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2

Identity
:

An Interdisciplinary Unit with a Focus
on Aboriginal Education

For Grade 2

By: Tori Staseson


http://www.poughkeepsieschools.org/pages/students/act
ivity/images/circle_logo.gif


3

Table of Contents:

______________________________________________________________________________


Introduction…………………………………………………………………………
……………
..
3



Scope and Sequence



Objectives


Unit
Web
…………………………………………………………………………………………
..5


Essential

Questions

(Content and Unit Question)
………………………………………………...
6



Background Knowledge/Fact Sheet
……………………………………………………………
7
-
8


Resource List
……………………………………………………………………………………...
9


Unit Introduction
…………………………………………………………………………………
10



Identity/
The Circle of
Courage


Lesson 1
: Social Studies
……………………………………………………………………
...
11
-
13




Inuit Life:
Then and Now



Target


Lesson 2
:
Visual Art
………………………………………………………………………

.
14
-
16



Sash Bracelets



Target


Lesson 3
:
Physical Education
………………………………………………………………
...17
-
19



Métis Dancing



T
arget


Lesson 4:
Language Arts
...............................................................................................
...........20
-
22



Legends



Target


Lesson 5
:
Health
-
Nutrition
…………………………………………………………………
...23
-
25



Making Bannock
/Potluck


Unit Closure……
………………………………………………………………………………...
26


Unit Rubric
…………………………………………………………………………
…………
….
27



Unit Rubric
for Student

Self
Assessment

……………………………………………………….28


Writing Journal…
……………………………………………………………………………
29
-
37


4


Introduction
:


The following unit wa
s

developed
as an interdisciplinary
approach
for grade

two
students to
develop their understanding of identity
. The unit
carries

an underlying
theme of

Aboriginal
E
ducation

which will be taught

with a focus upon the Circle of C
ourage model
. This model
wil
l

be used to help students to
learn to
respect the

diversity of all people
. This unit is directly linked
to the curriculum

in the subject areas of Social Studies, Arts Education, Language Arts,

Physical
Education, and Health, although many of the lessons
could be directly linked to other subject
areas.


I hope you enjoy the unit!



Scope and Sequence:


This unit was designed to

be
taught
in the classroom ove
r the span of eight days although ther
e is
time within that period
where to adapt to the needs of th
e learners

if need be.

The unit consists
of five fully devel
oped lesson plans as well as an activity to

introduce and close the unit.


Objectives:


Social Studies
:


Knowledge Objectives

Students will know that:



The school has evolved over time.

Skills/Abi
lities Objectives

Students will:



Identify and describe school experiences and technologies of the

past.

Arts Education
:



The students will:



Begin to develop skills that help them depict people and objects
accurately.



Become aware of the visual environme
nt and visual art in the daily life
of own community

Language Arts
:



The students will:



Learn about and practice the skills and strategies of effective listeners



Write to express thoughts, information, feelings, and experiences in a
variety of forms for a

variety of purpose and audiences







5

Physical Education:

Students will:



Apply movement concepts and principles to the learning and development of
movement patterns and
skills.

o

Demonstrate basic dance steps and patterns alone and with others

o

Perform simpl
e movement sequences using
Movement Variables

of
Body, Space, Effort and Relationships, alone and with others, with and
without equipment

Health:



Students will:



act on their knowledge about maintaining or improving their health

o

make choices about food based on the needs of their bodies
































6

Essential Questions:


Unit Summary
:


The following unit will be focused upon the theme
of identity
by using a
n

interdisciplinary
approach. Aboriginal Education is an important

aspect of the theme of this unit and will be
woven into the lessons.


Essential Question
:

What is identity?


Unit Questions:

1) What

is the Circle of Courage?

2)

Why is it import
ant to learn about other peoples identities?


Content Questions:

1)
What
types of things make

up an individuals identity?

2) What makes up your identity?






























7

Background Knowledge/Fact Sheet
:


RESOURCE
S
:


1)

THE VIRTUAL MUSEUM OF MÉ
TIS HISTORY AND CULTURE
: GABRIEL

DUMONT
INSTITUTE OF NATIVE STUDIES AND APPLIED RESEARCH

http://www.metismuseum.ca/browse/index.php/965



2)

WILFRED BURTON CLASS PRESENTATION AND HANDOUT/NOTES


Social Studies:



Historically in

abor
iginal cultures the schooling was taught by people in the
community and parents and grandparents.



In the past aboriginal children went to boarding schools as well



Currently aboriginal children go to school in towns or
the city although some
go to schools on their reserves.


Visual Art:




The Métis sash is used for many purposes:

o

Hold up clothing

o

Carry

items (food,

water,

babies, etc)

o

As a cloth

o

As a rope

o

To give to a friend/family member as a gift



Woven together with mu
lticolored

wool


Physical Education:





Métis Dancing is sometimes referred to as jigging



Many dances are done to the music from a fiddle



Many

different jigging steps
-

Here are some of them are to name a few:

o

Chi Galop

o

Cross Step

o

Bunny Step

o

Double Heal

o

Back
/Front Cross

o

Marching Step

Language Arts:



In aboriginal culture, elders told stories and legends



It is still a common tradition today



There is supernatural aspects to many Métis stories



A way of teaching children about their history


Health:



One traditiona
l Métis food is Bannock


8



Bannock can be cooked in a stove, on a griddle, or even over a fire



Bannock is good to eat for energy when being active



Bannock is not overly healthy and should just be enjoyed as a treat because it
is it quite high in fats




Circl
e of
Courage
:


Source
:
http://maxweber.hunter.cuny.edu/pub/eres/EDSPC715_MCINTYRE/CircleOfCourage.html



Was created by Larry Brendtro, Martin Brokenleg, and Steven Van Bockern



Includes four components
-
Generosity, Belonging, Mastery, and
Independence.



Used t
o represent how people should behave.



Is framed around Respect





Gabriel Dumont Institute of Native Studies and Applied Research


















9

Resource List:


Student Resources:


1)

William Roy Brownridge
-
The

Moccasin Goalie

2)

Joseph Bruchac and James Bru
chac
-

How Chipmunk Got His Stripes

3)

Wilfred Burton
-

Fiddle Dancer

4)


Jeanne Bushey
-

Inuit Still

5)

Louise Erdich
-

Grandmothers Pigeon

6)

Larry Loyie
-

As Long as the River Flow
s

7)

Cynthia Leitich Smith
-
Jingle Dancer

8)

Bonnie Murray
-

Li Minoush

9)

Jerrie Oughton
-
How the S
tars Fell into the Sky

10)

Jean E Pendziwol
-
The Red Sash

11)

Chiori Santiago
-
Home to Medicine Mountain

12)

Doris Seale and Bev Slapin
-

A Broken Flute

13)

Teri Sloat
-

Berry Magic




Teacher Resources:


14)

Integrating Aboriginal Content and Perspectives in Curricula
-
Wilfred
Burton

15)

Government of Canada
-
Libraries and Archives
-
Métis inspired Sash Bracelet

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/settlement/kids/021013
-
1811
-
e.html

16)

The
Métis

Sash:
Vid
eo
-
clip on how to make a sash:
http://www.lttacollection.ca/content/lesson
-
plan.asp?SessionId=1205759&ItemId=383&SubjectId=105&Prov
inceId=5

17)

Native Studies: Early Years (K
-
4)
-
A Teachers Resource Book Framework
: Manitoba
Educ
ation and Training. Linda G. McIntosh, Minister).
http://www.edu.gov.mb.ca/k12/abedu/abdocs/K
-
4_framework.pdf

18)

http://www.albertasource.ca/aoe/ui/indexx.aspx?callpage=59&sid=4&zid=2

19)

http://www.saskschools.ca/curr_content/aboriginal_res/

20)

http://www.stf.sk.ca/services/stewart_resources_centre/online_catalogue_unit_plans/inde
x.html

21)

http://www.otc.ca/
TeachingTreaties.htm

22)

http://www.scs.sk.ca/cyber/elem/treaty/2.htm

23)

http://maxweber.hunter.cuny.edu
/pub/eres/EDSPC715_MCINTYRE/CircleOfCourage.ht
ml

24)

Allan Sapp’s Art: Through the Eye of the Cree and Beyond
-

A teachers Resource Guide.
Office of the Treaty Commissioner
-
CD



:




10

UNIT INTRODUCTION ACTIVITY:


Unit: Identity



Topic: Circle of Courage


Subjec
t: Social Studies

Grade: Two



Curriculum Objectives:


Attitudes/Values Objectives

Students will:



appreciate human needs and wants, rights and responsibilities




Activity:




I will introduce my unit on Identity



The students will brainstorm what an iden
tity is



I will read the story “The Moccasin Goalie” by William Roy Brownridge



I will lead a short discussion about the book



I will introduce the students to the model of the Circle of Courage



We will discuss how the four components are related to the story



The students will each get to create a circle of courage that they can colour and then glue
into their journals where they will do a quick write about

what the circle of courage is.

(
They can just write a few describing words)



We will have a closing discu
ssion about how our class will follow the model of the circle
of courage and respect one another.



Assessment & Evaluation
:




I will assess the students on their quick write



I will gage how much the students know about identity from t
his initial class disc
ussion.


Resources:




William Roy Brownridge. (1995). The Moccasin Goalie



http://maxweber.hunter.cuny.edu/pub/eres/
EDSPC715_MCINTYRE/CircleOfCourage.html














11

LESSON ONE



Name:
Tori Staseson


Theme:
Identity



Subject:
Social Studies


Unit:
Heritage


Grade:
Two

Modul
e:
Local Community Then and Now


Foundational Objectives:

Knowledge Objectives

Students will know that:




T
he

community has evolved over time

Skills/Abilities Objectives:

Students will:




Organize

and present information in a Then/Now format

Assessment:



T
he students will be able to recognize that
communities
have been different in the past
and demonstrate this recognition through class discussion



Students will place characteristics of a community in a venn
-
diagram



The students will write in their journal
a
bout the Inuit community from the past and
present

and describe one thing they have in common.


Common Essential Learnings:



Communication
-
class/partner discussions



Critical and Creative Thinking
-
choosing what category to put
community
characteristic
s



Pers
onal and Social Values and Skills
-
The students will

understand how societies
change over time.



Lesson Preparation

Equipment/Materials:




f湵楴⁓瑩汬

J
t物瑴敮⁢y㨠gea湮n⁂畳桥y
㈰ TF



Sticky notes with
community
characteristics



Draw a Venn Diagram on the
board (
Inuit community then, now, or both
)

Advanced Preparation:



Learn more information about aboriginal
life

both in the present and historically


Source:

Idea of comparing Inuit lives then and now came from
a
guided reading question

Instructional Strate
gies:



Whole Group Discussion/Share



Knee
-
To
-
Knee



Sticky Note Connection



Quick Write
-

in journals


Adaptive Dimension
:


12



For those students who have difficulty writing
-

they can have the option to draw pictures
of the schools instead


Presentation

Set:



Introd
uce the students to the book “
f湵楴⁓瑩汬
”.



Ask them what t
hey think the book may be about. A
llow for a few answers.



Read the book.


Development:



After reading the story, ask student to tell me what the book was about (this will help to
assess if the stud
ents understood that it was

comparing
a community

from the past and
present
).



Ask the students to tell me something interesting they learned about this type of
community
.



Have the

students
do a


歮ke
J

J
歮ee


睩瑨⁡湯瑨w爠獴畤r湴⁡湤⁦楮搠i桲ee 睡y猠瑨s猠
c
潭o畮楴y⁩渠 桥⁳瑯 y⁨a猠s桡nge搠潶e爠瑩re
⸠⁇.癥⁴桥⁳瑵摥湴猠愠浩湵瑥n潲⁴o漠o湤n
瑨敮⁨t癥⁴桥洠獨 牥⁴桥 爠楤ra献



Have the students return to their seats.



Provide each desk pair (two students) with one sticky note with a
characteristic that
represents
the community from the past, present, and things that are in common
.



Have pairs decide where their characteristic would fit into the different categories and
then stick their sticky note onto the
Venn Diagram


Closure:



Have a discussion about why each one
belongs in that group.



Have students do a quick write in their journals

about some things they learned from the
story about the Inuit community from the past and present.




















13

Professional Development Plan





Topic:
Instructional Strategies

Date:





Teacher:
Tori Staseson


Observer:
Fiona Smith


1.

Professional Target:




Instructional Strategies


2. Steps to Achieve Target:



For this lesson I plan
on using multiple instructional strategies

including
discussions, “knee
J

J
knee”, “sticky note connection”
ⰠI湤⁡ⁱ畩捫
J
睲楴e.


2.

Instructions for Observer:



Please observe
to see if
the

instructional str
ategies

that I use

are effective for
enhancing student learning
.

4. Data Collection:































14

LESSON TWO



Name:
Tori Staseson


Theme:
Identity


Subject:
Visual Art



Grade:
Two


Learning Objectives:

The students will:



Begin to develop skills that help them depict people and objects accurately.



Become aware of the visual environment and visual art in the daily life of own
comm
unity

Assessment:



Students will be able to create a Métis
-
inspired sash bracelet



Students will recognize that craftwork in the Métis culture is important

Common Essential Learnings:



Communication
-
class discussions



Independent Learning
-
guiding students i
n the development of their art work



Numeracy
-
Have students create patterns


Lesson Preparation

Equipment/Materials:



Resour
ce for sash bracelets:
http://www.collectionsca
nada.gc.ca/settlement/kids/021013
-
1811
-
e.html



Video Resource for the Métis Sash:
http://www.lttacollection.ca/content/lesson
-
plan.asp?SessionId=1205759&ItemId=383&SubjectId=105&ProvinceId=5



“The Fiddle Dancer”
J
t楬晲e搠B畲瑯u



A Métis sash



Coloured wool (re
d, yellow, black, and white)



Scissors



Needle and Thread



One fully made sash bracelet (for demonstration)

Advanced Preparation:



Learn the purposes and background of the Métis sash



Learn how to create sash bracelets.



Create a sash bracelet.

Instructional St
rategies:



Thumbs up/thumbs down



Instructions
-
“too much too fast wont last”



Group Discussions

Adaptive Dimension
:



I will prepare some sash bracelets a head of time for those students who are una
ble to
begin their bracelet and need some help


Technology Enha
nced Learning



Students will watch an aboriginal woman on the computer discuss the uses for sashes.




15

Presentation
:


Set:



I will begin the class by having a Métis sash around my waist. This will engage the
students



I will ask the students what they know a
bout the article of clothing that I am wearing
-
if
they have ever seen one before.



If they do not do so first, I will mention and show illustrations from the book “The
Fiddle Dancer” by Wilfred Burton. This will trigger their prior knowledge because they
桡癥畳 ⁳ e渠桩猠灲pse湴慴楯n



I will lead a discussion by asking questions about the purposes of Métis sashes.


Development:



I will play a video clip of a woman who is of first nations (Ojibwa) who describes some
of the purposes for sash making and shows

different types of sashes and patterns.



After the video is complete I will show the students what they will be making, the sash
bracelet.



I will give step by step instructions to the students.

1.

braid the pieces of each colour of yarn

(I will demonstrate th
is)

2.

Once all four colours are braided sew them together with a needle and thread
(They will need assistance with this)
.

3.

Sew the two ends of the sash, but leave some of the fringe

Closure:



Once the students are complete, or if time is running short explain
to the students that
one tradition that Métis people do with sashes is to give them to a friend. Explain to the
students that after we are finished using our sashes for other lessons they could give it to
someone they care about.





















16


Prof
essional Development Plan




Topic:

Giving Directions

Date:




Teacher:
Tori Staseson

Observer:
Fiona Smith


3.

Professional Targ
et:




Giving Directions


2. Steps to Achieve Target:




Due to the nature of this lesson being one which includes step
-
by
-
step
instructions I need to be very clear with the students and provide them with one
step at a time.



I will first explain all of the st
eps and then repeat step one.



Before proceeding I will have a couple of students repeat to the rest of the class
what the instruction was.

4.

Instructions for Observer:



Please observe the way in which I give directions as well whether or not the
students hav
e an understanding of what they are to be doing.

4. Data Collection:



























17

LESSON THREE



Name:
Tori Staseson


Theme:
Identity


Subject:

Physical Education

Grade:
Two


Foundational Objective

Students will:



Apply movement concepts and principles to the learning and development of movement
patterns and skills.

Learning Objectives:

It is expected that students will:



Demonstrate basic dance
steps and patterns alone and with others



Perform simple movement sequences using
Movement Variables

of Body, Space, Effort
and Relationships, alone and with other
s, with and without equipment

Assessment:




The students will be able to learn dance steps to the “Red River Jig” and will perform
瑨敳t潶敳⁩渠獥煵 湣e.

Common Essential Learnings:



Communication
-
class discussions, listening, asking questions



Independen
t Learning
-
learning the dance steps and sequence of movements



Personal and social values and skills
-
Treat themselves and others with respect


Lesson Preparation

Equipment/Materials:



“Fiddle Dancer” Written by: Wilfred Burton. (book and audio version) Mich
楦i
瑲t湳污瑩潮⁤n湥⁢y⁎潲浡渠m汥畲y



“Jingle Dancer” Written by: Cynthia Leitich Smith



The music of the “Red River Jig”



Métis Sash/Student Sash Bracelets



CD Player

Advanced Preparation:



Practice the dance steps of the Red River Jig

Source
:
Idea inspired
by Wilfred Burton’s presentation in EPS 215

Instructional Strategies:



Audio book/Picture Book



Thumbs up/Thumbs Down



Group Discussion

Adaptive Dimension
:



Some students will not be as rhythmic as others. They will not have to have the exact
jigging steps l
earned
-

as long as they are moving.


18

Technology Enhanced Learning

Technological Literacy
-
students will be listening to the audio version of the “Fiddle
Dancer”



Presentation:

Set:



Begin lesson by reading the book “
g楮i汥

Dancer”



As them what some of the s
imilarities are between the Jingle Dancer and the Fiddle
Dancer




I will then tell the students that today we will be learning some jigging steps


Development:



Take the students to the gymnasium



Show them three basic jigging steps: Chi Galop, Cross Step, an
d Bunny Step



Play the music of the “Red River Jig”



Ask students to listen for the change in the music
-
this is where they should change their
step.



Go through the song while calling out the steps that the students should use.



Have the students get into pair
s and create their own jig step. They will each get to show
the class their step



If there is time teach the students the “Rabbit Dance”


Closure:




Sit down with the students in a big circle and have a discussion about dancing and how
it can represent diff
erent identities and cultures.





















19


Professional Development Plan




Topic:

Classroom Management
Date:



Teacher:
Tori Staseson


Observer:
Fiona Smith


1.

Professional Target:



Classroom Management


2. Steps to Achieve Target:



To ac
hieve classroom management I plan on keeping the students en
gaged in
their learning during the

lesson.



At the beginning of the lesson I will expl
ain to the students that in order to have
a fun experience dancing it is important that we all cooperate with one another.

2.

Instructions for Observer:



Please observe how I explain to the students about how they should behave as
well as the way I handle si
tuations if they arise. Have I planned for classroom
management?

4. Data Collection:




























20

LESSON FOUR



Name:
Tori Staseson


Theme:
Identity


Subject:

Language Arts


Grade:
Two

Foundational Objectives:

Students will:



Learn about and practice the skills and strategies of effective listeners



Write to express thoughts, information, feelings, and experiences in a variety of forms
for

a variety of purpose and audiences

Assessment:



The students will be able to respond to the story and individually create a legend of
“How Chipmunk Got His Stripes”



They will write this legend in their writing journals

Common Essential Learnings:



Communi
cation
-
class discussions, listening, asking questions



Independent Learning
-
writing their own legend



Personal and social values and skills
-
understand that storytelling is a tradition in some
cultures


Lesson Preparation

Equipment/Materials:



“How Chipmunk G
ot His Stripes” Written by: Joseph Bruchac and James Bruchac



“Berry Magic”
J
t物瑴敮⁢yW⁔ 物⁓汯慴⁡湤⁂e瑴y⁈畦u浡m

Advanced Preparation:



Learn background information about aboriginal storytelling and legends

Instructional Strategies:



Think
-
Pair
-
Share



Tur
n and Talk

Adaptive Dimension
:



For the couple of students who have a difficult time writing
-

they can tell me their

prediction and I can help them
with their writing/spelling.


Presentation:

Set:



Begin lesson by reading the first half of the legend “How

Chipmunk Got His Stripes”


Development:



Have students do a turn and talk about what they think might happen in the rest of the
story.



Ask students if they know what legends are



Explain to students that legends are used to tell stories and that lots of cul
tures use
storytelling as a way of learning how things came to be.


21



Explain to the students that today we will be writing our own legend about how
chipmunk got his stripes.



Have the students return to their seats. Have the students do a think
-

pair
-

share
about
how they think chipmunk got his stripes.



Have the students write in their writing journals their story. Provide a writing prompt on
the board for the students to begin their story (ex) Chipmunk got his stripes by…



Explain to the students that their s
tory must have at least four sentences



When the students finish their stories they are welcome to draw a picture to illustrate it.



Ask the students if any of them would like to share their story with the rest of the class.



Once this is finished have the
re
turn to the floor

and finish reading them the second half
of the story.


Closure:



Ask the students if their stories were similar or different to this version of the story.



Ask the students why they think storytelling is important in some cultures. Explain

to
the students that it is how some people traditionally learned. In some cultures elders tell
legends to educate the children.































22



Professional Development Plan





Topic:

Indirect Instruction

Date:



Teacher:
Tori Staseson

Observer:
Fiona Smith


3.

Professional Target:



Indirect Instruction

2. Steps to Achieve Target:



I will guide students learning alth
ough I will not provide them with answers
immediately



I will allow the students to compose their own stories

4.

Instructions for Observer:



Please observe the way
s

in which I
allow the students to
learn through different
methods of discussion with their peer
s
.

4. Data Collection:






























23



LESSON FIVE



Name:
Tori Staseson


Theme:
Identity


Subject:

Health
-
Nutrition

Grade:
Two

Foundat
ional Objective



Students will act on their knowledge about maintaining or improving their health

Assessment:



I will assess the student on their presentation of their meal that they brought for the
potluck
-
describing what it is and the food group it may be
long to



I will assess the students knowledge of the four food groups that were present in our
potluck from a picture they draw
-
labeling the groups

Common Essential Learnings:



Communication
-
Students will be giving and receiving instructions regarding the
baking


-
Students will discuss with the class what type of food they brought



Numeracy
-

The students will measure out the ingredients

Lesson Preparation

Equipment/Materials:



“Fiddle Dancer” Written by: Wilfred Burton



Recipe/I
ngredients for Bannock.

Advanced Preparation:



I will write a letter home to the parents describing the class potluck



Prepare the ingredients for the Bannock

Instructional Strategies:



Class share
-
students will share what they have brought for their meals

Adaptive Dimension
:



All students will have a chance to participate in making the Bannock



Students have the option of presenting their cultural food
-
if they do not want to
explain
what they brought to the whole class
they can just tell me instead.


Present
ation:

Set:



I will read a portion of the book “Fiddle Dancer” to the students



This will activate their prior knowledge about what Bannock is.


Development:



I will lead the students into the
science/arts room



I will
have the group stand around a large table

where one by one the students will
prepare the bannock.



Everyone in the group will take turns participating in the making of the bannock



Once the bannock has been put into the oven
-

we will clean up and head back to class.



24

Closure:



The students and I wil
l discuss what food group bannock fits into and then begin to
prepare for the potluck.



Once the bannock is finished being cooked, I will serve the bannock
, and

the students
can enjoy it as well as the other cultural foods they have all brought
.











































25






Professional Development Plan




Topic:

Giving Directions
Date:




Teacher:
Tori Staseson

Ob
server:
Fiona Smith


5.

Professional Target:



Giving Directions

2. Steps to Achieve Target:



I will give the students step by step directions on how to make the dough for the
bannock



I will make sure they understand by having a student from
the

group repeat
the
instructions I have given.

6.

Instructions for Observer:



Please observe the ways in which I give the students directions


4. Data Collection:




























26

UNIT
CLOSING

ACTIVITY:


Unit: Identity



Topic: Circle of Courage


Subject: Social S
tudies

Grade: Two



Curriculum Objectives:


Attitudes/Values Objectives

Students will:



appreciate human needs and wants, rights and responsibilities


Activity:



I will lead a class discussion about what they have learned about identity within this unit



T
he students will create a picture on a blank circle model about their own identity. They
will draw/write things that represent who they are.



After they have finished their pictures/writing the students can share with one another
some of the things that the
y drew to represent themselves.



We will have a final discussion about everyone in the world has a different personal
identity and how we must respect one another regardless of our differences.



The students will do a self
-
evaluation on their learning throug
hout the unit


Assessment & Evaluation:




I will assess the students on the knowledge they have gained from the unit based upon the
class discussion



I will assess the students on their drawings/writings about their identity
-
did they get the
actual meaning a
bout what they have been learning about?



27







UNIT RUBRIC


Student name:

Date:

Grade:
Two

Unit:

Identity


3



The student completed all of his/her journal entries



The student was able to create a
well thought out prediction to
a story



The student was able to describe the food group that their meal
belonged to with no hesitation



The student participated in class discussions/activities
regularly


2



The student completed most of his/her journal entrie
s



The student was able to create a prediction to a story



The student was able to describe the food group that their meal
belonged to with little hesitation



The stud
ent participated in class
discussions/activities
frequently


1



The student did not complete

any of his/her journal entries



The student did not complete his/her prediction to the story



The student described the food group that their meal belonged
to with much hesitation



The student participated in
class
discussions/activities
occasionally



28

Self
-
Assessment


Name: Date:


Grade:
Two

Unit: Identity







I completed all of my journal entries (3)



I completed most of my journal entries(2)



I did not complete any of my journ
al entries(1)





I was able to make an excellent prediction to a story(3)



I was able to make a good prediction to a story(2)



I did not complete my prediction to the story(1)





It was really easy to describe the food group that my
meal belonged to (3)



It was

kind of easy to describe the food group that my
meal belonged to.(2)



It was hard to describe the food group that my meal
belonged to(1)




I participated in all discussions and activities(3)



I participated in most discussions and activities(2)



I did not par
ticipated very much in discussion and
activities(1)


MY SCORE: /12


29

MY WRITING
JOURNAL







NAME:_________________________




30

Journal #1:


An identity is…

_______________________________
_______________________________
____________________________
___
_______________________________
_______________________________
_______________________________
_______________________________
_______________________________

*Draw a picture that shows a part of
your identity*









31

Journal #2:


The Circle of Courage is…

_______________________________
_______________________________
_______________________________
_______________________________
_______________________________
_______________________________
_______________________________
_______________________________










32

Journal #3:

Inuit Life in the Past:

_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________






Inuit Life in the Present:

_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________






Similarities:

_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________


33


How

D
id
Chipmunk G
et

H
is
S
tripes?




WRITTEN BY:_________________


34

Once upon a time…

_
____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
___________________________________
__
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
________________________________
_____
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
_____________________________
________
______________
_______________________


35

My Favorite Foods




My favorite food is _________.




It belongs to the ____________
food group.




My favorite food that I
tasted/brought today was
____________.




It belongs to the ____________

food group



36

What m
akes up your identity?
_______________________________
_______________________________
_______________________________
_______________________________
_______________________________
_______________________________


Why is it important to learn about
other peop
les identities?

_______________________________
_______________________________
_______________________________
_______________________________
_______________________________
_______________________________