The 8 National TVET Forum

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1



The 8
th

National TVET Forum


Surging
A
head
t
owards Quality and Relevance


December 11
-
12, 2008

TESDA Women’s Center, TESDA Complex,

Taguig City




A.

Introduction


1.

The
8
th

National

TVET
Forum
with the theme
“Surging Ahead towards
Quality and Relevance”
aime
d
to have

a common understanding and
appreciation of the seven thematic areas

namely: assessment and
certification, labor market information (LMI), Philippine Qualification
Framework (PNQF), Philippine TVET Trainers Qualification Framework
(PTTQF), Asia Pa
cific Accreditation and Certification Commission
(APACC), enterprise
-
based training and education tourism.

It was
designed
to draw out issues, needs and policy requirements
,
to generate
policy recommendations and
to come up with a policy
resolution.


2.

It wa
s attended by
some 303

participants
composed of the TESDA Board
members, TESDA Officials,
Officials and members of
the League of
Offshoring and Outsourcing Partners @ Philippines, Inc. (LOOP),
heads
or representatives of schools and training centers, both
public and private
and participants from industry.

The list of participants is attached as
Annex

A
.


3.

R
esource persons

from the government, industry, and education and
training sectors were invited
to provide insights

and

to talk about issues
under each t
hematic area
.

They are
as follows:



Name of Resource Persons

Topic/Paper Presented

Clifford A. Paragua

Executive Director

TESDA


Philippine National
Qualifications Framework:
Harmony in the Philippine
Education System


Mr. Antonio C. Keh

Vice
-
President
,
Philippine Chamber of
Commerce and Industry
, NCR


Addressing the Jobs
-
Skills
Mismatch

Mr.
Philip Torres

Director

Gokongwei Brothers Foundation

The Philippine TVET
Trainers/Assessors
Qualification Program


2

Name of Resource Persons

Topic/Paper Presented

Technical Training Center




Dr. Alberto Victor
P. Fenix

President, New Tech Pulp

(Former TESDA Board Member)



Competency Assessment
and Certification

Dr. Alex P. Ocampo

Organizational Development Manager

LEAR Corporation

(DTS Accredited Institution)


Enterprise
-
based Training

Bonifacio Mercado

Cent
er for Industrial Training and
Enterprise

(DTS Accredited Institution)




Professor TJ Gayondato

Colombo Plan Staff College


Asia
-
Pacific Accreditation
and Certification Commission

Undersecretary Mona Dumlao Valisno

Presidential Assistant for Education


Education Plus!



B.

Opening Ceremonies


4.

The Forum formally started with the Opening Ceremonies. After the
opening prayer and singing of the national anthem, welcome remarks and
messages were delivered by the guest speakers.


5.

Secretary Augusto Boboy Syjuco
,
Director General, TESDA
gave the
Welcome Remarks.

He welcomed the participants to the Forum.


6.

The DG informed that
TESDA organized the 7
th

of a series of National
TVET F
or
a which brought together the three education agencies,
Department of Education, Com
mission on Higher Education and Technical
Education and Skills Development Authority
.


7.

The need to look back and direct priorities and energies where the best
position fits to effectively address possible adverse effect of the financial
crisis, both to lo
cal and overseas workers is a must. Tech
-
voc sector is
truly demand
-
driven, rapid, flexible, and competency
-
based and
immediately transits our workers to available jobs in the market.



3

8.

TESDA has been fortunate to earn the trust and confidence of President
Gloria Macapagal Arroyo for allowing the annual allocations of PhP 1.2
billion for the continuing resource for the training of people in highly
demanded jobs. Due to the President’s intervention, the hiring rate for call
center agents increased form a dism
ally low of 3% to a positively high
63.81%. Moreover, the animation and the software developer

subsectors
have recorded 100% absorption of their respective graduates. This is in
partnership with the Business Process Outsourcing sector.


9.

The Free Assessment

Service of TESDA or FAST in the 125 TESDA
Technology Institutions was implemented for the past two years, thus,
TESDA gone beyond through the implementation of the Expanded FAST.


10.

Proper credentialing of tech
-
voc trainers should be seriously tackled. The
implementation of the Philippine TVET Trainers Qualification Framework
and the National TVET Trainers/Assessors Qualification Program will
eventually earn their stripes. The National TVET Trainers Academy
(NTTA) had undergone training, assessment and certi
fication to 6,800
tech
-
voc trainers. However, thousands more are still needed to be trained.


11.

TESDA is a major part of the office advocacy in the pursuit of quality
assurance mechanic that will effectively enhance the quality of tech
-
voc
institutions. The

TESDA Women’s Center has earned APACC
accreditation, Silver Level. And 16 more TESDA technology institutions
are lined up next year.


12.

TESDA likewise acknowledges partnership with LOOP official and the vital
support of the DOLE Secretary for providing a fo
rum for the discussion of
issues and concerns affecting the TVET sector and maintaining a healthy
dynamism in the labor market respectively.
(See Annex
B
)


13.

Dr. Hernando “Nani” Perez
,

Chairman, League of Offshoring and
Offsourcing Partners @ Philippines, In
c.,

conveyed in his message that if
we all work towards the empowerment of our workforce it is like a pot of
gold. He emphasized that we should address the problem of job
-
skills
mismatch, it is our task on qualifying our trainers and assessors. If we
wor
k on this particular problem we will be surging ahead towards quality
and relevance.


14.

He informed that LOOP is currently uniting the call centers, other ICT
companies, TVI and other industry partners towards placing avenues of
possibilities for our Filipi
no workers to find skills and work opportunities
leading to the betterment of life as well as betterment of our country. With
the help of TESDA, the LOOP would like to pursue an effective
collaboration and partnership among stakeholders to provide the worl
d
class Filipino workforce. He stressed that as the term LOOP connotes a

4

”never ending process”, so training of an effective Filipino workforce shall
never be an ending process. He urged everyone to help one another, and
see to it that we will have the Fil
ipino workforce, which we will develop to a
never ending process.
(See Annex

C
)


15.

Undersecretary

Luzviminda G. Padilla

of DOLE delivered
a

Message

in
behalf of Secretary Marianito D. Roque who is on official foreign travel.
She commended everybody for succ
essfully putting together the 8
th

National TVET Forum which as in the previous Fora showcases effective
partnerships between and among TVET stakeholders.


16.

DOLE for its part addresses the possible employment impact of the global
financial crisis. Two months

ago, DOLE presented to the president a
preliminary assessment of the situation and how best to respond to the
situation.


17.

On October 14, DOLE presented to the President the DOLE Contingency
Plan which contains a set of interventions to address the possibl
e
displacement of workers in the overseas employment sector and the
export sector. On November 19, a multi
-
sectoral consultation on the
financial crisis was held to surface issues and concerns relative to its
impact on employment, working conditions and pr
oductivity.


18.

With the global financial crisis, our challenge in the Forum is to come up
with new strategies and initiatives to cushion its expected impact
particularly in generating and preserving jobs for our local workers and
OFWs.


19.

In reference to the
main topic of the Forum, TVET champions must
recognize that globally
-
competitive workers are those who have the
capacity to perform today’s and tomorrow’s jobs, one whose skills and
competencies can be easily transported to other jobs. Today’s employers
pr
efer workers who possess an effective interface of hard trades or
technical competencies that enable workers to produce tangible products
and soft trades or those basic competencies such as good communication
skills, strong analytical and conceptual skill
s, leadership, and initiative to
assure themselves of well
-
paying jobs and job security.


20.

It is within this context that DOLE proposes a strengthened partnership
with TESDA and other stakeholders in intensifying its drive to upgrade the
quality of TVET in

the country ready to invest in human capital formation
and development.


21.

To address youth unemployment, there is a need to use tech
-
voc training
centers as social safety net and adopt active labor market policies to help
them find work and other income
-
ea
rning activities. This means that

5

TESDA must continue to provide scholarships, career guidance and
counseling, and training for work interventions for the youth and TESDA
must continue to expand the pool of qualified TVET trainors. Furthermore,
TESDA must
strengthen TVET by making it more accessible and
equitable by improving assessment and certification process and by
enhancing the employability of TVET graduates. This way, we can
effectively promote TVET not only as an alternative but complementary to
for
mal education.

(See Annex D)



C.

Paper Presentations


22.

Executive

Director Clifford A. Paragua

discussed
the relationship of the
seven thematic areas

titled “Unifying the Thematic Areas”
.
He enunciated
the process which would show the interrelationship of the
7 thematic
areas.


23.

T
he
industry

sector
is

one of

the main sou
rces of labor market information
a

vital input in addressing the labor and supply mismatch. The industry
sector is

also
the main
source of
information

about

skills competency
standards

which are
the main

ingredients of job qualifications
covered in

Training Regulations

(TRs).

T
he TESDA Board promulgate
s

TRs
to
become the national minimum standards
. This includes the following
major components: curriculum, tools and equipment, training facilities

and
trainers’ qualification.


24.

Technical Vocational Institutions (TVIs) that satisfactorily comply with the
minimum standard can have their TVET programs registered by TESDA
and apply for a quality accreditation thus, making them qualified to
participate

in the education tourism programs and have this accessible to
tourists. And, in partnership with TVIs, commercial and industrial
enterprises can develop skills and competencies of workers in an
enterprise
-
based setting.
(See Annex
E
)



25.

Mr. Antonio C. Keh
,

PCCI Vice President
,

presented
the paper on
“Addressing Employment and Skills Mismatch for Gainful Employment:
Mainstreaming Public
-
Private Partnership in Education for Gainful
Employment Agenda”.



26.

He emphasized that the private sector has always been a
staunch
supporter of labor market developments in the country. The present
economic situation calls for a stronger linkage among government,
academe and the private sector to assist our graduates in their pursuit for
gainful employment.


27.

There is also a ne
ed to tighten the linkages between higher and
polythechnic education which is the most synergistic process in affecting a

6

demand
-
based approach to address the mismatch between industry
needs and supply of graduates.


28.

The establishment of a common database
shall have to be undertaken by
both the industry

associations and academic institutions. This will allow
information sharing and feedback on job vacancies and qualifications
required for certain positions in a company.

(See

Annex

F
)
.


29.

Dir. Philip Torres
, o
f the Gokongwei Brothers Foundation (GBF) made a
presentation on the “Technical Trainors and Assessors Training” The GBF
Experience.


30.

The JG Summit Group (John Gokongwei founder and current Chairman
Emeritus) is the most diversified conglomerate in the P
hilippines with 14
core businesses and 24,000 employees. Their businesses are currently
located in 7 countries in Asia and with an asset of about PhP 230 billion
that includes food, agri, property, polyolefins, telecom, retail, banking and
airline among o
thers.


31.

As a spirit of gratitude for market patronage, the GBF is giving back to
society its assistance by focusing on education in the belief that it is the
best means of impacting social development. It has grants/endowments
with several universities as
well as corporate
-
run projects in the country.
The GBF Technical Training Center, a finishing school for engineers
provides full tuition plus stipends for 6 months
-
1 year Engineering
Technician Course. The JG Summit Group likewise trains aircraft
maint
enance and pilots for Cebu Pacific and engineers/technicians for JG
Petrochem.

(See Annex
G
)


32.

On the Teacher Training aspect, GBF procure and develop its technical
faculty based on recruitment and selection, pre
-
employment preparation
and in
-
service upgrad
ing. Teaching efforts are focused on instructional
competence in underlying theory (Concepts and Principles clarification,
skilled performance (CBT) and collegial problem solving (TEAMS).


33.

Graduates of the GBF are submitted for assessment by the hiring
co
mpany with the industry liaison officer serving as observer in required
qualification activities. The hiring companies are involved in various stages
in the training process with exception in trade areas and technologies with
stringent supervising authorit
y.



34.

Dr. Alberto Victor P. Fenix
,
President, New Tech Pulp and former
TESDA Board Member

dealt
on Competence
-
Based Qualification and
Certification System
.




7

35.

The Competence
-
based Qualification and Certification System started
with seven (7)
priority
industr
y sectors
. A TESDA Advisory Panel (TAP
)
was

constituted for each sector, while a TESDA Expert Panel (TEP) was
organized for each of the priority Qualifications under the 7 sectors.

Under
the system,
the Training

Regulations for each Qualification is esta
blished,
including the competencies that comprise the Qualification, how
competencies are taught, the minimum standards for training materials
and facilities and national assessment and certification arrangements.

A
qualification is composed of basic, comm
on and core competencies
.


36.

Competence is simply a statement of the required attitudes, skills and
knowledge for a specific job. It should provide directions for designing
learning experiences and assignments
.
A National Qualifications
Framework, which is
market led must be established to streamline the
processes for giving recognition to the
competence of

an individual.


37.

All persons certified for a Qualification must form a
guild,

which can be a
partner of TESDA in promoting and further professionalizing
.
(See Annex
H)


38.

Dr. Alex P. Ocampo
, Organizational Development Manager of LEAR
Corporation
focused on
LEAR DTS Partnership.



39.

He started his presentation by introducing the corporation. LEAR
Corporation is a Dual Training System (DTS)
-

Accredited Partner
of
Center for Industrial Training and Enterprise (CITE), a DTS institution
accredited by TESDA


Region VII.

It

is one of the world’s leading
suppliers of automotive seating systems, electrical distribution systems
and related electronic products. The co
mpany’s products are designed
and manufactured by a diverse team of 91, 000 employees.


40.

The company f
orged a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with CITE on
May 27, 2005 and had trained 1,127 Trainees
(Female
-

405 or 36%;

Male

-

722 or 64%) as of 2007.

It had
a
bsorbed and employed 388 trainees
(51% female and 49%
m
ale) in 2007.


A total of
1,722 trainees were
acco
mmodated (35% female, 65% male)

i
n 2008
.


41.

Mr. Ocampo also explained
how the

trainees acquire their knowledge and
enhance their skills
by presenting

t
he Training Process Flow.

Incentives
given to Trainees in addition to the 85% of the minimum wage training
allowance are basic meal allowance subsidy, overtime meal allowance
subsidy, overtime allowance, company recreation and outing, medical and
dental as
sistance and Christmas gift
.



8

42.

There are a
dvantages of EBT to the company. These are: it supports
operational flexibility, better qualification/competence of workers,
recruitment advantage and sharing opportunity.


43.

The
Company’s
Criteria for

Trainees’ Eval
uation and Absorption

as
regular workers
are the following:

(See Annex I)


-

Competent Rating covering work attitude, EHS Procedure compliance,
productivity, quality output, attendance, cooperation and teamwork, job
flexibility and knowledge company rules an
d regulation compliance;

-

Verified to have no problem with attendance or not having disciplinary
action
;

-

Completed and passed all the school (CITE) requirements, both
academic and non
-
academic
;

-

Compliance to the pre
-
employment requirements; and

-

Acceptance o
f the Absorption offer.


44.

Mr. Bonifacio Mercado
,
CITE, presented the implementation of the Dual
Training System in CITE. Adopting the DTS, he mentioned that the
institution is offering Industrial Technician Program, a 3
-
year post
secondary technician progr
am with specialization on Industrial Electrical
Technology, Industrial Electronics Technology, Mechanical Technology,
Telecommunication Technology, Information Technology, Electronics
Technology and Computer Technology. Since 1994, a total of 1,748
gradua
tes with retention rate of 95% and employment rate of 85% have
been produced by the institution under the Information Technology Dual
Training Program. On the other hand, CITE’s Industry Skills Training
Program on Production Technology produced a total of

2,208 graduates
with an employment rate of 85% since 2000.


45.

Likewise, he stated that from 1997
-
2008, they were able to forged
partnerships with 187 companies. The types of companies that supported
the implementation of DTS belong to the Manufacturing, Foo
d and
Beverages, Service and Sales industries. They are located in Cebu City
and its Provinces, Mindanao, Manila, MEPZ and abroad.

(
See Annex
J
)
.


46.

Professor TJ Gayondato
,
Colombo Plan Staff College

presented his
paper “Asia Pacific Accreditation and Certi
fication Commission
”.
Accreditation

has a dual purpose, namely: quality assessment, and quality
improvement. This makes accreditation both a process, and a status.
Program accreditation focuses on a study program within an institution.
Each program has its

own distinctive definitions of eligibility and standards
for accreditation. The process of accreditation is

as follows:
application,
self study,
e
xternal
s
urvey
, r
eport,
and j
udgment.



9

47.

The APACC institutional accreditation starts when
an
applicant submits

accomplished application form endorsed by NCAs/NAB/HRDA. APACC
then processes the application within a week then notifies the institution
on the successful outcome then requires them to submit online
for the
Self
-
study guide. Applicant then prepares the r
equired documents based
on the Self
-
study guide within two to three months.


48.

APACC reviews the SSR submitted and will conduct an on
-
site visit and
evaluates and inspects the applicant based on APACC’s criteria and
policies. If the result of the report of t
he on
-
site visit team is acceptable,
applicant is notified of the accreditation status awarded. If not accredited,
applicant may appeal, wherein if accepted, will accomplish necessary
corrective actions within 6 months. (See Annex
K
).


49.

Undersecretary Mona

Dumlao
-
Valisno
,
Presidential

Assistant for
Education
,
presented

a development strategy dubbed as Education Plus!
Program. This initiative is a cross
-
cutting program of the entire
government system and industry that aims to position the Philippines as a
kn
owledge
-
center in Asia and the Pacific for global education. The
program offers foreign nationals the opportunity to learn technical skills,
skills certification, academic credits and academic degrees while enjoying
the tourist destinations that only the
Philippines can offer.


50.

According

to Undersecretary Valisno, Education Plus is highlighted by five
(5) significant objectives which shall support the program: 1) establish the
Philippines as a Center for Excellent International Education; 2) boost the
country’s dollar earnings in education; 3) serve as a poverty alleviator
through the creation of jobs; 4) improve the investment climate; and 5)
broaden and strengthen areas of studies and/or course offerings at a
globally competitive level.

Thus, it prom
otes the excellence of education
as it develops the economy in terms of producing globally competitive
human resource pool and raises revenue in the education and the
economy as a whole.


51.

She shared further that an inter
-
agency Philippine Team has conv
ened a
technical working group composed of key player agencies. The Team
Philippines has identified a four
-
pronged approach to fulfill the vision of the
program. These are to 1) build up the existing reputable educational
institutions within the country; 2
) foster international linkages; 3) promote
courses and training programs where the country has a competitive
advantage; and 4) attract a sizeable amount of international students to
the Philippines.


52.

Undersecretary Valisno wrapped up her presentation by

informing the
body that sustainable measures were recommended
and legislation of an
Executive Order was proposed by Team Philippines to assure the

10

sustainability of the program and put into proper perspective, the
importance and urgency of Education Plus.

(
See Annex
L
)


53.

Director

Clifford A. Paragua
,
TESDA

presented The Philippine National
Qualifications Framework (PNQF)
.

T
he PNQF aims at clearly identifying
all national qualifications awarded in the Philippines; establishing a
coherent, high
-
quality, inter
nationally benchmarked national credentialing
system; ensuring all qualifications awarded have a purpose and relation to
one another that parents and students can clearly understand;
establishing a concrete and practicable system of credit transfers; and
a
chieving international recognition of the credentials issued.


54.

T
he conceptual framework/diagram of the PNQF (please refer to the
PowerPoint presentation). At the base of the diagram is basic education
(elementary and secondary/high
-
school education). On
this base the
technical and vocational education and training (TVET) and higher
education (HE) streams or bands are built. These bands are linked by a
bridging program (from TVET to HE) or similar articulation scheme from
TVET to HE and vice versa.


55.

The
re a
re four options for graduates of high school or secondary
education under the present and proposed set
-
up in the PNQF. Option
no. 1 is for the graduate to enroll in a baccalaureate or Bachelor’s degree
program of 4 or 5 years in a CHEd
-
recognized coll
ege or university. He
said this is what most parents would want for their sons/daughter to be
college graduates. Option no. 2 is for the graduate to enroll in a
ladderized program leading to both a bachelor’s degree and one or more
national TVET qualific
ations. Option no. 3 is for the graduate to enroll in a
shorter
-
term program or programs leading to one or more TVET
qualifications in the form of a National Certificate from levels I to IV.

The
fourth option is for the graduate to enroll in a shorter
-
ter
m program (which
may vary from 1
-
year to 3
-
year) leading to a Diploma or Advanced
Diploma as proposed under the PNQF. Such course s would cover also
the general
-
education subjects required for a Bachelor’s degree and
hence ensure articulation to a bachelo
r’s degree from the TVET
qualification, in effect providing a more “seamless” link from TVET to
higher education.


56.

With such four options, the PNQF in effect provides clearer definition of
pathways
to TVET and higher education. (See Annex M).




11


D.

Roundta
ble Discussions
/Output Presentations



57.

Director Elmer K. Talavera
,
TESDA Region XI
, presented

the Workshop
Mechanics.
(
See Annex
N
)
.


58.

The participants
were divided

into
seven groups
.

Group

assignments

were

determined

in accordance with indications provide
r earlier by the
TESDA Regional Offices to the National Secretariat

as per
r
egional
/provincial zonal consultations
conducted in preparation to the
conduct of the National Forum.


59.

The round table discussions
covered
the following

topics:





TVET Trainers an
d Assessors Qualification



Competency Assessment and Certification



Enterprise
-
based Training



Education Tourism



National Qualifications Framework



Third Party Accreditation for Quality Assurance



Closing the Gaps between TVET Outputs and Industry Needs



RTD output
s are

attached as Annex
O
.


60.

The workshop output
s

were presented in a plenary session. Some issues
and concerns were raised.


Thematic


Area
s

Issue
s

Remarks/

Recom
mendations


PNQF


P
ossibility/option of the
Advanced Diploma as an
additional level

in the PNQF


No objections from the group


LMI


Specify data on 3
-
5 year
forecast of manpower
needs/projections from
BPO/DTI and other sources
on:



BPO
-
English



Welding
-
Technical
English



Tourism/Hospitality



Health and Wellness



Agri
-
fishery skilled
manpower




Include the print/media
industry as additional
priority sector



Look at the issue of skilled
workers in the printing
industry (press operators)
being pirated for overseas
jobs



Use “pure” English and not
“Taglish as medium of
instruction



Strengthen the tea
ching of
basic “English”


12

Thematic


Area
s

Issue
s

Remarks/

Recom
mendations



Graduates must be able to
express themselves in
conversational English



Focus not more on English
proficiency but how to
express ideas

Capability Building/Training
for Career Guidance
Counselors and Placement
Officers



Need for tra
ining/retraining
of career counselors



Need to hire separately the
recruitment/placement
officers and career
counselors



E.

Presentation of Forum Resolution


61.

Mr. Pingol

of LOOP and
Director Paragua

of TESDA presented the Forum
Resolution to DDG Milagros Dawa
-
Hernandez.

(
See Annex
P
)
.



F.

Acceptance Message


62.

DDG Milagros Dawa
-
Hernandez
,in behalf of Secretary Augusto Boboy
Syjuco accepted the unfinished resolution that includes policy and
operational matters. She thank
ed

the participants for the additional inpu
ts
generated during the Forum and informed that some of the
recommendations have long been studied and review
ed

by TESDA. She
stressed that this will indeed be a monumental development that will
require new policy framework, policy redefinition or moderati
on and will
serve as basis in determining the efficiency and effective of our
implementation. She likewise assured everyone that TESDA will continue
to discuss with LOOP and continue addressing the recommendations as
well as building consensus not only on

the internal sector but among
others who support the sector.


63.

The DDG

then congratulated everyone for the success of the Forum
despite the very short period of time to organize. She honored and
acknowledged the contributions of the LOOP team as well as t
he TESDA
team.
(See Annex

Q
)



G.

Closing Remarks


64.

Mr. Enrique Pingol
, President
,

LOOP delivered the Closing Remarks.
He
expressed his gratitude to everybody for convening the Forum with a

13

common objective to further enhance the delivery of education and
tra
ining services to our future professionals. He stressed that the Forum is
an examination process of what we do and what we need to do. It signifies
a serious intent to hopefully stop concerns of inconsistencies that all are
parties of. Furthermore, it shal
l serve as a catalyst of change and
transformation. Lastly, he emphasized that actions are needed in these
trying times to secure stable and consistent subsistence.

(See Annex
R
)