Management Guidelines - Professional Learning

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5 Φεβ 2013 (πριν από 4 χρόνια και 9 μήνες)

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Nuts and Bolts of Classroom
Management

Area 6 Lead Teachers

Michelle Curry

Patrice Jones

Shauntice Bryant

Agenda


The Expert Teaching Quiz


Think/Pair/Share


14 Things That Matters Most


Classroom Management


Gallery Walk


Ticket Out the Door


"What Great Teachers Do
Differently"
-

Whitaker, T.

14 Things That Matter Most


1.

Great teachers never forget that it
is
people
, not
programs

that
determine the quality of a school.



2.

Great teachers establish clear
expectations

at the start of the year
and follow them consistently as the
year progresses.


"What Great Teachers Do
Differently"
-

Whitaker, T.

14 Things That Matter Most


3.

When a student misbehaves, great
teachers have one goal: to keep that
behavior from
happening again
.



4. Great teachers have high
expectations

for their students, but
even higher
expectations

for
themselves.

"What Great Teachers Do
Differently"
-

Whitaker, T.

14 Things That Matter Most



5. Great teachers know who is the
variable in their classroom:
they are
.


Good teachers consistently strive to
improve

and they focus on something
they can control
-
their own
performance
.

"What Great Teachers Do
Differently"
-

Whitaker, T.

14 Things That Matter Most


6. Great teachers create a
positive

atmosphere in their classrooms and
schools. They treat every person with
respect
. In particular, they
understand the power of
praise
.



7. Great teachers consistently filter
out the
negatives

that don’t matter
and share a
positive

attitude.

"What Great Teachers Do
Differently"
-

Whitaker, T.

14 Things That Matter Most


8. Great teachers work hard to keep their
relationships in good
repair



to avoid
personal hurt and to
repair

any possible
damage.



9. Great teachers have the ability to ignore
trivial
disturbances

and the ability to
respond to inappropriate
behavior

without
escalating the situation.

"What Great Teachers Do
Differently"
-

Whitaker, T.

14 Things That Matter Most



10. Great teachers have a
plan

and
purpose

for everything that they do.
If things don’t work out the way they
had envisioned, they
reflect

on what
they could have done differently and
adjust

their plans accordingly.

"What Great Teachers Do
Differently"
-

Whitaker, T.

14 Things That Matter Most


11. Before making any decisions or
attempting to bring about any change,
great teachers ask themselves one central
question: What will the
best

people think?



12. Great teachers continually ask
themselves who is most
comfortable

and
who is least
comfortable

with each decision
that they make. They treat everyone as if
they were good.

"What Great Teachers Do
Differently"
-

Whitaker, T.

14 Things That Matter Most


13. Great teachers keep standardized
testing in perspective; they center on the
real issue of
student learning
.



14. Great teachers care about their
students. They understand that behaviors
and beliefs are tied to
emotion
, and they
understand the power of
emotion

to jump
-
start change.

Classroom Management

Essential Question:


How does effective classroom
management foster student learning
?

Why is it Needed?






Student achievement

at the end of the year is
directly related to the degree to which the teacher
establishes good control of classroom procedures
in the very first week of school year.





-

Wong 1998

What’s Your Belief?



“It’s not my job to discipline.”


“I’m here to teach.”


“In my day….”


“That kid is just bad.”


“He’ll never change.”

Guidelines for Every

Behavior Management System

1.
Be Consistent!!!!


2. Ignore to a certain extent
inappropriate behavior


3. Praise appropriate behavior


4. Model Respect

Management Guidelines

5.
Determine your philosophy


6. State your expectations


7. Showcase clearly defined rules


8. Involve students in decision making











Management Guidelines

9. Emphasize action


10. Set Procedures


11. Be a doer not a talker!




Behavior Management Truth





Reacting to a problem generally
escalates

the problem, while
being proactive usually helps to
de
-
escalate

or avoid the problem
in the first place
.


Reacting


What do the following common teacher
reactions accomplish?


Yelling


Arguing with students


Criticizing the student


Throwing students out of the room



Student’s behavior are generally NOT
personal, but we often take it
personally.


Reacting



If it IS personal, aren’t we the grown
-
up
in the situation?



Reaction interprets and acts upon the
problem as a personal attack.



Proactive people view the situation as a
problem to solve.



Adopt a collaborative approach

Creating a Peaceful Classroom


Have a genuine interest in your students



Communicate classrooms rules clearly



Be objective, not judgmental

Creating a Peaceful Classroom


Show that you are human



Address problem behavior directly and
immediately



CHAOS begets CHAOS


Shaping Students Actions


Give directions only when you have the
attention of all your students



Move around your classroom as you
teach.



Always take the time to compliment
those in class who are attentive and
following directions

Shaping Students Actions


Follow through on anything you will do


whether positive or negative.



Nothing is more important than keeping
your students attentive and focused
during the school day.



Rules in your classroom are not to be
broken.


Parents


Make a
POSITIVE

contact with the
parent or guardian early in the year
BEFORE

any problem arise.



When talking with parents about a
discipline problem, focus on the
behaviors that need to be addressed.




Enlist the parent’s help and expertise in
solving the problem.

Parents


Parents can be allies or enemies



Our approach toward them and their
child creates an ally or an enemy,
REGARDLESS

of the guilt or
innocence of their child.

Ticket Out the Door

On the index card answer the essential
question:


How does effective classroom
management foster student learning?



Coming Soon

A Framework for Understanding
Poverty

By: Ruby K. Payne, Ph.D.