Animation Projectx - Missallgar-iteach.org

bouncerarcheryΤεχνίτη Νοημοσύνη και Ρομποτική

14 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 6 μήνες)

97 εμφανίσεις


Think

Pair

Share

What are the
two
different
types of
animation?


Stop
-
Motion


Computer generated


Working with the person next to you, write
a
definition

of animation.


You
cannot

use any resources (dictionary, Internet,
etc
).


You must come up with the definition
by yourselves
.


You will be sharing your definition with the rest
of the class.


Write your definition in your notes.


Animation is the art of creating a series of
images that create the appearance of movement
when played in rapid succession over time.


Movement

makes static drawings come alive.


It is the
quality of the movement

(the life)
that matters, not the quality of a particular
image or drawing or frame of film.


Whether it is a drawing or a lump of clay, the
animator places
life

and
meaning

into the
material by making it
move
!



Computer
-
generated imagery (CGI) is the
application of computer graphics to create
or contribute to images in art, printed
media, video games, films, television
programs, commercials, simulators and
simulation generally.


The
visual scenes may be dynamic or
static, and may be 2D or 3D, though the
term "CGI" is most commonly used to refer
to 3D computer graphics used for creating
scenes or special effects in films and
television.



A fascination with the way things
move
.


Sharp
observational

skills


A willingness to be an
actor
!


Problem solving

skills


Lots of
patience


A little bit of
perseverance
!



http
://
www.youtube.com/watch?v=LzZwiLUVaKg&fea
ture=related


http
://
www.youtube.com/watch?v=fSXhoCCggB8



Who made the first animation?


When was the first animation created?


How were the early animations made?


What was the first 3D computer
-
generated
animation?


What is CGI?



Stop
-
motion


Computer
animation


CGI


Flash


3D/ 2D


Mesh


Skeletons


Keyframing


Tweening


Rig


Mesh


Think

Pair

Share

Where is
animation used?


Children’s cartoons,


Films


Gaming


Architecture


Medical simulations



Create a short video of between 1 and 2 minutes that
shows the
history of animation or the timeline
of CGI
in the movies.



The video must include:



Definition
of:
Animation and ‘what
is CGI’


A
ppropriate
images


Text that provides information


Interesting transitions


Titles, subtitles and credits



Stop motion (also known as stop frame) is an animation technique to make a physically manipulated object appear to
move on its own. The object is moved in small increments between individually photographed frames, creating the
illusion of movement when the series of frames is played as a continuous sequence. Dolls with movable joints or
clay figures are often used in stop motion for their ease of repositioning. Stop motion animation using
plasticine

is called clay animation or "
clay
-
motion
". Not all stop motion requires figures or models; many stop motion films
can involve using humans, household appliances and other things for comedic effect
.


Stop motion animation utilises this incremental change process in its own special way. Traditionally a movie film
camera was started and stopped, one frame at a time.

While the camera was stopped an animator would adjust the figure or object the camera was pointing at. The camera
would film another frame
-

this would continue until all the animation was filmed


Stop motion animation can be thought of as just a series of still photographs. Objects or puppets are moved and
filmed frame by frame to simulate movement. Films like the original King Kong and Star Wars made heavy use of stop
motion animation using miniatures and puppets. This was the only way to bring objects that cannot move by
themselves to life on screen.


The advent of computer generated imagery has removed stop motion animation from the mainstream but its unique
effect and the realistic textures it brings (since actual materials are used in filming) means it will not die out
anytime soon. It is still widely used in artistic films, shorts, and commercials.


Notable feature
-
length films all done in stop motion animation and released in the “CGI boom era” are:



Tim Burton’s Corpse Bride (2005)


Chicken Run (2000)


Wallace &
Gromit
: The Curse of the Were
-
Rabbit (2005)


Coraline

(2009)


Its
low entry price, and still unique "look" and "feel" on film means stop motion is still used on some projects
such as in children's programming, as well as in commercials and comic shows such as Robot Chicken. The argument
that the textures achieved with CGI cannot match the way real textures are captured by stop motion also makes it
valuable for a handful of movie makers, notably Tim Burton, whose puppet
-
animated film Corpse Bride was released in
2005
.



Computer animation is the process used for generating animated images by using computer graphics. The more general
term computer generated imagery encompasses both static scenes and dynamic images, while computer animation only
refers to moving images.



Modern computer animation usually uses 3D computer graphics, although 2D computer graphics are still used for
stylistic, low bandwidth, and faster real
-
time renderings. Sometimes the target of the animation is the computer
itself, but sometimes the target is another medium, such as film.



Computer animation is essentially a digital successor to the stop motion techniques used in traditional animation
with 3D models and frame
-
by
-
frame animation of 2D illustrations. Computer generated animations are more
controllable than other more physically based processes, such as constructing miniatures for effects shots or
hiring extras for crowd scenes, and because it allows the creation of images that would not be feasible using any
other technology. It can also allow a single graphic artist to produce such content without the use of actors,
expensive set pieces, or props.



To create the illusion of movement, an image is displayed on the computer screen and repeatedly replaced by a new
image that is similar to it, but advanced slightly in time (usually at a rate of 24 or 30 frames/second). This
technique is identical to how the illusion of movement is achieved with television and motion pictures.



For 3D animations, objects (models) are built on the computer monitor (modelled) and 3D figures are rigged with a
virtual skeleton. For 2D figure animations, separate objects (illustrations) and separate transparent layers are
used, with or without a virtual skeleton. Then the limbs, eyes, mouth, clothes, etc. of the figure are moved by the
animator on key frames. The differences in appearance between key frames are automatically calculated by the
computer in a process known as tweening or morphing. Finally, the animation is rendered.



For 3D animations, all frames must be rendered after modelling is complete. For 2D vector animations, the rendering
process is the key frame illustration process, while tweened frames are rendered as needed. For pre
-
recorded
presentations, the rendered frames are transferred to a different format or medium such as film or digital video.
The frames may also be rendered in real time as they are presented to the end
-
user audience. Low bandwidth
animations transmitted via the internet (e.g. 2D Flash, X3D) often use software on the end
-
users computer to render
in real time as an alternative to streaming or pre
-
loaded high bandwidth animations.


Computer
-
generated imagery (CGI) is the application of computer graphics to create or contribute to images in art,
printed media, video games, films, television programs, commercials, simulators and simulation generally. The
visual scenes may be dynamic or static, and may be 2D or 3D, though the term "CGI" is most commonly used to refer
to 3D computer graphics used for creating scenes or special effects in films and television.



The term computer animation refers to dynamic CGI rendered as a movie. The term virtual world refers to agent
-
based, interactive environments.



Computer graphics software is used to make computer
-
generated imagery for movies, etc. Recent availability of CGI
software and increased computer speeds have allowed individual artists and small companies to produce professional
-
grade films, games, and fine art from their home computers. This has brought about an internet subculture with its
own set of global celebrities, clichés, and technical vocabulary.


Not only do animated images form part of computer
-
generated imagery, natural looking landscapes, such as fractal
landscapes are also generated via computer algorithms. Modern architects use services from computer graphic firms
to create 3
-
dimensional models for both customers and builders. These computer generated models can be more
accurate than traditional drawings. Computer generated models used in skeletal animation are not always
anatomically correct, however, organizations such as the Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute have developed
anatomically correct computer
-
based models.


While computer generated images of landscapes may be static, the term computer animation only applies to dynamic
images that resemble a movie. However, in general the term computer animation refers to dynamic images that do not
allow user interaction, and the term virtual world is used for the interactive animated environments.



Computer animation is essentially a digital successor to the art of stop motion animation of 3D models and frame
-
by
-
frame animation of 2D illustrations. Computer generated animations are more controllable than other more
physically based processes, such as constructing miniatures for effects shots or hiring extras for crowd scenes,
and because it allows the creation of images that would not be feasible using any other technology. It can also
allow a single graphic artist to produce such content without the use of actors, expensive set pieces, or props.



To create the illusion of movement, an image is displayed on the computer screen and repeatedly replaced by a new
image that is similar to the previous image, but advanced slightly in the time domain (usually at a rate of 24 or
30 frames/second). This technique is identical to how the illusion of movement is achieved with television and
motion pictures.



The uncanny valley is a hypothesis in the field of robotics[1] and 3D computer animation,[2][3] which holds that
when human replicas look and act almost, but not perfectly, like actual human beings, it causes a response of
revulsion among human observers. The "valley" refers to the dip in a graph of the comfort level of humans as a
function of a robot's human likeness
.


Mori's original hypothesis states that as the appearance of a robot is made more human, a human observer's
emotional response to the robot will become increasingly positive and empathic, until a point is reached beyond
which the response quickly becomes that of strong revulsion. However, as the robot's appearance continues to become
less distinguishable from that of a human being, the emotional response becomes positive once more and approaches
human
-
to
-
human empathy levels.



This area of repulsive response aroused by a robot with appearance and motion between a "barely human" and "fully
human" entity is called the uncanny valley. The name captures the idea that an almost human
-
looking robot will seem
overly "strange" to a human being, will produce a feeling of
uncanniness
, and will thus fail to evoke the empathic
response required for productive human
-
robot interaction



Stop
-
motion


Button Moon

/
Flumps


Computer animation


SIGGRAPH 2008 Computer
Animation Festival Preview


CGI


Avatar
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SzPeMSn7MGw


Uncanny valley
-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNdAIPoh8a4





You
will be creating a 1 min animation to be shown on children’s TV
and popular children’s websites. These short animations will be used
to inform young people know about one of the following topics:


E
-
safety


The benefits of healthy lifestyles and
exercise


Eco
-
friendly homes and
lifestyles


Climate
change


History of
gaming


Use of ICT in sports
education


Artificial Intelligence (AI
)


Charity Work (Support Materials Available
)


Role of technology in health care







Plan
characters and a short
-
animation using
mind maps and storyboards


Create 2D and 3D characters for your animation


Create a short
-
animation


Use a range of software for this task:
Fireworks, Photoshop & Flash


Present and evaluate your work


Enter your animation to the
ANIMATION 13

competition





Time is short


you have 8 weeks to complete
this assignment.



Charity
1:
The
Prince's Trust

is a youth
charity that helps change young lives
.



Charity
2:
UNICEF

is the world's leading
children's charity protecting the rights of
children and young people
.




Charity
3:
Help
for Heroes

is a charity formed
to help those who have been wounded in
Britain's current conflicts.






Mood boards


Rough sketches of one or more
graphics for your animation


Annotated storyboards


Feedback from a classmate to improve
your concept design


Theme:


Space


futuristic
-

Mars


Earth


Mountains


Grand Canyon National
Park


Urban


graffiti


skateboarding


street


http://www.graffiticreator.net/


Colours


Tools and graphical effects


Typeface (i.e. Scores)



Audience and Purpose


Use of colour


Use of bitmap and vector tools


Graphical effects


File type


Size


Resolution



In general web file resolution is 72 dpi, or dots per inch.


Print work requires at least 300 dpi resolution for photo
images. These files can be rather large in file size.



Fill Effect

Font Style

Stoke
Colour

#FF6992

Fill Effect

Space
Invader

Fill Colour

#FF5722

http://www.mega80s.com/

http://www.mega80s.com/

http://www.mega80s.com/

Fill Effect:

Shape Edge:
Feather (3)

Shape fill:
Gradient Ellipse

Colours:
#9933CC
(purple) #E70CF3 (pink)
#3333CC(blue)


Color Schemes Picker


http://wellstyled.com/tools/colorscheme2/index
-
en.html



All


Create at least 6 scenes


Basic drawings and some notes


Level 3/ 4



Most


Develop scenes and story



Level 5


Describe what will happen in the scenes, different
animation effects, and sounds


Some






Level 6/7


Detailed storyboards suitable for purpose and
audience


Sound
effects/Music

Speech

Characters

Describe
animation effects


fade, rotate,
facial expressions

Plot/

Story


http://animation.about.com/
od/flashanimationtutorials/
ss/flashlesson5_2.htm



missallgar
-
iteach.org


All







Level
3/
4


Use layers, key frames and drawing tools


Use a movie clip


C
hange colours and effects


At least one shape tween effect



Most







Level
5


Use more than one shape tween animation


Some







Level 6/7



know the difference between motion and shape
tweening effects



All







Level
3/
4


Create at least 3 symbols in the library


Add a background to your stage


Use brush tool and change colours



Most







Level
5


Use a range of tools (including brush, spray can, pen tool,
bucket tool)



Some







Level 6/7


Tracing images using the pen tool


All







Level
3/
4


Create at least 3 symbols in the library


Add a background to your stage


Add symbols to the timeline using frame
-
by
-
frame animation


Use Onion skin


Most







Level
5


Create frame
-
by
-
frame animated faces or changing shapes/legs/arms


Classic Tweening

effects



Changing backgrounds and scenes


Sound effects/music



Some







Level 6/7


Advanced animation effects


fade effects and use the bone tool


Synchronising sound effects


All







Level
3/
4

Identify some good points and at least one improvement on the animation
and presentation



Most







Level
5


Identify a range of good points and areas for improvement



Some







Level 6/7


Complete both a self
-
evaluation and peer
-
review



Find an image of a celebrity to trace


it's important to
remember that
most
motion happens
through rotation at
pivot points

rather
than through
vertical or
horizontal
movement. Limbs
move in arcs.



Go to INSERT>NEW SYMBOL


as a movie clip and
give it a suitable name


At
this point we'll need to
IMPORT the
photoshop

file into Flash to the stage so that
all
of the parts into Flash
are as
separate
pieces
.


Or you can create your drawing in Flash


It's very important to break your facial
features down into separate files.



Select the different parts


Modify
-
>Trace
Bitmap


To move different parts you can anchor points
using the bone tool.


This is a way of giving your character a
skeleton


Bone Tool


When you have finished making your character


Select all Layers using Ctrl key and click to
select all layers


Right click and cut all layers


Click on INSERT> NEW Symbol


as a movie clip


give it a suitable name


Paste all layers on to the timeline


You now have a copy in your library






See Tutorial


When using the bone
tool to animate



Right click on frame
and Insert Pose


Then Move into next
position


Go to findsounds.com and save a sound file by
right
-
clicking on download icon


Record your voice by using AUDACITY software


remember to save your file as a wave file


Add music


go to x
-
drive>ICT>Media files



See Tutorial

1)
Insert > New Symbol

2)
Add layers for all the different parts of
the character

3)
Draw the different parts on the correct
layer


Then animate the different parts of the
character using :


Shape tween


Motion tween & fading you must convert to a
movie clip using Convert to Symbol>Movie Clip


1.
Export animation from Flash

2.
Open
MovieMaker

and import movie

3.
Drag and drop movie clips on to the timeline

4.
Add Titles and Credits

5.
Finish Movie and Save to Computer



Complete Animation Presentation


Frames


Frame rate


Keyframe


Movie clips


Motion
Tweening


Shape
Tweening


Skeleton




Photoshop

Flash

Bone Tool

Timeline

KeyFrame

Pen Tool

Pose

Bitmap

Tracing

Motion Tween

Vector




Pen

Tool


Layers







Fill Colour




Outline

Colour



Eyedropper

Tool



Hide Layers




Pen Tool
-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_em
bedded&v=6VgY6v8iTvk


Help file:
http://www.entheosweb.com/fireworks/tracing.as
p



Find a image
from the internet

Paste the image into
Fireworks

Using the pen tool
trace around
different parts of
the image

Use LAYERS to see
all the different
parts


check the
order

S
elect paths and fill with colour/
apply gradients/textures and
patterns

Select all the paths and go
to modify> combine paths


Pen

Tool


Layers








Paint

Bucket Tool






Eyedropper

Tool





Find a image
from the internet

Paste the image into
Flash


Insert
new
symbol

Using the pen tool
trace around
different parts of
the image

Use LAYERS to see
all the different
parts


check the
order

S
elect paths and fill with colour/
apply gradients/textures and
patterns

Select all the paths and go
to modify> combine paths