Curriculum Guide, 2012-2013 - Southwest Chicago Christian ...

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Philosophy


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2

Graduation Requirements

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4

College Entrance Requirements

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4

Christian Service Requirements

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4

Academic Programs and Related Information

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5
-
7


Weighted Grades

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.............................

5


Grade Point Averages

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5


Honor Rolls

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.....

5


Incomplete and Failure

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...................

5


Advanced Placement

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.......................

5


Academic Probation

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........................

6


Transfer Credits

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..............................

6


Course Selection

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.............................

6


Online Classes

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................................
.

7


Home Schooling Credit

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..................

7


Work Release

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..

7


Moraine Valley College Courses

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....

7


Schedule Changes

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...........................

7

Departmental Philos
ophies and Course Offerings

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8
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38


Applied Technology
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8
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9


Biblical Studies

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10
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11


Business

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...

12
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15


English

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16
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18


Foreign Language

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19
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20


Math


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23


Performing Arts

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25


Physical Education

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26
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27


Science

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28
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32


Social Studies

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33
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35


Visual Art

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.

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38

Academic Support Program

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39

Res
ponse to Intervention Program

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39

Sequence of Courses

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4
0

Four
-
Year P
lanner

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Chicago Christian High School

Graduation Requirements













College Entrance
Requirements

Many colleges and universities have entrance requirements which are higher than high school graduation
demands. Therefore students, who plan to attend college, are strongly advised to meet the requirements

below
.


English

4.00 credits

Foreign

Language

2.00 credits

Mathematics

3.00 credits

Science

3.00 credits

Social Studies

3.00 credits





Christian Service Requirement


All students must complete ten

hours of community service per year as a requirement for graduation from
Chicago Christian High Schoo
l. The following activities

qualify for service credit:

a) Volunteering at local agencies, hospitals, schools, nursing homes, city agencies, churches, et
c.

b) Service at
Chicago Christian High School,

such as working in a supportive role in curricular or co
-
curricular activities or working as an office or department assistant.

c) Participation in a church or youth group project which focuses on service o
r outreach.






Bible

2.00 credits

Computer Applications

0.50 credits

Economics

0.50 credits

English

4.00 credits

Mathematics

3.00 credits

Fine Arts

0.50 credits

Physical Education/Health

2.50 credits

Science

2.00 credits

Social Studies

2.50 credits

Electives

6.50 credits

Total Credits for Graduation

24 credits

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GENERAL INFORMATION


Weighted Grades

In addition to the AP courses which receive an additional 1.0 quality point, honors courses receive an
additional .5 quality point (A=4.5, B=3.5, C=2.5, D=1.5). Courses that qualify for weighted grades are:
Honors Algebra II, Honors Geometry, Honors Pre
-
Calculus, Honors Physics, Honors Biology, Honors
Chemistry, Honors World
Literature, Honors Western Civilization
,
and
Honors Chemistry II.


Grade Point Average

The cumulative GPA is based on final
semester
grades with all courses included in accordance wit
h the
credit received. Quality points are assigned as follows: A=4, B=3, C=2, D=1, F=0. A
plus (+) or

A minus (
-
)

will raise or lower the points by 0.33. The cumulative GPA is used to determine class rank.


Honor Rolls

Each semester an Honor Roll and
a High Honor Roll are published. A student is named to the Honor Roll
if a GPA of 3.00 or better has been achieved. Students named to the High Honor Roll must have a GPA
of 3.50 or better. Honor rolls are based on the gr
ades a student receives in the f
i
nal column of the report
card. A student mu
st be enrolled in a minimum of
four

classes at Chicago Christian to be eligible for the
Honor Roll.


Incomplete and Failure

Students who receive an "Incomplete" in a course must complete the work within
one week

of the end of
the marking period. If not, the outstanding work is given a
n F
,

and a final grade is calculated including the
F
. Students who fail a required course must repeat the course. If a student does not make up the work
during summer school, he/sh
e will automa
tically be registered for the class

the following year.


A student who earns fewer than 5.0 credits in any given year must earn additional credits in summer
school in order to be re
-
admitted for the fall term.


A student may be placed on acade
mic probation on the basis of excessive failures. The Board of
Directors reserves the right to refuse to re
-
admit a student for unsatisfactory achievement after two
consecutive semesters of academic probation.


Advanced Placement

Eight

Advanced Placement
(AP) courses are offered, which include Biology, Calculus AB, Language and
Composition, Literature and Composition, U.S. Government and Politics, U.S. History,
Psychology
and
Spanish Language. Students are encouraged to take AP courses and the correspondi
ng exams in subjects
of interest and talent in preparation for college. These courses receive weighted grades, and students may
be eligible for college credit
depending on the college where they enroll
.



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Academic Probation

I.

A student will be placed on aca
demic probation for any of
the following
reasons

A.

Two courses are failed in any one semester;

B.

The total number of credits is less than:

1.

5.75 after the freshman year;

2.

11.5 after the sophomore year;

3.

17.25 after the junior year.

C.

The student’s effort, work habits, and attitude toward pursuing a high school education is judged

by faculty and administration to be inadequate. Such determination can be made at any point in the
academic year. A probationary agreement will be drawn u
p by the school personnel and must be
signed and met by th
e student in order to return

the following semester.

II.

In addition to being placed on probation, any student who fails more than 1.5 credits in a given school
year must earn a minimum of 0.5 credits a
t an approved institution during the summer prior to the
beginning of the new school year for continued attendance at CCHS.

III.

Following two consecutive semesters of probation
,

a decision will be made by the administration for
continued attendance at CCHS
,

or

the student may be asked to leave.

IV.

A student who has already been on academic probation for
one

year will not be re
-
admitted to the high
school.

V.

A student
will be

taken off probationary status if
he/she

pass
es

all classes in a semester.


Transfer Credits

A t
ra
nsfer student’s grades and grade point average from the previous
high school will be recorded on
transcript as received from the former school. However, prior credits may be adjusted to accommodate
the Chicago Christian High School credit structure,
and it will be noted that these credits were transferred
from another school.
Tr
ansfer grades will not count in

the Chicago Christian High School GPA.
A
maximum of five transfer credits will be accepted toward the graduation requirement. Generally,
credit
value will be assigned based on the equivalent course offering at Chicago Christian High School. Grade
Point Average, class rank, and class honors will be based only on the grades received during a student’s
attendance at Chicago Christian High Sch
ool. Likewise, a student must have been enrolled for three
semesters to be considered for the highest class honors (valedictorian or salutatorian).


Chicago Christian High School students who take off
-
campus or online courses will receive credit under
the

following conditions:


1.

Prior approval obtained from the Principal or Registrar.

2.

Credits
are
earned through an accredited organization.


Course Selection

Students will be provided opportunities to learn about course offer
ings through meetings with the
Principal, Counselors, Teachers, and A
dvisors. Some academic courses are cumulative in
nature;

therefore, teacher and/or administrative guidance for selecting the proper level of a course may be
required. Academic rigor for selecting courses is always en
couraged. Careful selection of classes is
important and, in doing so, a student should conside
r their areas of strength

and interest in preparation for
college or career.


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Online Classes

Online cl
asses are available to students

for an additional fee
.

Ther
e is a room available in the media center
for students who a
re taking online classes. This room is

available
for student use before school
,

or during
their study hall. Contact the
R
egistrar
or Guidance Counselor for more information.


Home Schooling
Credit

Credits for home schooling courses will be accepted if the instruction was under the supervision of a
certified teacher or accredited home schooling agency and the time included a
minimum of 150 hours

per
credit. No GPA credit will be given. Chica
go Christian High School reserves the right to administer
either a standardized test
,

or one or more of its subject matter examinations
,

to verify credit prior to
acceptance of home school credit.


Work Release

Seniors who have part
-
time jobs after school
and who will have enough credits to graduate may be
eligible to leave school after fifth or sixth period. An early dismissal request form and notes from a parent
and employer must be submitted to the attendance office.


Moraine Valley College Courses

Chic
ago Christian
High School
has an agreement with
MVCC

to provide a variety of courses for our
students on a dual enrollment basis. For specified Business Education courses (Computer Applications I
and II and Word Processing) students take their instruction
from CCHS teachers and meet here at the high
school. If the student earns a B or better in the class and pays the fee
assessed by the college, he/
she will
receive credit from Moraine Valley (three college credits).


Students may also choose to take other c
lasses at Moraine Valley that meet their academic goals. Students
interested in this option are encouraged to speak with
the college counselor

about which classes may work
with their schedules. Students often choose classes that mee
t in the evenings once p
er week

or on the
weekends. Moraine Valley offers the Jump Start Program to cover th
e tuition for the first class a

hig
h
school student takes on Moraine’s
campus. Funding for the Jump Start Program is dependent
o
n State
Legislature and may vary from year t
o year. Tuition and fees not covered by the Jump Start Program are
the responsibility of the student and parents. Students are also responsible for their own transportation to
and from the MVCC campus.


Schedule Changes


Ideally, any adjustment to a student’s schedule should be completed two weeks before the start of any
semester. In all circumstances, a schedule change request form, available in the office, must be completed
before the meeting with the Registrar.


A stude
nt may add or drop a
course

to his/her schedule during the first five class days of each
semester by arrangement with the Registrar.


After the first

five
days of a semester, a schedule change must be approved by the Principal.

A
dropped course can only b
e replaced by a study hall
.


After the first five

weeks of a semester, a dropped course will receive a W (withdraw fail) and will
factor into the GPA as an F. This requires the consent of
the
parent/guardian.

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Applied Technology
Department


Philosophy


The Technology Department has a three
-
part mission:

1. to increase awareness of God’s hand in providing the resources for technology,
and our proper
response to Him,

2.
t
o develop an understanding of
various technological systems,


3. to

solve engineering problems using technological methods and techniques.




Technology

Elective
Sequence

Level

9
th

10
th

11
th

12th

Electives

CADD I

CADD II

Intro
duction

to
Engineering


Electives

Foundations of
Technology

Introduction to
Engineering

Wood

Technology


Note:

The sequence of classes can begin at any grade level.




Foundations of Technology

914

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Elective: Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

This course is an activity
-
based course that explores many facets of
technology. Some of the concepts
that students will learn include fluid power, digital circuits, stress analysis, and robotics. Students will
have the opportunity to learn as they build their own projects and test their designs. Students will develop
in
creased awareness of God’s gift of technology
,

and man’s use of it
,

to form and transform our world.


Introduction to Engineering

916

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Prerequisite:
Foundations of Technology and CADD I OR



Foundations of Tec
hnology and PreCalculus or Functions, Stats and Trig


Elective: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

This course gives students the opportunity to explore engineering concepts with a hands
-
on approach.
Students will be introduced to the technological design
process, and will work in groups to create their
own custom machines. The focus of this course is to bring ideas to life
,

from the brainstorm design
session to testing and competition. Students will develop increased awareness of God’s gift of
technology
,

and man’s use of it
,

to form and transform our world.






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Computer
-
Aided Drafting & Design (CADD) I

923

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Elective: Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

This is an
introductory course in c
omputer
-
aided design and drafting.
Topics include mechanical,
architectural, and schematic drafting, 3D modeling and rendering, the alphabet of lines, and orthographic
projection. The goal of this class is to learn the industry standards fo
r technical drawing, as well as

develop competenci
es for various types of CAD software. Software may include AutoCAD, Solidworks,
Sketchup, Archicad, Blender, Mircrostation, PowerCivil, and 3D viashape.


Computer
-
Aided Drafting & Design (CADD) II

924

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Prerequisite: CADD I


Elect
ive: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

CADD II is a more advanced continuation of CADD I. Topics include mechanical, architectural, and
schematic drafting, 3D modeling and rendering. The goal of this class is to develop more advanced skills
in mechanical dra
wing and various CADD software. Emphasis is put on creating custom designs to solve
engineering problems. Software may include AutoCAD, Solidworks, Sketchup, Archicad, Blender,
Mircrostation, PowerCivil, and 3D viashape.


Wood Technology

935

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Prerequisite: CADD I


Elective: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

This is an introductory woodworking course which focuses on hands
-
on proj
ects. Each student builds
his/her own projects which include

a cutting board, a table, and a beach chair. The final project is to
design their own

project. Students learn about

wood types, sawing, sanding, and f
inishing techniques as
well as

learning to use many power and hand tools. The woodworking industry is
explored from
industrial to custom craftsmanship.



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Biblical Studies
Department


Philosophy:


Instructors in the Biblical Studies Department teach
from the standpoint of a Reformed Christian
worldview. That worldview affects every class taught in the
school, and the Biblical Studies department
seeks to instruct all students in the content and practice of the Christian faith from this distinct
perspective.


The Biblical S
tudies curriculum provides students with foundational tools for
:

understanding
Chri
stianity’s biblical basis, commonly held theological tenets, spiritual practices, and ethical teachings;
for knowing more about God and his redemptive love; for analyzing and engaging modern cultural
questions and trends; and for becoming servants of resto
ration within their homes, churches, and
communities.




Bible
Sequence

Level

9
th

10
th

11
th

12th

Required

Old Testament

New Testament Gospels

New Testament
Epistles

The Christian Church


Electives:

Leadership Class




Old Testament

011

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Required: Freshmen

This course is a study of the biblical text, Genesis through the r
eturn from Israel’s exile. The

course
explores salvation history as it unfolds in the Old Testament. Students will engage the text and explore
biblical the
mes of kingdom and covenant, God’s transcendence and immanence, justice and mercy,
holiness and love. Attention will be given to the geographical, cultural, and historical contexts. Students
will consider how Jesus Christ is the ultimate fulfillment

of t
he Old Testament, how the L
iving Word
speaks to us today,
and how they

might be challenged to walk deeper into the Kingdom of God.


New Testament Gospels

021

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Required: Sophomores

This course is a historical study of the life and teachings of Christ. The study begins with the
intertestamental period, le
ading to the birth of Christ, and
Jesus’

teachings, miracles, disciples, His last
week, resurrection, and ascension. This course e
mphasizes living a life of disciples
hip to Jesus and
following His Great C
ommission.





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New Testament Epistles

031

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Required: Juniors

This course examines Paul’s life and missionary journeys

through the book of Acts. The

course explains
the difference between systematic and task theology in Paul’s
thirteen

letters to churches and individuals.
Students will learn about the context and teachings of each of Paul’s letters in the first century with an
emphasis on applying Pa
ul’s topics to students’ lives today.


The Christian Church

041

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Required: Seniors

This course explores the birth, growth, and branching out of the Christian church. Students will trace the
historical develo
pment of the major church families and examine how each family (branch) defines proper
principles of doctrine and life. Field trips and discussions bring the church to life for students as they
develop a clear understanding of Orthodox, C
atholic, and Prot
estant theologies
.


Leadership

071

Credit: 0.50

One Semester

Prerequisite: Student must be an elected member of Student Council

This course consists of theoretical, personal, and practical ideas and applications of leadership and is open
to Sophomores,
Juniors, and Seniors who have been elected to Student Council in the previous school
year. Students will not only study and discuss leadership principles, but through Student Council
,

they
will begin to put into action the substance of their learning. Ea
ch student will also complete the National
Association of Student Councils Student Leadership Certification program by completing a portfolio for
national recognition.



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Business Department


Philosophy


The Business Department of Chicago Christian High Sc
hool recognizes the significant role that Business
and Technology play in society. The Business Department has a unique mission that is a challenging and
rewarding responsibility: 1) to educate and train God's children within the Reformed Christian
perspe
ctive, so they may recognize the Lordship of Christ in all areas of life, including their education and
the choice of a professional career; 2) to assist students in identifying the responsibilities they have as
stewards of the talents and abilities God ha
s given them to be used in their education and/or chosen
career; 3) to provide an academic environment that will allow students to explore the world of business;
4) to assist students in making responsible choices regarding their future.


Computer Sequence

Level

9
th

10
th

11
th

12th

Required

Computer
Applications





Electives

Adv. Computer Applications

Graphics Applications

Word Processing

Web Design


Business Sequence

Level

9
th

10
th

11
th

12th

Required


Economics




Electives

Accounting I

& II

Introduction to Business

Business Law

Principles of Marketing

Entrepreneurship



Computer Applications


113

One Semester

Computer aptitude is required in other academic classes. Students are encouraged to take this course early in their high
school
coursework. All studen
ts have the option of taking a placement
exam that will allow them to
be pl
aced in a more
advanced

level to
meet the computer requir
ement.

The placement exam is given in May.

Credit: 0.50



Required: Freshmen



MVCC Dual Enrollment
Available

This course will prepare students for technology skills
needed
in high school and college. It will enable
students to master skills
necessary for research, problem
solving, and presentations using the Microsoft
Office suite. Specific topics incl
ude file/folder management, word processing including MLA formatting,
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spreadsheets, charts and graphs, database management, and presentations. Exercises integrating Word,
Excel, Access, and PowerPoint will be included at the end of each unit of study.

Wor
d Processing

(
Class offered alternate years
--
o
ffered in 201
2
-
2013
)

115

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Prerequisite: Computer Applications


Elective: Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors


MVCC Dual Enrollment Available

This course is devoted to teaching students intermediate and advanced features of Microsoft Word
software. At the end of the semester of instruction, students will be proficient at using features such as
mail merge, macros, tables, multi
-
page reports, for
ms, graphics, web pages, and work group
collaboration. Students will work with some integration between Word and other Office applications.
The digital camera, scanner, and Internet will be used throughout the class in various applications.


Graphics Ap
plication

116

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Prerequisite: None


Elective: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

This advanced course is devoted to teaching the student the process of using a computer to merge text and
graphics in an attractive and easily comprehensib
le format. Students will become proficient in Photoshop
and Indesign, while at the same time gaining knowledge of the basic principles of design. Students will
manipulate photos, design posters
,

and magazine spreads. This class is highly recommended for

both
students interested in
both
Business and Art.


Advanced Computer Applications

(
Class offered alternate years
--
not o
ffered in 201
2
-
2013
)

119

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Prerequisite: Computer Applications or Placement


Elective: Sophomores, Juniors, Se
niors


MVCC Dual Enrollment Available

This course is designed to develop advanced PC application skills required for the completion of personal
and business projects using the Microsoft Office suite. Advanced projects utilizing word processing,
spreadshee
t, database management, and presentation graphics software are included. Advanced
collaborative features and application integration are included in the course.


Web Page Design

121

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Prerequisite: None


Elective: Juniors,
Seniors

This course is designed to equip students with the technical skills necessary to effectively create, design,
and manage web sites. Students will write the XHTML code to design some of the most common
features on web pages such as tables, online or
der forms, frames, style sheets, and image maps. The
creation of Flash applets and actionscripting is also covered and integrated into their web pages.








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Economics

126

Credit: 0.50

One Semester

Required: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

Economics is a

course design
ed to familiarize students with our economic system
,

the m
anagement of
their finances,

their consu
mer responsibilities
, and the impact of government policy on our economy
.
Specifically,

personal financial activities such as budgeting, invest
ing, banking, the use of credit and
borrowing, the purchase of insurance and housing will be covered. Emphasis is placed on faithful
stewardship of the Lord’s financial resources.


Accounting I

127


Credit: 1.00

Full Year


Elective: Sophomores, Juniors,
Seniors

In Accounting I students will learn basic accounting principles as applicable to the primary forms of
business. This is accomplished by learning and applying the
steps of the accounting cycle.
Students will
utilize an accounting simu
lation for a s
ervice business.
Integration of QuickBooks accounting software is
included.


Accounting II

129


Credit: 1.00

Full Year


Prerequisite:
Accounting I


Elective: Juniors, Seniors

“Accounting II” is an advanced course designed for both college
-
bound and vocational students.
Much of
the same material that students will study in a beginning college accounting course is included, but the
material used is written at a level suitable for high school s
tudents. Students will increase their learning of
accounting for investments, long
-
term notes, partnerships, corporations and not
-
for
-
profit organizations.
Throughout the course, students will be challenged to use the accounting data for making challenging
business decisions.


Introduction to Business

13
0

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Elective: Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

Introduction to Business focuses on the principles proven for achieving business success. The basics of
entrepreneurship, business management, marketing, finance, and ownership
are studied. This project
-
based course includes team activities, competitions, and presentations centered around proven business
principles. The students will form their own small business through the use of a business plan.


Business Law

131

Credit: 0.5
0

One Semester


Prerequisite: Introduction to Business


Elective: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

Business Law is a study of the laws that govern business activity. Priority is given to a basic
understanding of business law, with time spent introducing the c
ourse with basic civil and criminal law.
A focused study of contracts will be made through the use of case studies and actual court decisions.
Students will participate in classroom mock trials. This course is recommended for college
-
bound
business stud
ents.


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Principles of Marketing
(Focusing on the Sports & Entertainment Industry)

135

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Prerequisite: Introduction to Business


Elective: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

This course will focus on the marketing principles of product
planning, research, packaging, advertising
and selling through the use of Sports and Entertainment products. Students will learn the unique methods
necessary for successfully mar
keting and distributing

sports
and entertainment events, sports media,
and
sp
orting goods. This course is recommended for the college
-
bound business student.


Entrepreneurship

137

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Elective: Juniors, Seniors

The Entrepreneurship course teaches the complete process necessary for starting and operating a bu
siness.
Students will discover the opportunities and benefits for today’s entrepreneurs. They will also learn how
to evaluate the potential for various business ideas and products. Business simulations will be used that
enable students to plan and creat
e their own businesses. The course will focus on applying the principles
of management, marketing, and finance to the students’ businesses. This course is beneficial and
recommended for Juniors or Seniors from all areas of interest who want to learn how
to take their ideas
and opportunities and use them to start their own business.


Internship

970


Credit: Up to 1.00

One Semester


Prerequisite: Application to Program


Elective: Seniors

This program gives students the opportunity to explore a career b
efor
e going to college or
the work force.
Students will

earn credit for the internship

but will not be paid. Students will meet once a month with the
internship coordinator and will be graded on reflective writing assignments and job performance. Seniors
who
have shown a good work ethic and positive attitude in prior semesters and have passed all classes in
the semester prior to their internship will be eligible. Students who are frequently tardy or absent should
not apply to the program. Students must provide

their own transportation

to and from their assignment.
Students are encouraged to suggest possible employers, but they may not do an internship in a family
business. Seniors interested must write “internship” on their registration form with their top thre
e career
choices. Then they must fill out an application form immediately and return it to the registrar to be
considered for the program. Applications are available in the office.

















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English
Department


Philosophy


Chicago Christian High
School

view
s

language as a gift from God by

which we can praise and serve H
im.
Our language curriculum prepares students to function as creative, responsible participants in their
communities. A vital language arts curriculum equips students with the abi
lity to respond to society as
well as to transform it. Students must be skilled in all aspects of language


an integration of listening,
speaking, reading, and writing. With this integrated language arts curriculum, students can be equipped to
serve God

more fully.




English

Sequence

Level

9
th

10
th

11
th

12th

Required

Introduction to
Literature and
Composition

World Literature and
Composition

American Literature
and Composition

Composition and
Grammar

Honors


Honors World
Literature and
Composition




AP



Advanced Placement
Language and
Composition

Advanced Placement
Literature and
Composition


Electives

Communications

Creative Writing I

Journalism

Modern Fiction




Introduction to Literature and Composition

151

Credit: 1.00

Full Year


Required:
Freshmen

This course will consist of a thorough examination of the types of literature. Writing will be done largely
in response to the literature. The course will be designed to promote extensive reading. Textbooks:
Night, To Kill a Mockingbird, Litera
ture Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes, Grammar For Writing
.


World Literature and Composition

161

Credit: 1.00

Full Year


Required: Sophomores

This course includes a library and research unit, writing a research paper, and the study of world
literature.
Textbooks:
World Literature; Lord of the Flies;

Vocabulary Workshop;

Cry
,

the Beloved
Country; Grammar For Writing;

A Midsummer Night’s Dream
.




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Honors World Literature

163

Credit: 1.00 (weighted grade)

Full Year


Elective: Sophomores in place of World Li
terature

This course includes a library and research unit, writing a research paper, and the study of world
literature. Textbooks:
World Literature; Lord of the Flies;

Cry
,

the Beloved Country; A Midsummer
Night’s Dream; Fahrenheit 451; Grammar for Writin
g;

and Vocabulary Workshop
. Independent reading
and in
-
depth analysis are an essential part of this class. Students must also demonstrate an ability to
compare themes to their Christian worldview.


American Literature and Composition

171

Credit: 1.00

Full

Year


Required: Juniors

This course includes a complete survey of American li
terature. It will focus on
major authors and classic
works. The writing of short literary analysis papers is required. Textbooks:
Adventures in American
Literature, The Scarlet

Letter, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Great Gatsby,
Grammar for
Writing, and
Vocabulary Workshop.


AP Language and Composition

177

Credit: 1.00 (weighted grade)

Full Year

Elective: Juniors in place of American Literature



Prerequisite: World
Literature

This course includes a survey of American Literature. It will focus on what the authors say and what
modes of writing they use to express themselves. Writing will include analysis, argumentative writing,
and expository writing.
The Language o
f Composition

is the major textbook. Some novels include
The
Scarlet Letter, The Adventures of Huckleb
erry Finn, The Great Gatsby, Grammar for Writing, and

Vocabulary

Workshop.

Students who take this course are well prepared to take the AP exam and are
e
ncouraged to do so.


Composition & Grammar

181

Credit: 1.00

Full Year

Required: Seniors (unless taking AP Literature and Composition or an elective in English)

This course includes an intensive study of all areas of traditional grammar and the writing of s
everal short
papers in various formats. Students will also complete a short literary analysis research paper. All
writing will b
e done from a thesis
. Textbooks:
Correct Writing and Writing With a Thesis
.


AP English Literature and Composition

183

Credit: 1.00 (weighted grade)

Full Year

Prerequisite:
American Literature
& Composition or AP Language & Composition

Elective: Seniors

This course wi
ll cover English literature in addition to

college level grammar and writing skills, including
literary ana
lysis research papers. Textbooks:
Elements of Literature, Correct Writing, Jane
Eyre, Wide
Sargasso Sea,

and Vocabulary Workshop.

Students who take this course are well prepared to take the AP
exam and are encouraged to do so.




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Communications

192

Cred
it: 0.50

One Semester


Elective: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

This course is a study of speaking and listening skills including non
-
verbal communication, discussion
and debate, and interpretive speech. Students will be expected to master the principles in
volved in
selecting, organizing, outlining, introducing, developing, and concluding a speech. They will also learn to
use clear, effective language and develop the skills of poise, confidence, and self
-
control. These goals
will be accomplished through th
e preparation and presentation of various speaking opportunities
including information, persuasive, and interview speeches. Textbook:
Glencoe Speech
.


Creative Writing

I

193

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Elective:
Sophomores,
Juniors, Seniors

This course is

designed for those who are interested in writing short sketches and poetry. A student need
not have written these forms before in order to sign up for this course. Creative Writing can be a great
benefit toward the development of good style. Students s
hould plan to write regularly, primarily from
assignments but also on their own. Students won’t be evaluated simply on creative ability, but rather on
how hard they work on developing whatever creative potential they have.


Journalism


191

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Elective:
Sophomores,
Juniors, Seniors

This course will give the student an opportunity to experience the area of journalism. The writing skills
covered in the class are as follows: the fundamentals of journalistic organization, word choice
(objective
vs. subjective, etc.), sentence variety, interviewing skills, integrating quotations, and writing in different
fields (culture, sports, news, etc.). Other content includes a short overview of journalism and evaluation
of the future of journalis
m in relation to the web. In addition to writing arti
cles, the students will

have
assessments on grammar, skill in evaluating articles from newspapers and blogs, and skill in editing for
both content and grammar. If time permits and student interest supp
orts, the class will experiment with
podcasts and vlogs. From a Reformed perspective, this class will focus on how journalism and
Christianity share a desire for truth and justice.

Students who take this class will be given the opportunity
to continue in
a journalism club, which meets outside of class time during second semester, where
students will produce an online publication every month.


Modern Fiction

198

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Elective: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

This course is designed for st
udents who are interested in short stories and novels of the last one hundred
years. This course will include major events in history from World War
I

to the present. Students will
contribute to an online discussion board and reflect on themes from the f
iction. Works in this course may
include the following:
"
The Dead
,"
Joyce;

The Metamorphosis,
Kafka;

The Screwtape Letters,
Lewis
;
and
The
Lord of the Rings
, Tolkien.







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Foreign Language
Department


Philosophy


We believe that God created us with the need and the ability to communicate with
Him

and with each
other. Language is one important form of communication, for it allows us to communicate verbally with
both God and man. In regards to our communication wit
h man, language systems are part of the created
order and reflect the diversity of peoples and cultures which make up the population of the world. The
teaching of foreign languages allows us the possibility of communicating directly with people of another

language and culture and helps foster appreciation of the wonderful differences and similarities that make
up humans.




Foreign Language
Sequence

Level

9
th

10
th

11
th

12th

Electives

Spanish I

Spanish II


Spanish III

Spanish IV

AP Spanish

Electives

Spanish II

Spanish III

Spanish IV


AP Spanish

Note:

The sequence of clas
ses depends on the grade you start of your first class
.




Spanish I

423


Credit: 1.00

Full Year

Elective: Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

At this level the students are
introduced to the Spanish language. Students learn the language through a
variety of activities and focus on reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students will learn vocabulary
for describing likes and dislikes, characteristics, classrooms, foods,
locations in the community, family
members, household chores, and clothing. They will also focus on using the present tense to express
ideas.



Spanish II

425

Note: Any Freshmen who wants to take Spanish II MUST take a placement test to
do so. Contact

the
department head for the
date the
placement test

will be given in June.

Credit: 1.00

Full Year


Prerequisite: Spanish I


Elective:
Freshmen,
Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

Students will continue to build on the vocabulary and grammar structures from Span
ish I. Studen
ts will
learn vocabulary
to describe afterschool activities, daily routines and errands; give directions; describe
childhood characteristics, activities, and holidays; describe emergency situations and accidents; and
describe television shows

and movies. They will also focus on using the Preterite and Imperfect tenses to
describe past actions and situations.


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Spanish III

427

Credit: 1.00

Full Year


Prerequisite: Spanish II


Elective: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

The target language will be
used as much as possible by both teacher and students. New vocabulary will
be learned as well as more advanced grammar structures, especially the Subjunctive Mood in the present
tense. Reading comprehension will also be stressed as well as developing mor
e advanced writing skills.
Understanding native speakers of the target language from various countries will also be emphasized.


Spanish IV

429

Credit: 1.00

Full Year


Prerequisite: Spanish III


Elective: Juniors, Seniors

The target language once again
will be used by both teacher and students as much as possible.


Students
will also continue to learn new vocabulary words and all grammar points learned in Spanish I, II, III will
be reviewed.


In addition, understanding, memorizing and using the Subjuncti
ve Mood in the past tense,
known as the Imperfect Subjunctive, will be emphasized and wi
ll allow the student to

become fluent in
the target language.


Finally, students will daily improve their listening and conversational skills in the
target language.


A
P

Spanish

443

Credit: 1.00

Full Year


Prerequisite:
Spanish IV


Elective: Seniors

All lessons and speaking will take place in the target language. All grammar structures will once again be
reviewed with special attention given to reading, writing
,

and con
versational skills. Also, the class will
focus on

preparing each student to successfully pass the AP Spanish Language exam with at least a score
of 4 out of 5.



Online Language Classes


Online language classes are available to students
, for an additional

fee,

who are interested in studying
other foreign languages.
There is a room available in the media center for students who are taking online
classes. This room is

for student use before school
,

or during their study hall.

Contact the
R
egistrar
or
Guidance Counselor
for more information
.
















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Math
Department


Philosophy


Mathematics is a gift from God


a gift to be enjoyed and to be used to glorify God. Chicago Christian
High
School’s mathematics curriculum serves to equip students
to use mathematics as a tool with which
to help explore and restore God’s creation. In order to do this responsibly, studen
ts will

be
come

proficient in various aspects of mathematics: an integration of mathematical reasoning, mathematical
communication, p
roblem solving, computation
,

and spatial reasoning skills.


While integration of math with other curricular areas is valued, we recognize a particularly close
relationship with science. Development of critical thinking and problem
-
solving skills in scienc
e and
mathematics is essential to developing the literacy needed to become responsible Christian citizens armed
with the tools to aid in the restoration of God’s kingdom.


Applying mathematics across various subject areas is the means to developing new k
nowledge and new
technology. The
CCHS
curriculum strives to make sure each student is literate in mathematics and is
prepared to continue at the college or university leve
l if that student should
so
desire
. Mathematically
literate students will be better

prepared to serve God in all rea
l
ms of life.



Math Sequence

Level

9
th

10
th

11
th

12th

Required

Algebra I

Geometry

Geometry

Algebra II

Algebra II

Pre
-
Calculus


Honors

Geometry

Algebra II

Pre
-
Calculus



AP




Calculus

AB


Electives

Functions,
Trigonometry, and Statistics (FST)

Pre
-
Calculus

Calculus



Algebra I

515

Credit: 1.00

Full Year


Required: Freshmen (unless placed in a different math class)

This course serves as the foundation for all other math courses at the high school level. It
begins with a
study of the properties of the real number system, which regulates algebraic operations. Other first
semester topics include simplifying and evaluating algebraic expressions and solving equations.
Graphing linear equations is covered extens
ively as well. Second semester topics include solving
inequalities and systems of linear equations, simplifying and factoring polynomials, simplifying rational
and radical expressions as well as solving quadratic equations. Achieving a C
-

is required in
this class to
move on to all other math classes.

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Geometry

535

Credit: 1.00

Full Year


Required: Freshmen, Sophomores

This course is a standard presentation of the fundamentals of Euclidean geometry. First semester topics
include an introduction to the lang
uage of geometry, followed by the study of constructions with a
compass and straightedge, as well as properties of triangles, special quadrilaterals and circles. Second
semester topics include area and volume, similarity, resolving right triangles, and in
troduction to
trigonometry and transformations. Geometer’s Sketchpad will be utilized throughout the year to aid in
visual understanding of concepts.


Honors Geometry

533


Credit: 1.00 (weighted grade)

Full Year


Elective: Freshmen, Sophomores

This course

explores a higher level of traditional geometry topics as listed in course #535. Logical
thinking using both inductive and deductive reasoning is stressed. Mathematical proof is used throughout
the course to show the validity of mathematical

theorems.


A
lgebra II

525


Credit: 1.00


Full Year


Prerequisite: Geometry
and C
-

or higher in Algebra I


(Note: Remedial work will be required for students achieving less than a C
-

in Algebra I)


Required: Sophomores, Juniors

This course expects a working knowledge
of topics covered in Algebra I. Similar topics are reviewed then
explored in more detail. First semester topics include solving and graphing absolute value equations and
inequalities, linear programming, solving systems of linear equations and inequalitie
s, matrices, and
rational expressions. Second semester topics include complex numbers, quadratic functions, standard
deviation, circles, polynomial functions
,

and rational expressions.


Honors Algebra II

523


Credit: 1.00 (weighted grade)

Full Year


Prere
quisite:
Honors Geometry
, or
Geometry and
B in Algebra I with teacher permission


Elective: Sophomores, Juniors

This course covers similar material as Algebra II
, though,

in more depth and at a quicker pace. Complex
thinking skills and independent learning skills are expected. Additional topics include determinants,
graphing complex numbers, Descartes Rule, iteration, using quadratic techniques to solve polynomial
equati
ons, exponential and logarithmic functions, sequences and series, and the Binomial Theorem.


Functions, Statistics and Trigonometry

547

Credit: 1.00

Full Year


Prerequisite: Algebra II


Elective: Juniors, Seniors

Students will study the nature of functions

and various kinds of functions in context with real world
situations tying in students' experience. Students will explore descriptive statistics as well as inferential
statistics with project work included in each unit. Students will also explore some c
oncepts in

trigonometry. College
-
bound students interested in Elementary/Special Education, Humanities, Fine
Arts, Nursing, Social Work, Soci
ology, Psychology, or Business are encouraged to take this course
.

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Pre
-
Calculus

543


Credit 1.00

Full Year


Prerequisite:
C
-

or higher in
Algebra II

or Functions, Stat
istics

& Trig
o
nometry


Elective: Juniors, Seniors

This course begins with a review of fundamental concepts of Algebra, then emphasizes analytical and
graphical methods of problem solving. First s
emester topics include
:

shifting, reflecting, str
etching
,

and
combining functions;

polynomial, rational, exponent
ial, and logarithmic functions;
and an introduction to
the unit circle and right triangle trigonometry. Second semester topics include
:

graphi
ng trigonometric
functions, analytical trigonometry, linear programming, matrices, and probability. Students interested in
majors or careers in mathematics, science, or engineering are encouraged to take this course.


Honors Pre
-
Calculus

545

Credit 1.00 (
weighted grade)

Full Year


Prerequisite:
C
-

in
Honors Algebra II

or

B in
Algebra II
with teacher permission


Elective: Juniors, Seniors

This course builds on a thorough understanding of topics covered
in
Algebra II and Geometry, providing
an in
-
depth study of advanced algebra concepts, analytical geometry, and trigonometry. First semester
topics include common functions, polynomial, rational exponential, and logarithmic functions, partial
fractions, and a
nalytical trigonometry. Second semester topics continue in the study of trigonometry, then
include linear programming, matrices, probability, conic sections, parametric and polar equations.
Students who enjoy rigorous mathematics, intend to take AP Calcu
lus, or pursue a major or career in
mathematics, science, or engineering are encouraged to take this course.


AP
Calculus

AB

553


Credit: 1.00 (weighted grade)

Full Year


Pr
erequisite:
C
-

in
Honors Pre
-
Calculus or
B in
Pre
-
Calculus

with teacher permission


Elective: Juniors, Seniors

Concepts covered during the course include limits and their properties; differentiation and its applications;
integration; logarithmic, exponential, and other functions. All topics are approached numerically,
graphically, analytically, and verbally. Both
theory and applications will be emphasized.
This course will
require independent work from students.
A summer assignment will be given.



This course prepares students

to ea
rn college credit

by taking the AP Calculus AB exam. Test questions
will be give
n similar to AP problems along with AP review packets.

















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Performing Arts Department


Philosophy


Performing Arts
can further spiritual growth,
promote study

of world history and cultures, and develop
creativity, musical skills
,

and expression. Students will develop
their
skills in order to better appreciate
quality music, provide aesthetic experiences, and most importantly, to praise our God.




Performing Arts

Sequence

Level

9
th

10
th

11
th

12th

Electives

Drama

I

Drama

II



Electives

Concert Band





Electives

Campus Choir

Concert Choir



Note:

Choose one course from

Visual Art,

Concert Band
,

or Choir

to fulfill the Fine Arts
r
equirement.



Drama

I

196

Credit: 0.50

One Semester

Elective: Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors,
Seniors


This course exposes students to aspects of believability, physical acting, voice preparation, scene study,
stage movement, improvisation, and characterization. Part of the course includes memorizing various
roles, participating in a final perform
ance, and evaluating plays at other venues.


Drama II

197

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Elective: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors


Prerequisite: Beginning Drama

This course will expand upon the actor’s work in Beginning Drama. It will offer a more in
-
depth study of
acting with more performance assignments. This course will also introduce students to aspects of
technical theater, audition techniques, monologue pe
rformances, scene writing, and advanced
improvisation work. Students will also read a novel and critique a performance of it at a local
t
heater.








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Concert Band

277

Credit: 1.00

Full Year


Prerequisite: Audition


Elective: All classes


Satisfies Fine
Arts Requirement

This course offers students exposure to a wide variety of musical styles through instrumental
performance. Proper tone production, technical proficiency, and praising the Lord using our musical gifts
will be highlighted throughout the yea
r as the band performs quality band literature in a variety of
performance venues.

Participation in Pep Band is a requirement.


Campus Choir

286

Credit: 1.00

Full Year


Elective: Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors


Satisfies Fine Arts Requirement

Thi
s class provides an opportunity for students of any class or ability level to sing in a performing group.
It is designed to improve vocal and choral skills at any level while utilizing a wide variety of choral
literature. Comprehensive musicianship is emp
hasized. There are usually four required concerts per year.


Concert Choir

287

Credit: 1.00

Full Year


Prerequisite: Audition


Elective: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors


Satisfies Fine Arts Requirement

This is our most advanced vocal performing ensemble. Pr
evious experience in Campus Choir is helpful
for students wishing to participate in Concert Choir. Development of the independent musician is
emphasized: refining the students' ability to use good vocal and choral techniques as well as their ability
to si
ght read. There are usually four required concerts per year including the performance of a major
choral work. Frequent practices before school may be required.
























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Physical Education
Department


Philosophy


The Physical Education D
epartment seeks to fulfill the mission of
CCHS

which states that we want “to
provide a high quality education program…that prepares students spiritually, socially, academically, and
physically to serve effectively…by honoring God
in all aspects of life.” O
ur goal

is to promote a healthy
lifestyle and an attitude of personal Christian stewardship. We will assist students in their attempt to
achieve personal health levels associated with peak cognitive performance and long term
good
health
while challenging t
hem to honor God by developing the body with which He has blessed them.


Physical Education
Sequence

Level

9
th

10
th

11
th

12th

Required

Health

Physical Education I

One selection from

PE Electives

One selection from

PE Electives

One selection from

PE
Electives


Electives:

Physical Education II

Competitiv
e Sports and Advanced Fitness

Strength Training


Strength Training II


H
ealth
660
Credit: 0.50

1 Semester

Required: Freshmen

In this introductory class, students will learn about human body systems, nutrition, relationships, and the
dangers of addictive substances. Additionally, they will participate in fitness labs that utilize heart rate
monitors, weight training, and non
-
load

bearing training. For the capstone project, students will learn to
develop a personal fitness plan for themselves and will be required to follow their plan for one month.


P
hysical Education I


Foundations of Fitness

661
Credit: 0.50

1 Semester

Required:

Freshman, Sophomores,

In this foundational class, students will learn the basics of personal fitness. A typical week will include 2
to 4 fitness conditioning and 1 to 3 days of sports play. Sport units are purposefully cardiovascular intense
and will inc
lude ultimate Frisbee, soccer, floor hockey, lacrosse, and speedball.



P
hysical Education II


Team Sports and Conditioning

670

Credit: 0.50

1 Semester

Grade Level: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

This course continues instruction on personal fitness and
fitness testing but focuses on building
fundamental skills and movements and learning rules

of

game
s
. A
typical week will include two to four

days of

fitness conditioning and one to three

days of sports play. Sport units covered include flag football,
team

handball, soccer, badminton, and ultimate Frisbee.




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Competitive Sports & Advanced Fitness

674

Credit: 0.50










1 Semester

Prerequisite: Physical Education I or II and Department approval

Grade
Level: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

(
Note: Can be repeated once for credit
)

This course assumes students have basic sport fundamentals and therefore fo
cuses on competitive play
and conditioning with an emphasis on athletic strategy and developing roles for team success. A
typical
week will include two to four

days of

fitness conditioning and one to three

days of competitive sports
play. Sport units cover
ed include badminton, ultimate Frisb
ee, lacrosse, and floor hockey.


S
trength Training

677

Credit: 0.50










1 Semester

Grade Level: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

This course will instruct students on proper lifting techniques, safety measures, and how to develop
effective weight training workouts. Workouts will be largely teacher
-
designed during the first month of
the semester. After the first month, students will
design their own workouts based on personal fitness
goals and will meet with the instructor weekly to discuss their plan. A typical week will
be
five days in
the weight room, with one day including cardiovascular fitness.


S
trength Training II

679

Credit:

0.50










1 Semester

Prerequisite: Strength

Training


Grade Level:
Juniors, Seniors

(Note: May be repeated once for credit)

This course will focus on teaching students to set personal weight training goals, analyze the results, and
adjust their goals
monthly to meet fitness testing weaknesses or sport
-
specific goals. Students will be
asked to design their own workouts and meet with the instructor weekly to discuss the development of
their plans. Students enrolled in this class will be given personal fr
eedom during plan development and
are thus held to advanced expectations for behavior, work ethic, and fitness testing. This clas
s may

meet
at the same time as
Strength

Training
.



Senior Varsity Athlete Exemption

676


Credit: None


Prerequisite:
Athletic Director and Registrar Approval


Grade Level: Seniors

This option is for senior varsity student
-
athletes who need to be granted cour
se exemption in order to take
an
academic course for college prep
aration.
S
eniors must be members of a varsity team during their senior
year, they must have been members of that sport’s program for two of their previous three years, and
must
have been

a member of the varsity team

one year
. If
the student
does not partic
ipate in
the
sport, they
must take PE second semester. If their sport occurs during second semester
,

they must participate in an
indepe
ndent fitness plan that will be graded by the PE department.
Prior to registration
, the student
-
athlete
must fill out the

pre
-
registration form

to be approved by the Registrar and the Athletic Director.






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Science
Department


Philosophy


The philosophy of
Chicago Christian
High School

recognizes that all things were created
by God and are
being upheld by H
is providential

care. All was created in perfect harmony. However, our fall into sin
changed this balance. Jesus Christ has redeemed us, and we are instructed to work for the restoration of
Creation and the development of His Kingdom.


Students will develop critical thin
king and problem
-
solving skills in science to become responsible
Christian citizens armed with the tools needed to aid in the restoration of God’s kingdom. The curriculum
strives to integrate and apply concepts across the various subject areas.


By studyi
ng and understanding the world God gave us, students honor God and become better prepared to
aid in the world’s restoration.




Science Sequence

Level

9
th

10
th

11
th

12th

Required

Biology

Chemistry

Physics


Honors

Biology

Chemistry

Physics



AP



Biology



Note:
College
-
bound students interested in a science

major should take the H
onors courses.


Electives:

Anatomy & Physiology

Environmental Science

College Chemistry: General, Organic, and Biochemistry

Honors Chemistry II:
(
preparation for the AP exam
)




Anatomy and Physiology

741

Credit: 0.50

One Semester

Prerequisites: Biology (Honors Biology), Chemistry (Honors Chemistry), Physics (Honors
Physics)

Elective: Seniors

This course focuses on how the structure of the human body relates to its overall func
tion from molecules
to organ systems. The class is designed for students interested in medical or health careers. Students will
study human tissues and the senses, in addition to the respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive, nervous,
endocrine, urinary, re
productive, integumentary, skeletal, and muscular systems. The course content will
be supported with lab experiences and mammal dissection activities
.




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Biology

735

Credit: 1.00

Full Year


Required: Freshmen

Biology is a traditional high school course using the Holt Biology textbook by Johnson and Raven.
Students will gain a better understanding about the living world around them through lecture, lab, and
projects. Topics will include biological themes, bioch
emistry, cells, photosynthesis, cellular respiration,
genetics, cell division, DNA replication
,

and protein synthesis in the first semester. The second semester
will include biotechnology, viruses, bacteria, protists, fungi, plant structure and function,
and frog
dissection with comparative human anatomy.


Honors Biology

737

Credit: 1.00 (weighted grade)

Full Year


Prerequisite: Exemplary standardized test scores and science teacher recommendation


Elective: Freshmen (fulfills Biology requirement)

Honors
Biology is an in
-
depth program using Biology by Miller and Levine. Students will explore the
living world around them by completing inquiry labs and hands
-
on experiences
,

including gr
owing plants
and dissecting frogs
. Topics covered will be the same as
i
n
Biology but in greater depth.

Students will
use an internet
-
based program to enhance learning.


AP Biology

765

Credit: 1.00 (weighted grade)

Full Year


Prerequisite: Biology, Chemistry, and Teacher Recommendation


Elective: Junior, Senior

The AP Biology

course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory Biology course utilizing
a college textbook, syllabus, and lab format as prescribed by The College Board. Topics will include
biochemistry, cells, photosynthesis, cellular respiration, her
edity, molecular genetics, diversity of
organisms, structure and function of plants and animals, and ecology. AP Biology is a lab intensive
course. Students will be challenged in this course with lab reports, reading, and writing. After showing
themselve
s to be qualified on the AP Biology Examination in May, students, as college freshman, may
take upper level classes in Biology and/or may fulfill a requirement for a laboratory
-
science course.


Chemistry

745

Credit: 1.00

Full Year

Prerequisite: Biology and

Algebra I


Elective: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

Chemistry, the central science, is the study of the composition of matter and the
changes that matter
undergoes.
Through lectures, demonstrations, and
many laboratory experiments (one to two

per week)
,

the student will gain a more in
-
depth understanding of his/her world from both the macroscopic and
microscopic perspective. Major topics include atomic structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry,
chemical reactions, gas laws, thermochemistry, solutions,
and acids and bases. Students planning to go to
college are strongly encouraged to take this course in order to build an understandi
ng of basic chemistry,
improve

critical thinkin
g, inquiry, and develop problem
-
solving skills.




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Honors Chemistry


747

Cre
dit: 1.00 (weighted grade)

Full Year


Prerequisite: Biology and Algebra I


Elective: Sophomore, Junior, Senior

This is

a faster paced, more in
-
depth course, with more challe
nging experiments and homework
and will
require more independent work by the studen
t than general chemistry. Homework is online, utilizing the
University of Indiana’s CALM program. Any student who is interested in science, is thinking of
majoring in science, and/or wants the challenge should take this course instead of general chemistr
y.
Chemistry, the central science, is the study of the composition of matter and the
changes that matter
undergoes.
Through lectures, demonstrations, and
many laboratory experiments (one to two

per week),
and online homework
,

the student will gain a more in
-
depth understanding of his/her world from both the
macroscopic and microscopic perspective. Major topics include atomic structure, chemical bonding,
stoichiometry, chemical reactions, gas laws, thermochemistry, solutions,
and acids and bases. Laboratory
skills, critical thinking, inquiry, and problem solving skills will be emphasized in this course.


College Chemistry: General, Organic, and Biochemistry

754

Credit: 1.00 (weighted grade)

Full Year

Prerequisite: Biology, Ch
emistry, and Algebra II


Elective: Juniors, Seniors

This hon
ors level course will build on

the foundation developed in chemistry in the first semester
covering the general topics and then will cover the new material of organic and biochemistry in the
secon
d semester. The college level textbook will be purchased by the student for two important reasons:
the student can then

freely write/highlight in his/her

book, and the textbook will be an excellent resource
for college science courses. Through lectures,
discussions, experiments, and homework the student will
be guided to a greater level of understanding of God’s world through the perspective of chemistry.
Independent learning, inquiry,

critical thinking, and problem
-
solving skills will be enhanced by tak
ing
this course. This course is fully intended to prepare the student who plans on majorin
g in science to
succeed in
college science courses by insu
ring a solid general foundation

and developing an introductory
understanding and appreciation of organic an
d biochemisty.
Students interested in f
uture careers in the
fields of agriculture, medicine, energy engineering, environmental, education, food, nutrition, materials,
and transportation
are

strongly
encouraged to take this course
.


Honors Chemistry II

755


Credit: 1.00 (weighted grade)

Full Year

Prerequisite: Chemistry I and Algebra II (Pre
-
calculus is recommended).


Elective: Juniors, Seniors

This course will build on

the foundation developed in Honors Chemistry I and will use a college level
textbook/CD ROM. The course has a dual purpose. The first is to prepare interested students for taking
the AP Chemistry exam. The second is to provide an additional honors scie
nce course for students
wanting to be better prepared for college level science courses. This course will focus on the following
topics: equilibrium, kinetics, acid/base, aqueous equilibria, thermodynamics, oxidation
-
reduction, and
electrochemistry. AP s
tudents will be required to complete more work independently. All will be
required to continue to develop lab skills, data collection and management, and the writing of lab reports.




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Environmental

Science

743

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Prerequisite: Bio
logy, Chemistry I, and Physics


Elective: Seniors

Environmental Science is an interdisciplinary field
,

and this course is intended as an introductory course
for students with a wide range of potential career goals. The central theme and focus is to unders
tand the
interrelatedness of all living species with the limited biotic and abiotic resources of this planet. The class
will explore the major issues and wrestle with the complexity that characterizes all environmental
problems. An
underlying theme will
be how to
address these challenges from a Christian perspective.
The course will utilize Internet resources and outside reading to supplement the textbook. The course will
also offer standard laboratory experiments and project specific opportunities. Maj
or topics c
overed will be
water, air, soil,
food, and energy.


Physics


757

Credit 1.00

Full Year

Prerequisite:
Chemistry and Algebra II (or currently taking Algebra II)


Elective: Juniors, Seniors

This course centers on the ideas of kinematics and dynamics.
Students will consider the nature of science
while studying scientific models of one and two dimensional
m
otion, force, work, energy,
momentum

and
waves
. The topics will be developed by lecture,
inquiry, problem
-
solving, and experiments. Students

with
the prerequisites who plan to attend a college or university should take this course.


Honors Physics

759

Credit 1.00 (weighted grade)

Full Year


Prerequisite:
Chemistry, Algebra II (or currently tak
ing Algebra II)


Elective: Juniors, Seniors

This course will be a

more in
-
depth Physics course.
The course will require more independent work for
labs, lab reports
,

and problem
-
solving.
Students will consider the nature of science while studying
scientifi
c models of one and two dimensional
m
otion,

force, work, energy,

momentum

and light
.
The
topics will be developed primarily by teac
her
-
facilitated student inquiry
,

including problem
-
solving
and
laboratory investigations.
Students will be responsible for de
signing their own experiments and
dev
eloping their own conclusions.
Those with the prerequisites and planning to attend a college or
unive
rsity should take this course.
This course should be considered a required course for any student
planning on majoring

in science or engineering in college.




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Costa Rica Ecology Field Course

730

Credit: 0.50

(Science credit)

Summer


Prerequisites:
Biology, Chemistry, and two years of Spanish


Elective: Juniors, Seniors


(Required:
min
. of 14 students)

This field course
is taken in the country of Costa Rica (8 days) and includes an introduction and
comparative analysis of a variety of ecosystems in Costa Rica such as rain forests, mangr
oves, and
volcanoes.
Topics include the climates, the history,
and
the relationship bet
ween abiotic and biotic factors.
Students will become aware of the high degree of biodiversity and the specifics of the operation of
general ecological principles in Costa Rica. Studying in the field requires a different process of learning
than a typical

lecture class. In this field study, there are three stages of learning experience: observing,
recording, and processing. This course will be offered every other year
.
Additional fees apply.


Florida Field Study
Course

7
30

Credit: 0.50

(Science credit)

Summer


Elective:
Freshmen, Sophomores,
Juniors, Seniors

This experience will be offered as a summer elective
and
as a field study course
,

with an emphasis on
ecology and environmental science. Students will travel to Florida to explore and investigate a variety of
ecosystems including coral reefs, the Everglades, and dolphin and manatee habitats. Students can earn
both high school and coll
ege credit (up to 3 semester hours with completion of online study). Additional
fees apply.



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Social Studies


Philosophy


We see the work of God’s hand in all the disciplines of social studies. Every teacher of social studies in
the Christian school has
a unique opportunity to prepare students to live as Christians
in society. We do
this best if

two things are true:
first
,

that

we have a Biblical understanding of our world, our society, and
the human condition; and second, that we periodically review th
e changes in our society and world and
redirect our curriculum accordingly.


There are three basic truths that underlie the Christian view of all reality: Creation, Fall, and Redemption.
These truths guide our understanding of the world and the human
condition. We affirm that Christ is the
center of history and that through faith and obedience to Him come renewal and restoration for us, and
our world.


Each of our students must learn that their true purpose in the world and in life is not to be measur
ed by
societal standards, but
rather
in their active role in God’s restoration of the world, where goodness,
justice, righteousness, and peace prevail. The final assessment of our efforts will be the faith
-
commitment
of our students while facing the chall
enges of daily life.



Social Studies Sequence

Level

9
th

10
th

11
th

12th

Required

Western Civilization

U.S. Government


U.S.

History


Honors

Western Civilization




AP


U.S Government

U.S.

History


Psychology


Electives

History of Chicago

Psychology

Sociology


Western Civilization

821

Credit: 1.00

Full Year


Required: Freshmen

This course will survey the nearly 3,000 years of history that have contributed to the formation of Western
Civil
ization. Our study will include an in
-
depth focus on some

of the major political, economic, religious,
intellectual, and cultural milestones of the development of Western Civilization. This course will also
devote considerable time to developing an understanding of the refor
med Christian relationship with and
r
esponse to

the history of Western Civilization.



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Honors Western Civilization

Credit: 1.00 (weighted grade)

823

Elective: Freshmen

Full Year

This course is intended to offer a rigorous history course for Freshmen

interested in taking Advanced
Placement courses in their
sophomore, junior and s
enior years. The course will follow the content of the
regu
lar Western Civilization course

but will provide opportunities to practice and develop skills necessary
for success

in Advanced Placement classes. Accordingly,
students will focus
on reading and interpreting
numerous primary documents, writing theses, and understanding the various approaches to historical
study. Students will also become accustomed to the Free Respon
se Question (FRQ) and the Document
Based Questions (DBQ), both prominent aspects of the AP U
.S.

History course.


U.S. History

833

Credit: 1.00

Full Year


Required: Juniors (unless taking AP U.S. History)

This class is a survey of the major people, events,

and ideas shaping the course of American Histor
y from
the Colonial period through
the present day. Along the way, common themes thr
oughout American
H
istory are investigated. These include the development of religious and political rights, the interactio
n
of races and cultures, immigration, the rise and development of industry and business, social change, and
relations with foreign countries. Students will be engaged in the stories of the United States well beyond
any textbook reading. Film, music, hist
orical simulations, primary documents, and imagery play major
roles in the communication of the significance of American History. The ultimate goal

is to nurture the

Christian mind to understand and
to help

transform the world.


AP U.S. History

835

Credit
: 1.00 (weighted grade)

Full Year


Elective: Juniors

This course, like its regular counterpart, is a survey of the history of the United States. Students who take
this class should expect the equivalent of an introductory college level course. Accordingl
y, students
wishing to take this class should be hardworking and independent learners. This class covers all the same

material as the regular course though in much

more indepth

detail. This Advanced Placement course also
focuses much more heavily on the
writing of historical papers and the reading of primary documents. It is
expected that students taking this class will take the College Board's
AP
exam in early May. High scores
on this test may be honored by colleges and universities as credit towards c
ompletion of the first year. As
a result of taking this class, students will become much more proficient readers, writers, and reasoners.
These skills will be invaluable to success in other high school courses and beyond.


AP U.S. Government and Politics

847

Credit: 1.00 (weighted grade)

Full Year


Elective: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors


Prerequisite: Western Civilization


This course satisfies the CCHS Economics, and the Illinois State Constitution Test requirements.

This introductory college course will

prepare students to take the Advanced Placement exam on U.S.
Government and Politics. Students may receive college credit for the successful completion of this exam.
This course covers topics such as constitutional philosophy, political behavior, mass m
edia and politics,
governmental institutions, civil liberties and the Sup
reme Court, and public policy.
Students will be
expected to analyze documents and express their thoughts in writing.

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American Government

845

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Required: Soph
omores


This course satisfies the Illinois State Constitution test requirement.

This course is an introduction to the form, function, and purpose of United States government and its
political system. Most of the course is spent covering the constitutiona
l foundations of our government,
the campaign and election process, the separation of powers, and the balance between governmental
power and individual rights. Also, students will explore the
implications
of being a C
hristian within a
democratic society
.



Psychology

851

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Elective: Juniors, Seniors

This course is a study of human behavior and is an introduction to the various concepts common to the
field of psychology including learning, memory and thought, perception, motivation
and emotions,
dealing with stress, human interaction, and societal influence on attitudes. Students will explore human
behavior through various experiments, observations, and discussions.


AP
Psychology

852

Credit: 1.00 (weighted grade)

Full Year


Elective: Juniors
, Seniors

This course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental
processes of human beings. From historical methods to social psychology, students will work to master
the same core concepts taugh
t in many college Psychology classrooms. While mastering this information,
students will also consider the central course theme: correct relationships with God, self, and neighbor. In
addition to these course objectives, students will be prepared to pass

the AP exam in May. Throughout
the course, students will be expected to analyze the material in various written assignments, including a
personal journal.


History of Chicago

841

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Elective: Juniors, Seniors

History
of Chicago
will examine the pre
-

and post
-
glacial period of the Chicago area, as well as, the
historical, cultural, and socio
-
economic development of the Chicago metropolitan area. Students will
learn to successfully navigate around the Chicago area and will hopeful
ly develop a desire to travel to
,

and explore
,

this fascinating city. Trips to the city for the purpose of discovery and learning will be an
important part of this course.


Sociology

861

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Elective: Juniors, Seniors

This course is

a study of the important groups in society (family, peer groups, deviant groups, schools,
social movements, minorities, neighborhoods) and how these groups both enrich society and can become
an arena for social conflict. Additional reading beyond the text
book is required in this course.



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Visual Art

Department


Philosophy


Christian education equips our students with the knowledge, skills
,

and attitudes
to work in this world for
harmony
. We are called to be God’s servants and to complete the work He has

begun in creation. God is
sovereign
,

and we recognize that this world belongs to Him. This good earth and all aspects of it are
,

therefore, worthy of study.


The study of ar
t, creating and appreciating it
,

is an essential part of a student’s comprehensi
ve education.
It develops creative thinking and provides the means of self
-
expression and communication. Students are
encouraged to think “outside the box” and consider multiple solutions to problems. An art education
helps teachers promote achievement
across the disciplines, fostering the development of spatial,
mathematical, logical, and physical abilities. Students develop critical thinking skills by being asked to
analyze, synthesize, evaluate
,

and problem solve. A heightened aesthetic awareness an
d sensitivity is
gained as well as the development of an appreciation for the individuality of others. An education in the
arts builds an understanding of diversity and the multicultural dimensions of our world.


Although this is a broken world and the ef
fects of sin have tarnished God’s creation, we know His grace
by being able to respond with delight to things of beauty, variety
,

and design. The study of the visual arts
brings joy to one’s spirit and opportunities to discover who we are as God’s people
in this world and what
our task is in restoring it for Him.



Visual Art

Sequence

Level

9
th

10
th

11
th

12
th

Electives

Art Fundamentals

Art II

Introduction to
Painting

Painting


Electives


Ceramics

Advanced Ceramics


Sculpture and
Printmaking

Electives


Drawing

Drawing II


Note:

Choose one course from
Visual Art
,

Concert Band
,

or Choir

to fulfill
the Fine Arts r
equirement.



Art Fundamentals

222


Credit: 0.50


One Semester


This course satisfies the Fine Arts requirement
.


Elective: Freshmen, Sophomores,

Juniors, Seniors

This introductory course provides students with opportunities to investigate basic concepts and techniques
of visual organization. Students will study the principles of design and the elements of art by solving
problems in a variety of m
edia. Assignments will include drawing and sketching, painting, printmaking,
sculpture, and pottery making. Students will become adept at using the language of art to communicate
their own ideas as well as gaining an understanding of the creative process
es of artists in major works
throughout history and in a variety of cultures.

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Art II

221

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Prerequisite: Art Fundamentals or Instructor Approval


Elective: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

This course offers students the opportunity to

explore a wide variety of materials and subject matter in the
visual arts. Both two
-
dimensional work and three
-
dimensional work will be created using paints,
charcoals, pastels, printmaking materials, clay, and other sculpture material. Students will co
ntinue an
investigation as to how best to use the elements of art combined with the principles of design to
communicate their ideas.


Ceramics

241

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Prerequisite: Art Fundamentals or Instructor Approval


Elective: Sophomores, Junio
rs, Seniors

If you like working with clay and creating three
-
dimensional art forms, you will enjoy this course. Hand
built construction techniques such as coil and slab will be studied as well as learning how to throw pieces
on the wheel. The use of a wi
de variety of decorating techniques will be emphasized so the student puts
their personal and unique stamp on their work. The pottery of other cultures will also be studied.


Advanced Ceramics

242

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Prerequisite: Art Fundamentals
and Ceramics


Elective: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

Any student who has taken Ceramics, enjoyed creating potte
ry, and desires to develop his/her

skills is
invited to take this course. Opportunity will be given to work with slab, coil, and pinch pottery
construction. Students will also be able to spend time working on the potter’s wheel and developing a
more personal approach to pottery and sculp
ture creating.


Sculpture and Printmaking

245

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Prerequisite: Art Fundamentals


Elective: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

Students taking this course will study the principles of 3
-
dimensional design and use these

principles
while cre
ating his/her

own sculptures of a variety of materials. Clay, found objects, mat board, wire and
papier maché are some of the materials which may be used. Relief prints, monoprints, and collagraphs
will also be created as students study the techniques an
d processes of printmaking.




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Introduction to Painting

247

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Prerequisite: Art Fundamentals and Drawing


Elective: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

A wide variety of painting techniques and materials will be used during this studio cl
ass so that the
student will be able to eff
ectively communicate his/her

ideas and thoughts through the use of paints.
Journal writings and keeping a portfolio will also be part of this course’s requirements. Students will gain
a better understanding of t
he visual arts in relation to history and culture and be well prepared to later take
Painting.


Painting

251

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Prerequisite: Art Fundamentals, Drawing, and Introduction to Painting


Elective: Juniors, Seniors

This course will
introduce students to a variety of painting materials including: watercolors,

oil
paintsticks, acrylic paint

and tempera paints. Basic painting techniques will be practiced so that students
will be able to competently communicate their ideas using this m
edium. Subject matter for paintings will
be that of still life, landscape, abstraction, and living things. Students will study paintings from a wide
variety of artists and different areas of the world. Reflections and observations will be kept in a week
ly
journal.


Drawing

252

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Prerequisite: Art Fundamentals


Elective: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

This course is designed to acquaint the student with basic drawing techniques using a wide variety of
materials including: pencil, c
har
coal, oil pastels, color pencil

and mixed media. Students will work from
observation and imagination making drawings of still life, landscape, animals
,

and figures as well as
abstraction. Artists from different time periods and cultures will be studie
d in relationship to the student’s
work. Students will compile a sketchbook throughout the course.


Drawing II

253

Credit: 0.50

One Semester


Prerequisite: Art Fundamentals, Drawing


Elective: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

This course builds on the
techniques and skills the student has developed in Drawing. Students will use a
wide variety of materials and will make more choices regarding content and subject matter so that their art
work is a personal creative statement. Sketches, determined by the

student, will be collected weekly.
Students will study artwork from different time periods and cultures in conjunction with their own
drawings.




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Educational Support Programs


Academic Support Center

High School is a crucial time in a student’s academic career. Students arrive at this point in their lives
with varying levels of ability, skills, and maturity. Our goal in the development of the high school
academic support program is to provide student
s at risk of successes with a level of support that will
assure a positive high school experience.

The high school provides two levels of service:

1.

Implementation of 504 accommodation plans based on learning weaknesses identified through
psychological a
nd/o
r cognitive ability testing;

2.

Daily tutorial support and study skills application
.

Identification:

1.

Teacher/parent/student referral based on performance be
low expected levels;

2.

Individual achievem
ent test scores

which are at le
ast two years below grade level;

3.

Individually administered psychological or cognitive abilities testing which identifies student’s
strengths and weaknesses.

Participation Criteria:

Students for whom a majority of the following criteria apply will be considered
for Academic Support Servi
ces:

1.

Referral

from Middle School ASC program;

2.

Psychological tests identifying areas of weakness that relate to skills

needed in a given subject
area;

3.

Student demonstrates through attitude and use of time a willingness to receive academic support.

Exit Crit
eria

1.

Student achie
vement is demonstrating success;

2.

Student

request to discontinue program;

3.

Student attitude and behavior interferes with benefit of the academic support program.


Response t
o Intervention Program

As we work toward our goal of all students
achieve at high levels, we c
ontinue to be guided by the

questions of a Professional Learning Community.

Question three
(
What will we do if the student has difficulty learning?
)

is the
focus of our “Response to Intervention” Program. In this program we wil
l intervene when
we see
a student

receiving grades below C
-

with opportunities to complete assignments and meet
with teachers for tutoring. These opportunities are during the school day at tutor time and at
“Learning Lunch.”

This consists of
:


a

student spending his/her

lunch period(s) with the supervising teacher
.
(Please bring lunch
from home instead of going to the cafeteria.)


the student does not hav
e to be failing, may be referred

by classroom teacher
;


failing students may also have to atten
d tutoring (determined by weekly failure list)
.

The goals of this program are


to help student

realize that NOT doing assignments is not an option
;


to emphasize the value of homework assignments to learning
;


to encourage students to get work done when assig
ned
.

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FRESHMAN

SOPHOMORE

JUNIOR

SENIOR


Bible

2 credits required

Old Testament

Gospels

Epistles

Christian Church

Bible

2 credits required


English

4 credits required

Intro to
Literature

World Literature

Honors World Literature

American Literature

AP Language &
Composition

Students must choose 1.0
credit from English
offerings

English

4 credits required


Mathematics

3 credits required

Algebra I

Geometry

Honors Geometry

Geometry

Algebra II

Honors Algebra II

Algebra II

PreCalculus

Honors PreCalculus

AP Calculus

Students may choose from
Mathematics offerings

Mathematics

3 credits required

Science

2

credits required

Biology

Honors Biology

Chemistry

Honors Chemistry

Students may cho
ose from
Science offerings

Students may choose from
Science offerings

Science

2

credits required

Social Studies

2.5 credits required

Western Civilization

Honors Western
Civilization

Government

AP Government

US History

AP US History

Students may choose
from
Social Studies offerings

Social Studies

2.5 credits required

Economics

.5 credits required


Economics



Technology

.5 credits required

Technology

.5 credits required

Computer Applications




Economics

.5 credits required

Phys Ed
.

2
.5 credits
required

(1.5 class of 2012)

Health

Physical Education

Physical Education

Physical Education

Physical Education

Phys Ed
.

2
.5 credits required

(1.5 class of 2012)

FineArts

.5 credits required

Art Fundamentals

Band

Choir




FineArts

.5 credits required

Electives

6
.5 credits required

Students must choose 6.5 credits from among courses offered.

Electives

6
.5 credits required


Information for freshmen:

Placement in Math is determined by teacher recommendation and scores on standardized tests. If a
student has successfully completed a required high school course in 8th grade, he/she will be placed in the next course in th
e
sequence; for example, a stude
nt who has successfully completed a year of Algebra will be placed in Geometry. Students are

not

given high school credit for courses taken in middle school.
SEQUENCE OF COURSES

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C
hicago Christian High School

4
-
Year Planner

2012
-
13

Freshman

Old Testament

Computer Applicatio
ns

Introduction

to Literature

Introduction
to Literature

Algebra I

Geometry

Honors Geometry

Algebra I

Geometry

Honors Geometry

Biology or Honors Biology

Biology or Honors Biology

Health

Physical Education

Western Civilization or

Honors Western
Civilization

Western Civilization or

Honors Western Civilization



* Freshm
e
n wishing to take Band,
Choir
, Art
and Spanish may postpone
PE or Computer Applications to another year

Sophomore

The Gospels

Physical Education

World Literature or Honors
World Literature

World Literature or Honors World Literature

Geometry

or Honors Geometry

Algebra II

or
Honors Algebra II

Geometry

or Honors Geometry

Algebra II

or
Honors Algebra II

Chemistry or Honors Chemistry

Chemistry or Honors Chemistry

Government

(
1 sem)

or AP Government (2 sem)


Economics (1 sem)
or AP Government
(2 sem)





Junior

NT

Epistles

Physical Education

American Literature or
AP Language & Composition

American Literature or
AP Language & Composition

US History or AP US History

US History or AP US History

P
re
-
Calculus or Functions, Statistics
& Trig
onometry

P
re
-
Calculus or Functions, Statistics
& Trig
onometry







Senior

The Christian Church

Physical Education


English Elective (4 credits required)

English Elective

(4
credits required)












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