SIMULATIONS NO MORE!

bonesworshipΤεχνίτη Νοημοσύνη και Ρομποτική

14 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 9 μήνες)

58 εμφανίσεις

SIMULATIONS NO MORE!


Outline

I.

Intro



II.

Research


III.

Deconstructing
Simulation

Activity


A.

What do people going through simulations remember the most
from the experience?

B.

What key
element of living with a disability does

a simulation
misses?


IV.

Substitution for

Simulations


A.

Video, Television, Movie discussion

B.


Mapping Exercise

C.

Others


V.

Q&A



Alberto Guzman, Ph.D.

albertog@email.arizona.edu

University of Arizona


Cheryl Muller, M.Ed.

mullerc@email.arizona.edu

University of Arizona

RESOURCES


Flower, A Burns, M., & Bottsford
-
Miller, N. (2007). Meta
-
analysis of disability
simulations research. Remedial and Special Education, 28(2), 72
-
79.

F
rench, S. (1992). Simulation exercises in disability awareness training: A critique.
Disability, Handicap & Society, 7(3), 257
-
266.

French, S. (1996). Simulation exercises in disability awareness training: A critique.
In G. Hales (Ed.), Beyond disability: Towards an enabling society, (pp. 114
-
123).
London: Sage.

Johnson, A. (2001)
Privilege, Power and Difference
.

Mountain View, CA 94
041:
Mayfield Publishing Company.

Lundberg, N. R. (2008). Using Wheelchair
Spo
rts to compliment Disability
Awareness Curriculum among college Students. Journal of Leisure Studies and
Recreation Education.
(
23
)
, 61
-
75.

Murphy, R. (Creator). (2009)
Glee


Wheels

[Television] Season 1 Episode 9
http://www.sidereel.com/Glee/season
-
1/episode
-
9

Pivik, J., McComas, J., MacFarlane, I., & Laflamme, M. (2002). Using virtual reality
to teach disabilit
y awareness. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 26(2),
203
-
218.

Rattray, N. (2007)
Universal design and accessible space: An assessment of space,
campus experiences, and attitudes about disability at the University of Arizona.
(Report) Tucson, Ari
zona: University of Arizona. Department of Anthropology.


Rubin, H. & Shapiro, D. (Directors) (2005)
Murderball

[Documentary] ThinkFilm
[United States]

Williams, R., & Datillo, J. (2005). Using wheelchair simulations to teach about
inclusion. Schole
: A Journal of Leisure Studies and Recreation Education, 20, 140
-
145.





Below is a scenario that our office
(Disability Resources at the University of
Arizona)
received, after it had been advertised, asking that a representative
attend the event as a fa
cilitator.

Suppose you were presented with this scenario,
how would you respond?

During our discussion, we will share how our office intervened, and what
happened next.

Dinner with a Twist

Focus: Values and Identity

Description:

Residents will receive
a physical disability based on where they sit at the dinner
table. They will receive one disability: 1arm, no arms, mut
e
, paraplegic, or blind.
They will be tied or blindfolded

at the dinner table. For the first 15 minute
duration of dinner the resident
s will only be able to eat with their disability, but is
allowed to ask for help. For the remaining time they will be able to eat normally
while having a facilitated discussion with someone from the DRC.

Goal/Objective:

The goal is to give residents the e
xperience of having a disability and what it feels
like. Showing how lucky we are and how much we,
obviously
, take for granted. It
takes them out of their comfort zone, and places them
in someone

else’s shoes.
The experience gives new perspective on jud
ging people too quickly, realizing
numerous people have disabilities.
Although

they are only
given physical

disabilities, there are invisible disabilities, which should still not be
respected.
The purpose of the speaker:

1. Break the
stereotype

of disabl
ed people being
only physically disable
d

when
, in the majoring of cases, people who are
disabled
are mentally disabled.

2. Talk about the resources on
campuse that are

avai
lable
for people with disabilities
.

Budget:

$400.00 (estimated)

Audience:

~30