LabVIEW Image Processing

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6 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 7 μήνες)

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LabVIEW Image Processing

McGraw Hill Initial
Pitch

LabVIEW Image Processing

A Proposed Text


Prospectus


1.

Brief Description


The proposed text fills a hole in LabVIEW technical publication range, and is aimed
toward competent LabVIEW Users with all levels of LabVIEW "Vision" knowledge. The
book covers intr
oductions, and theory of general image acquisition and processing topics,
whilst providing more in depth discussion and examples of specific NI Vision based tools.


I suggest that the text could also be used as a general training manual and a reference
for

more experienced Vision programmers. The text is not a “laboratory
-
style” book, and
hence does not contain exercises for the reader to complete. Instead, the book refers to
several examples (with each example’s code provided on an accompanying CD
-
ROM).



2.

Outstanding Features


The core outstanding feature of the text is that it will be a comprehensive IMAQ and
Vision resource, combining reference material, theory on image processing techniques,
information on how LabVIEW and NI Vision handle each techniq
ues, examples of each of
their uses, and real world user case studies, all in one book.


A particularly valuable resource that must be included with the book is a CD
-
ROM
with example code, as referenced in the text. If National Instruments agrees, several

of their
technical Application Notes or “white papers” should also be included, as well as
demonstration versions of LabVIEW, NI
-
IMAQ, the IMAQ Vision Builder and IMAQ
Vision (if such demonstration packages exist for the latter two), to allow the readers
to
execute and modify the accompanying code on the CD
-
ROM.



3.

Competition


Several other resources compete with particular areas of the proposed text, although
they have all been produced by National Instruments, and are in the public domain.


I believe the

largest competition to the text is the
NI Vision Online Tutorials
. These
tutorials contain links to very useful example co
de (some of which I would suggest are also
referenced in the book). The technical presentations lack depth into the theory of how the
Vision components work, and creating more complex code. Also, only a small range of the
LabVIEW Image Processing

McGraw Hill Initial
Pitch

available NI Vision components a
re covered, thus they serve as a general introductory
resource, with limited reference value.



Another resource that I would believe might compete with the book is the NI IMAQ
Vision Example VI Library, which is optionally installed with the Vision packag
e. This
“local on
-
line” resource, although more directly technically appealing than the NI Vision
Online Tutorials, provides few step
-
by
-
step instructions


it describes the individual
components in a highly technical manner, with little instruction on us
ing the components
together to build a useable system.



The NI Vision Builder Software, although not really a competitor to the proposed
book, could be an excellent partner to it, as it is an excellent tool for users new to NI Vision
development to build
image acquisition and processing applications. Perhaps a shareware
trial version could be included on the book’s CD
-
ROM.



4.

Apparatus


As suggested above, the book will include an example for each topic covered (often one
example will combine coding techni
ques for several topics, and it may be of more value to
include them together)


these examples will be explained thoroughly in he book using
screen shots of front panels and wiring diagrams (if applicable), and will also be in *.vi or
*.llb format on the
CD
-
ROM. Several other items will be included on the CD
-
ROM (as
outlined in the “Outstanding Features” section above)


A glossary will be included toward the end of the book to define subject
-
related words
and acronyms, as will a table of references at the

conclusion of each chapter.


I propose that the format and general layout of the book be the same as the others in the
series, as to continue the synergy of the other texts.



5.

Level


The book is intended for competent LabVIEW programmers, as a general tra
ining manual
for those new to NI Vision application development, and a reference for more experienced
Vision programmers. It is assumed that readers have attained programming knowledge
comparable to that taught in the National Instruments
LabVIEW Basics I course
.


The book’s style is descriptive, both elementary and rigorous (depending on the specific
topic covered), and is more tutorial than encyclopedic.



6.

Market Considerations


LabVIEW Image Processing

McGraw Hill Initial
Pitch

In all ho
nesty, I am unsure of several of the market considerations of publishing this book,
but I believe that that its first year sales would be comparable to the other titles that cover
various LabVIEW subjects, including those in the PHPTR V
irtual Instrumentati
on Series
.


I believe that the majority share of market sales for this title will be to industrial and research
companies, and individual consumers. This market is both US based and international,
although as the technological acceptance of industrial aut
omation is at its highest in the
former, the international market may not be as fruitful.


Although National Instruments training courses, including
Machine Vision and Image
Processing

ha
ve their own training manuals, I believe that the book could be noted as
suggested further reading, thus promoting the book to a proven interested audience.


As NI Vision becomes more widely used in the automation sector, this book would be
particularly us
eful to university and college libraries, and may be potentially useful as a text
for students.



7.

Status of the Book


The book is yet to be written


all that exists of it is the Outline attached. I believe the
manuscript could be finished within between
four and five months of your initial acceptance
to publish. This time frame may depend on several perturbations, the most important being
the availability of new hardware and software referenced in the book (if something new
comes out, it may be better to

delay the launch by a week, as opposed to the book being
partially dated before its release). This problem should be minimal, as my local National
Instruments Area Sales Manager, Jeremy Carter (email
jeremy.carter@ni.co
m
) has indicated
his support for this project, and is willing to provide information on hardware and software
that is planned for release, and to provide beta versions of them for my use during the
writing of the book.


I estimate the book’s length to be
approximately 300 to 400 pages in total. The text will be
exclusively in US English (as I believe that this is the biggest market base), and will include
a high number of screenshots (most in grayscale, although several will need to be in full
color to co
mprehensively demonstrate the techniques covered). Code “listings” will be
included (both within the text, and referenced to the CD
-
ROM), written in G (LabVIEW)
6.0.2 (as I believe the use of 6.1 will not be particularly widespread initially), using the N
I
Vision Toolkit 6.0.


The book will be prepared using Microsoft Word 2000, with pictures created using Jasc’s
Paint Shop Pro 6.02 (the format of the images is your choice


I tend to use the Portable
Network Graphics (*.png) format, as it supports up to 2
4
-
bit color and uses lossless
compression).


LabVIEW Image Processing

McGraw Hill Initial
Pitch


8.

Suggested Reviewers


Academic Market Base


Dr. Walter Kalceff


Senior Lecturer


Department of Applied Physics


Faculty of Science


University of Technology, Sydney


P.O. Box 123


Broadway NSW 2007


AUSTRAL
IA



Email:
walter.kalceff@uts.edu.au


Telephone: +61 2 9514 2191


Fax: +61 2 9514 2219



National Instruments Staff

Mr. Jeremy Carter

Area Sales Manager

National Instruments


P.O. Box 382


North Ryde NSW

2113


AUSTRALIA



Email:
jeremy.carter@ni.com


Telephone: +61 2 9672 8846


Fax: +61 2 9676 3428




LabVIEW Image Processing

McGraw Hill Initial
Pitch

Table of Contents


Proposed Outline


Preface


Introduction


Objectives


Organisation of the Book


Acknowledgm
ents


About the Author


Introduction


Initial Setup


Overview


Choosing Your Software



NI
-
IMAQ



Default Vision Software



The Vision Toolkit


Choosing Your Hardware



Cameras




PAL




RS
-
170




NTSC




LineScan




AreaScan




CameraLink




Digital



Ima
ge Acquisition Cards (frame grabbers)



Lighting


Installing Your Hardware



Physical Connections



Recognising Your Hardware (NI
-
IMAQ)


Still Acquisition


Overview


Calibrating Your System


Acquiring a Still Image



Acquisition Types




Snap




Grab



Usi
ng Still Colour


Triggering and Occurrences


Sequence Acquisition


Overview


Calibrating Your System


Acquiring a Sequence



Acquisition Types

Performing Real
-
time Image Acquisition

Streaming to Disk

LabVIEW Image Processing

McGraw Hill Initial
Pitch


Calculating Realistic Data Rates


Displaying Images


Ov
erview


Simple Display Techniques


Displaying Images on Your Front Panel


The IMAQ Tools Palette


Using the Vision Browser


Overlay Tools


Image Processing


Overview


Image Management


The ROI (Region of Interest)



Simple ROI Use



Multiple ROIs


Basic O
perators



Add (Combine) and Subtract (Difference) Two Images



Comparing Two Images



Using Image Averaging to Improve the Signal/Noise Ratio of Images



Other Tools (Symmetry, Rotate, Unwrap, 3D View, etc)


Threshold and Equalisation

Filters


Using Pre
-
d
efined Filters


Creating Your Own Filter


Common Filters



Edge Detection




Specific Angles




Multiple Angles



Low Pass



More?



Other Filter Designs Available on the Web


Morphology


Distance Contouring


Filling Particle Holes


Border Rejection


Parti
cle Removal


Finding and Classifying Circular Particles


Particle Separation


Advanced Particle Filtering


Image Analysis


Overview


Blob Analysis


Searching and Recognition


Pixel Manipulation (Greyscale and Colour)


Mathematical Manipulation of Image Col
umns and Arrays

Histograms

Intensity Profiles

LabVIEW Image Processing

McGraw Hill Initial
Pitch


Point


Line


ROI

Basic Particle Measurements


Counting Particles


Particle Areas


Particle Positions


Spacing Measurements

Complex Particle Measurements

Feature Edge Location

Shape and Pattern Matching

Analyti
cal Geometry

Using the Analytical Geometry Tools


Machine Vision


Overview


Optical Character Recognition


Reading Physical Instrument Displays



LCDs



Analog Meters



Barcodes


Vision File Management


Overview


Still Image File Manipulation



File Types



Data Compression and Encoding Techniques



Reading an Image File



Writing to an Image File


Vision Applications and Solutions


Overview


A few stories from LabVIEW Users


Bibliography

Glossary

Index


CD
-
ROM