
. The exemption in regulation 14(3) does not apply in such circumstances.

A road worker was
injured when a car crashed through the coned
-
off area where they were
working

and has been unable to work for m
ore than 7 days.

Current information
-

http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/do
-
i
-
need
-
to
-
rep
ort.htm



Yes.


I
f
an accident involves
maintenance or construction work on the road, its verges or an

adjacent
building or structure, deaths and injuries must be reported as normal. The exemption in regulation 14(3)
does not apply in such circumsta
nces.

A security guard suffered a broken arm

when a thief hit them when making a getaway in a car.

If the car was being driven on a road, then it is not reportable. If this was in a private area then it would
be reportable as an act of non
-
consensual viole
nce to a person who was at work.

Violence at work?

Our receptionist was injured when they were hit at work. The assailant was their partner and the
argument was about their personal life, not work.

No
. Although acts of non
-
consensual physical violence to a person at work are included in the definition
of an accident, the accident must
be work
-
related
. This

was

not, it was a personal matter.

A custome
r in a shop was hit by another customer and taken to hospital for treatment.

No
. Acts of non
-
consensual violence

are only considered as work
-
related accidents if

injured person
was at work.

One of our staff was verbally abused. Although they were not phys
ically hurt, they were shaken
up. They took two weeks off sick because of this incident.

No.


RIDDOR only requires deaths and physical injuries to be reported in relation to accidents, including
those involving acts of non
-
consensual violence.



Injuries in schools?

I report injuries to school pupils and college students. What category should I use


on the F2508
form under "Injured Person's Empl
oyment Status"?

Students and pupils are not at work and therefore are regarded as members of the public (MOPs) for
this part of the form. The exception is they are participating in a recognised training scheme or work
experience.


Under health and safety l
aw,

students and pupils (including children) are regarded as
employees in such circumstances. The employer should report the injury as if they were one of their
employees.

Are accidents to pupils sustained in PE lessons reportable under RIDDOR?

Current information
-

http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/do
-
i
-
need
-
to
-
rep
ort.htm



No, most a
re not.


Such accidents only require reporting if:



The pupil is killed or taken to hospital for treatment to an injury (i.e. not as a precautionary
measure); and



the accident
was work
-
related in that it
arose out of or in connection with the work of the sc
hool
or college, rather than as a consequence of the normal risks associated with participation in physical
activities. For example, if the accident was caused by faulty equipment or inadequate supervision.

Are sporting injuries reportable?

No, most are n
ot
, since they arise out of the normal participation in a sporting activity (for example, a
heavy tackle in football.
)

Injuries should only be reported if they arise out of or in connection with a work
activity, such as those due to defective equipment or
failings in the organisation and management of an
event.

What if the pupil is taken to hospital as a precaution but the examination shows no injury?

No.

RIDDOR only requires injuries to be reported, if the medical advice is that the pupil was not injured
i
n any way then there is no need to report this.

Do I need to know what treatment was given by the hospital before I report an injury to a pupil?

There is no requirement to check that treatment is actually administered by the hospital.

The
requirement to r
eport is based on the pupil being taken to hospital for treatment to an injury. If an injury
is identified at the scene as requiring hospital treatment, then this should be reported. If no injury is
evident, and the school receives no information that any
injury has been treated, then no report is
required.

The key thing to
consider

when determining whether to report an incident to a pupil or other pe
rson

who
is

not at work is
whether

the accident arose out of or was connected with the work activity.

Some

of our pupils have been hurt in a road traffic accident on the way to school in the school
bus. Should I report their injuries?

No.

Deaths and injuries that result from the movement of a vehicle on a road do not
usually
have to be
reported (see above sect
ion on road traffic accidents
.
)



A pupil has been injured while on a school trip abroad. Should I report this to HSE?

Current information
-

http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/do
-
i
-
need
-
to
-
rep
ort.htm



No.

HSE does not have jurisdiction when the pupil is outside the country so RIDDOR does not apply. A
report may have to be made to anothe
r appropriate authority though. (For example the school may need
to report the incident to other bodies such as the local safeguarding committee).

Gas Incidents

Who incidents

should be reported

under Regulation 11(1)?

Conveyors, fillers, importers and supp
liers of gas through fixed pipe systems have a legal
duty to report incidents which have resulted in a death, person(s) found unconscious or been
taken to hospital
,

where
flammable
gas
is considered likely to be a
potential cause. In
practice the reporti
ng duties are usually undertaken by the gas Emergency Service Providers
(ESPs) representing gas conveyors.

What does not need to be reported?

Incidents where people have taken themselves to hospital or been taken to another medical
facility (eg ‘walk
-
in
-
c
entre’) are not reportable.

What should I do if an investigation shows that gas was not the cause of the incident
after all?

The Incident Contact Centre should be notified and the details on the form amended
http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/amending
-
reports.h
tm. It is important to do this so HSE has an
accurate record of gas incidents.

What dangerous gas fittings are reportable under RIDDOR 11(2)?

‘Fittings’ includes appliances and flues or ventilation which have, or could have been likely to
cause death or
a person being rendered unconscious or required taking to hospital. In
practice, this means fittings which are classed as being ’immediately dangerous’ under the
Gas Industry Unsafe Situations Procedure (GIUSP) should be reported.

What dangerous gas fitt
ings are not reportable under RIDDOR 11(2)?

Installations which are dangerous solely due to a lack of maintenance are not reportable
under RIDDOR. Additionally dangerous non
-
gas safety defects are generally not reportable
(examples include damaged or inapp
ropriate electrical connections and hot water cylinders
without pressure relief).

Current information
-

http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/do
-
i
-
need
-
to
-
rep
ort.htm



I found a dangerous gas fitting but it was repaired at the time. Does this still need to be
reported?

Yes. Even though the defects have been repaired, the dangerous gas fitti
ng should still be
reported

I have found a dangerous gas fitting in a rented house which was a result of a lack of
maintenance. How should these be reported?

These fittings would not be reportable under RIDDOR. However landlords have duties to
maintain gas

appliances, flues and pipe work in a safe condition. Should dangerous gas
appliances/fittings be found in rented accommodation due to lack of maintenance, details
should be sent to HSE as a concern
.http://www.hse.gov.uk/contact/ HSE will then decide
w
hether or not to investigate these matters further.


People not at work?

A member of the public tripped over a trailing cable and hurt themselv
es badly. We didn’t call an
ambulance as their friend drove them to a hospital.

Yes
. You must report cases where a person not at work is injured due to a

work
-
related

accident and is
taken from your premises to a hospital, by whatever means, for treatment.

A person fainted and as a precaution they were taken to hospital.

No
.

Reports are only required for injuries resulting from a work
-
related accident. This is not usually the
case where people have been taken ill.


Also, precautionary hospital attendance i
s distinct from
attending hospital for treatment to an injury.

A shopper had a serious injury but said they were okay and wouldn’t go to hospital.

No.

The duty is for a report to be made when a person not at work is injured because of a work related
accid
ent and is taken, by whatever means, to a hospital for treatment.

A member of the public fell over in our premises, as a precaution they went to hospital but when
examined the hospital said they had no injuries.

No.


RIDDOR only requires you to report when

people have been injured because of a work related
accident
, i
f the hospital cannot find any injury th
ere is no need to make a report. Generally, however,
Current information
-

http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/do
-
i
-
need
-
to
-
rep
ort.htm



unless they are informed voluntarily, businesses have no means finding out what treatment a member o
f
the public has received. The judgement as to whether a work
-
related accident has caused an injury
requiring treatment should be made on the basi
s of the information available.

A person slipped over in the shop but said they were unhurt. Much later they
told us they had
gone the next day to their GP who then referred them to hospital.

No.


The injured person must be taken from where the accident happened, by whatever means, to a
hospital for treatment. A GP practice or a drop
-
in clinic is not a hospital,

and so there is no duty to
report.

Suicide and self
-
harm?

No.

Suicides and cases of self
-
harm

are not reportable as there is no accident
from which the death or
injury results.

Mental Health Issues
?

Are cases of occupational stress reportable as lost
-
time injuries?

No
.

For t
he purposes of RIDDOR reporting, an accident is considered to be something which causes
physical injury. This is because s
tress
-
related conditions usually result from a prolonged period of
pressure, often from many factors,
rather than
just one distinct ev
ent.

This does not mean that stress
cannot be raised with the enforcing authorities
,

nor does it mean that a complaint cannot be made which
could result in an investigation

What about post
-
traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following a one
-
off incident?

No
.


For the purposes of RIDDOR reporting, an accident is considered to be something which causes
physical injury.
PTSD is a recognised medical condition and is regarded as a disease
. Since i
t is not one
of the listed occupational diseases, cases do not need

to be reported.


Occupational Diseases
?

For a disease to be reportable:

It must be one of the 8 types of condition listed below, and it m
ust be likely that it was caused or made
worse by the person’s current work.

(For further information, refer to <LINK>)


Current information
-

http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/do
-
i
-
need
-
to
-
rep
ort.htm



1.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
: where the person’s work involves regular use of percussive or vibrating
tools.

2.

Cramp of the hand or forearm
: w
here the person’s work involves prolonged periods of repetitive
movement of the fingers, hand or arm.

3.

Occupational dermatitis
: where the person’s work involves significant or regular exposure to a
known skin sensitizer or irritant.

4.

Hand Arm Vibration Synd
rome
: where the person’s work involves regular use of percussive or
vibrating tools, or the holding of materials which are subject to percussive processes, or processes
causing vibration.

5.

Occupational asthma
:
where the person’s work involves significant or

regular exposure to a
known skin sensitizer or irritant

6.

Tendonitis or tenosynovitis
: in the hand or forearm, where the person’s work is physically
demanding and involves frequent, repetitive movements.

7.

Occupational Cancer
: any cancer attributed to an occu
pational exposure to a known human
carcinogen or mutagen (including ionising radiation. <Link>

8.

Exposure to Biological Agent:
any disease (including any acute reaction requiring medical
treatment) attributed to an occupational exposure to a biological agent
. <Link?

A retired employee has been diagnosed with an asbestos
-
related disease. The work used to
involve working with asbestos but hasn’t for many years.

No
, this case is not reportable as the
condition was not caused or made worse by the person’s curre
nt
work.

Dangerous occurrences?

Schedule 2 of RIDDOR
<Link to SI>
lists the specific near
-
miss incidents that must be reported.

For
furth
er information see <Link to DO Guidance>

Failures of Lifting Equipment
?

A sling fails during a lift do I need to report this?

No.

The req
uirement is to report when a load bearing part of any lifting equipment fails. You don’t have
to report failures of lifting accessories.

Electrical incidents

causing explosion or fire
?

When should I report an electrical short
-
circuit or overload?

Current information
-

http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/do
-
i
-
need
-
to
-
rep
ort.htm



You must report an electrical short circuit or overload
(including those resulting from accidental damage)
that causes a fire or explosion and ei
ther stops the plant involved being used for more than 24 hours or
could cause death.


A short circuit occurs when there is unintended or accidental contact between
conductors in a system caused, for example, by a failure of the insulation in the equipment
, or a metal
tool such as a pick axe being driven into a live cable, or a metal object being dropped onto live parts in
electrical equipment. Most reportable incidents of this type occur on power systems energised at or
above the mains voltage of 230 volts
, although some occur at lower voltages.

An overload occurs when more electrical current flows in a system than the system was designed to
carry, leading to overheating and the possibility of fire.



Cable strikes
-

An underground electricity cable was str
uck, causing a bang and a flash
-
over. We
were told by the distributor that it is below 230 Volts. Is it reportable?

It depends upon the circumstances, and a degree of judgement is required. The cable is ‘plant’ as
defined, and a short circuit occurred whe
n the cable was struck, causing the bang and flash
-
over
(explosion). However, the incident would not be reportable if the cable was repaired within 24 hours, and
there was no potential for the death of any person.

The incident would be reportable


if:



it
took longer than 24 hours to repair the cable; or



the explosion had the potential to cause fatal injuries; or



the cable was energised at a voltage high enough to cause electrocution, and was struck by a
person holding a conducting object such as a metal to
ol.

Please note:



Contact with the energised exposed conductors of an electrical cable or circuit operating above
50 V alternating current (AC) or 125 V direct current (DC) could cause death by electrocution.



A mechanical tool penetrating an energised ele
ctric power cable will create a short circuit either
between two or more of the phase conductors within the cable or between the outer earthed
armouring of the cable and one or more of the phase conductors within the cable

A telecoms cable was struck, cau
sing a flash. Is it reportable?

No
, Telecoms cables and Cable TV cables are normally below 50 V (aAC ) or 125 V (DC) and the
amount of energy in the flash is unlikely to cause death.

Current information
-

http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/do
-
i
-
need
-
to
-
rep
ort.htm



A temporary supply cable on a building site has been struck; I have been

told it’s supplied from
a 110 Vac centre
-
tapped
-
to
-
earth transformer. Is it reportable?

No,

electrical cables connected to this type of equipment are designed so that the risk of death is
negligible.


Dangerous substances?

We have been told that our cooling tower has the legionnella bacteria and this will have been
released into the surrounding area.
No
. The escape or release of a biological
agent must only be
reported if it causes

or is likely to cause

severe human infection or illness. In practice, this means a
biological agent in hazard groups 3 or 4 in Part V, Schedule 3 of the Control of Substances Hazardous
to Health Regulations 2002 (CO
SHH). Legionnella is in group 2, so it is not reportable.

Construction Incidents
?

A scaffold has collapsed do I need to report this?

Only if

the scaffold

which collapsed was

more than 5 metres in height. (Measured from its base, which
may not necessarily be on the ground.)

A self
-
employed subcontractor sustains an over 7 day injury on a construction site, who should
report it?

The
responsible

person

is
deemed to be
the person
in control of the construction site where the
accident occurred, in many cases this will be the principal contractor.

Where the self
-
employed person
is in control of the site (e.g. on a small site where no other contrac
tors are working,) they should report
the accident themselves.

During the construction of a concrete wall, the timber structure built to contain the wet concrete
and reinforcement during the concrete pour collapses. There are no injuries. Is this reportabl
e?

Yes,

all failures of false w
ork are reportable under RIDDOR Schedule 2, Part 2 (24).

RIDDOR talks about "Construction work", what does this mean?

"Construction work" is defined in the
Constructio
n Design and Management Regulation
.

Incidents
involving
children’s play equipment?

A child, under the supervision of their parent, falls from play equipme
nt in a Local Authority
maintained children’s play area, breaking their arm.

Current information
-

http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/do
-
i
-
need
-
to
-
rep
ort.htm



No
. If the equipment was in good working order and free of defects.

What if the child was under the supervision of someone at work, such as a childminder?

An accident would gener
ally be reportable if it was attributable to a failure of staff to supervise play
activities properly (when it was being carried out under their charge), or a failure of health and safety
management systems.

Incidents on countryside visits?

A visitor to a national park trips and falls on naturally occurring rocks whilst hill climbing,
breaking their arm.

No
, the hill is part of the wild natural e
nvironment, and the accident


arose as a consequence of the
normal risks associated with hill
-
climbing
.

Visitors embarking on hill climbs should be prepared with
suitable clothing and equipment and undertake walks suited to their level of fitness.

A visito
r to a formal garden of a stately home trips and falls on gardening debris left on a path,
spraining their ankle.

Yes
, The garden is a managed attraction , and the accident is attributable to a failure to maintain the
paths in good order and clear of obstr
uctions.

Sporting injuries?

Are sporting injuries reportable?

No
, if the injury arose out of the normal participation of the activity. Injuries s
hould be reported if they
were due to defective equipment or failings in the organisation and management of an event.

Fairground injuries?

A member of the pub
lic banged their head on the ride when it stopped unexpectedly. They
looked OK but went off to hospital for a check up anyway.

Yes
, if there was an apparent head injury. You must report cases where a person not at work is injured
due to a work
-
related acci
dent, and is taken from your premises to a hospital for treatment to that injury.
However, if are you later informed


that the hospital could find no injury, not even a minor cut or
abrasion, then you do not have to make a report. Where there is no apparen
t injury, and a person is
taken to hospital as a purely precautionary measure, this should not be reported.

Current information
-

http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/do
-
i
-
need
-
to
-
rep
ort.htm



Catering & hospitality accidents?

A customer is acciden
tally scalded while being served hot soup by staff and is taken to hospital
for treatment.

Yes
. The accident arose from a work activity
-

serving soup.

A customer knocks their soup bowl off the table while reaching for a wine glass
-

they sustain
minor bur
ns.

No
. Just because an accident occurs on work premises, this does not make it a work
-
related accident.
The accident did not arise out of or in connection with work, it was caused by


the customer’s own
actions. .

An employee steps out of his private car
in the office car park. In doing so, he somehow twists
his ankle. As a result he has more than 7 days off work. The employee had not yet started work
for the day. There were no defects to the car park surface, debris or spillages etc. present that
may have

contributed to the incident and the light was good.

No
. Provided that there was nothing about the condition and design of the car park surface, condition,
slope, weather conditions, lighting etc which contributed to the accident.

Just because an acciden
t
occurs on work premises, this does not make it a work
-
related accident.

NB

-

If the injured employee was not “at work” then their employer,


being in control of the premises,
would


still have to report any work
-
related accident which required the injur
ed person to be taken to a
hospital for treatment. So if the injured person put their foot in a pot hole and twisted their ankle, then it
might be reportable as being work
-
related, if they had just stepped awkwardly out of the car, then not.

A barman is at
tacked by a member of the public when the barman requested the customer to
leave as the bar was closing.

Yes
. Injuries to people at work which ‘arise out of or in connection with work’ caused by a non
-
consensual act of physical violence are reportable.