AlaSim International 2012

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Final

Program


AlaSim International 2012


The
Von Braun Center

May 1
-
3, 2012. Huntsville, Alabama, USA


Invited Keynote Speaker:
Rear Admiral Fred Lewis, USN Retired

President,
National Training and Simulation Association (NTSA)


Invited
Luncheon
Speaker:
Leigh Yu

Associate Director, Strategic Initiatives

U.S. Department of Defense
Modeling and Simu
lation Coordination Office



Invited Luncheon Speaker:
Jack Stokes

Human Factors Engineer

NASA Marshal
l

Space Flight Center (Retired)



Invited Luncheon Speaker:
David King

Executive Vice President,
Dynetics, Inc.



Conference
General
Chairman:
Ralph Weber

Dynetics, Inc.



Conference Progr
am Chairman:
Joseph S. Gauthier

Optimization Technology, Inc.



Organized by
The Alabama Modeling and Simulation Council

CONFERENCE REGISTRATION

O
n
-
site
registration
at the Von Braun Center
is held
in the North Hall Lobby
from 8:00a
m to
4
:00pm on May 1, 2012 ,

from 8:00am to 4:00pm on May 2, 2012 and from 8:00am to 10:00am
on May 3, 2012.



GOLD LEVEL SPONSORS

The AEgis Technologies Group

The Boeing Company

SAIC

U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command



SILVER LEVEL SPONSORS

Dynetics

U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Center


PROFESSIONAL SOCIETY CO
-
SPONSORS

Alabama Modeling and Simulation Council (
AMSC)



EXHIBITORS

3SL

The AEgis Technologies Group

Aerial Information Systems Corporation

The Alabama Modeling and Simulation Council

Calytrix Technologies

CFD Research Corporation

Chamber of Commerce of Huntsville/Madison County

Havok Simulation

MAK

Presagis

SAIC

Simulation Technologies

Inc.

Ternion

Corporation

University of Alabama in Huntsville

U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command

CONFERENCE COMMITTEE

The
Alabama Modeling and Simulation

Council (AMSC)

wishes to thank and acknowledge the following
individuals and their respective organizations for their contributions to the success of this conference:


Paul Agarwal, Colsa Corp
oration

Lisa Albert, US Army Materie
l Command

William Atkinson, The Boeing Company

Lamar

Auman
,
U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center

Tom

Barnett
,
U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center

Earl

Barrett
,
US Army Materie
l Command

Ri
chard Butler, The Boeing Company

Georgina Chapman, AEgis Technologies Group

Dan

Coombs
,
U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center

Natalie Darnell,
Delta Research

Keith

Dugas
,
US Army Materie
l Command

Bruce Fairchild, Alaba
ma Modeling and Simulation Council

Peter

Finzel
,
U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center

Bruce

Fowler
,
U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center

(Retired)

Laurie Fraser, US Army Aviation

and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center

Dave

Goldsman
, Georgia Tech

Sharon Hardy,
Missile Defense Agency

Michelle Herman, BFA Systems

John Hughes, BFA Systems

Kevin

Jackson
,
U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and
Engineering Center

Ingyu

Lee
, Troy

University

Jeff

Lyons
,
U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center

Bill Pannell, U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center

Timothy Perkins,
U.S. Army Corps

of Engineers

E. L. Perry, Faulkner
University

John

Regner
, Teledyne Brown Engineering

Bernard Schroer, University of Alabama
in
Huntsville

Nitin

Sharma
,
University of Alabama in Huntsville

Alan Shih, University of Alabama
at
Birmingham

Jeff

Smith
, Auburn
University

Jam
e
s Swain, University of Alabama in Huntsville

Bill

Tucker
,
Simulationist.US Inc.

Lisa Vann, U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command

William Waite, AEgis Technologies Group


CERTIFIED MODELING AND SIMULATION PROFESSIONAL RECERTIFICATION
UNITS

This conference qualifies for Recertification Units (RU’s) for the Certified Model
ing and Simulation
Professional

(CMSP) as administered by the Modeling and Simulation Professional Certification Commission
(MSPCC


www.SimProfessional.org
).


SOCIAL EVENT

Tuesday, May 1, 2012
, 5:00 to 7:0
0p.m.

North Hall Exhibit Area


This will include a cash bar, complimentary non
-
alcoholic beverages, hors d’oeuvres, and snacks. We invite all
Attendees, Sponsors, Exhibitors and guests to join us for informal fellowship and camaraderie.

The Evolving Focus of Modeling and Simulation


Invited Keynote Speaker:
Rear Admiral Fred Lewis
, USN Retired

President,
National Training and Simulation Association (NTSA)

Tuesday
,
May 1
,
2012
, 8:3
0a.m.

North Hall 1


While NTSA has traditionally been grou
nded in the military/national security side of modeling and simulation,
the technology as a whole has been spreading into dramatically new areas over the last decade
--
manufacturing,
healthcare, education and research are all now utilizing modeling and simu
lation. In recognition of this, and of
the challenges facing modeling and simulation as even as it enjoys its rapid proliferation, NTSA convened a
nationwide meeting
--
the National Modeling and Simulation Congress
--
to address these challenges and
opportunit
ies and to unite the M&S community around an action plan to further awareness and utilization of the
technology throughout the American economy. The Charter of this Congress establishes the National Modeling
and Simulation Coalition (NMSC), the body charg
ed with the ongoing effort to a achieve a number of specific
goals as identified by committees in five functional areas: Technology, Research and Development;
Education/Professional Development; Business Practice; Industrial Development; and Communications

and
Outreach.


The Certified Modeling & Simulation Professional (CMSP) program was created approximately nine years ago,
and almost 400 individuals now hold the CMSP credential. A recent major development is the addition of a
second certification track
-

User/Manager
-

and a complete revision of the CMSP exam. The new CMSP exam,
which will consist of randomly generated questions drawn from publicly
-
available, peer
-
recommended source
materials, will be implemented in the next few months. Another major ch
ange is the addition of a second
certification track and a corresponding revision of the CMSP exam structure. Applicants will now have the
option of pursuing either the CMSP
-
Technical or the CMSP
-
Management certification. The CMSP
-
Management track was cr
eated for the community of managers, customers and users of Modeling & Simulation,
who may have a great deal of expertise in M&S, but are not engineers themselves.


RADM Lewis' presentation will focus on the evolving changes of the world of M&S in general
and the above
programs in particular.


Fred Lewis graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in1962 and was designated a naval aviator in November
1963. After an initial tour of duty as a flight instructor, he trained in the F
-
4 Phantom and participated in
nu
merous operational deployments to the Atlantic and Pacific and twice deployed to the Gulf of Tonkin for
combat operations over North Vietnam. Subsequently, he attended the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School and led the
stand
-
up of the Atlantic Fleet’s F
-
14 Flee
t Replacement Squadron.

Several command assignments followed
including his first carrier air wing command when he led the wing in successful operations in the Gulf of Sidra
during which his pilots downed two Libyan fighter aircraft. Various staff assignm
ents in Washington, DC
followed. After which he was given his second air wing command when he inaugurated the Navy’s “Super
CAG” program. Flag assignments including Director, Strike and Amphibious Warfare, Commander, Tactical
Wings, Atlantic, and Command
er, Naval Safety Center followed in quick succession. He was sent back to sea
in 1991 as Commander, Carrier Group FOUR and Commander, Carrier Striking Forces, Atlantic. During a 33
year career, he accumulated over 6,500 accident
-
free flying hours in tact
ical aircraft and over 1,200 carrier
arrested landings.

State of U
.
S
.

D
epartment of
D
efense

M
odeling and Simulation

Invited Luncheon Speaker:
Leigh Yu

Associate Director, Strategic Initiatives

U.S. Department of Defense
Modeling and Simulation Coordination Office

Tuesday, May 1
, 2012, 12:00p.m.

North Hall 3


The Department of Defense
(DoD)
Modeling and Simulation Coordination Office (M&
SCO) is the focal point
for coordinating all matters related to DoD
Modeling and Simulation (M&S)
, and recommends policies, plans,
and programs to the
Under Secretary of Defense

(Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics)

that support the
M&
S Strategic Vision and DoD M&S priorities. How the M&SCO accomplishes this mission and examples of
current activities will be the topic of discussion.


Mr. Yu has over 22 years of experience in modeling, simulation, databases, systems engineering, softwar
e
engineering/development, and project/program management. Highlights include: avionic test station systems
engineering for the F
-
16 fighter; satellite ground station subsystem simulator/emulator systems engineering;
development of a Human Behavior Represe
ntation model using Bayesian networks for the Defense Modeling
and Simulation Office; development of Systems Dynamics models and Genetic Algorithms for the US Air
Force Studies and Analyses Agency; and development of modeling and simulation policy for the
US Air Force.


In his current position, Mr. Yu develops modeling and simulation policy for the Department of Defense,
coordinates outreach activities (including
Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (
STEM
)
,
I
nternational, and Congressional) for
the M&SCO, and is a member of the US delegation to the NATO
Modelling and Simulation Group.


Mr. Yu holds a Certificate in Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence Systems Engineering from
George Mason University, a Master of Science Degree from S
outhern Methodist University in Software
Engineering, and a Bachelor of Science Degree from Case Western Reserve University in Systems and Control
Engineering.



Simulation: A Space Human Factors Engineering Tool

Invited Luncheon Speaker: Jack Stokes

NASA
Marshall Space Flight Center (Retired)

Wednesday, May 2
, 2012, 12:00p.m.

North Hall 3


A visual presentation defining human factors engineering from an aerospace perspective, identifying how
simulation was and is now utilized in NASA aerospace design, and

wraps up with a suggestion for possible
simulation emergence.


A graduate of North Carolina State University with a major in Psychology and a minor in Aeronautical
Engineering. A career civil servant at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Mr. Stokes has

worked on human
factors engineering in such diverse programs as the Apollo Lunar Rover, Skylab, Spacelab, the Hubble Space
Telescope and the International Space Station. He served as a NASA human test subject and from 1975 to 1983
was test integrator for
the Marshall Neutral Buoyancy Simulator, where full
-
length missions requiring space
walks were developed and finalized. He has extensive experience in the NASA Zero
-
G Aircraft and served as a
Skylab motion sickness experiment ground based test subject for

the Naval Aerospace Medical Institute in
Pensacola, Florida. He served as co
-
lead for development of the NASA human factors engineering
requirements document (NASA
-
STD
-
3000).

Space Exploration in Alabama

Invited Luncheon Speaker:
David King

Executive Vice President,
Dynetics.Inc.

Thursday, May 3
, 2012, 12:00p.m.

North Hall 3


Commercial space exploration is an exciting, emerging market in Alabama. Until recently, very
little commercial space
development occurred in Alabama. Instead, space exploration in
Alabama
-

since the dawn of the space age in the late 1950's
-

was focused on large,
government
-
funded programs. However, current fiscal realities coupled with a mature
technological and indu
strial base and a new breed of investors is driving a rapid change in the
landscape. Today, Alabama is a rising leader in commercial space development: Alabama's
own Google Lunar X Prize Team
,

the Rocket City Space Pioneers,

is chasing
after a $20M
purse

to be the first

team to commercial
ly

land
upon and explore the moon.

Paul G. Allen's
ambitious new project to build t
he largest air
-
launched rocket Stratolaunch Systems

is
headquartered in Huntsville. Commercial space is quickly becoming a growth market

for the
Nation and Alabama is playing an increasingly important role.


David King is Executive Vice President and manager of the operating unit, Integrated Systems
and Special Programs, which includes the newly formed Space Systems Division. Mr. King is
a
lso a member of the Dynetics Board of Directors. He joined the company in April 2009. Mr.
King has 25 years’ experience in space systems development and operations and in running
large organizations. He retired from NASA as the center director of the Mars
hall Space Flight
Center in 2009, where he was responsible for overseeing 7,000 onsite employees and
contractors and a $2.7 billion budget.
Mr. King is a former Space Shuttle launch director and
director of shuttle processing at the Kennedy Space Center i
n Florida.


He played key roles in
more than 100 space shuttle missions during his tenure at NASA and led the Columbia
Recovery team following the Columbia accident. He then led the Marshall Space Flight Center
team through “Return to Flight” efforts and
implemented the investigation board
recommendations, including implementing “Technical Authority” for all programs at Marshall.
He also implemented a comprehensive management system for the Marshall Space Flight
Center, enabling informed business decisions

and building a strong management team.


Mr. King has been recognized for his leadership and technical achievements and has been
awarded the National Space Club Goddard Memorial Trophy, the NASA Medal for
Distinguished Service, two NASA Outstanding Leadership Medals and the Distinguished and
Meri
torious Presidential Rank Awards as a career senior executive. He serves on the board of
directors for the Huntsville Chapter of the National Space Club, The Enrichment Center, Kairos
Foundation in Florida and Westminster Christian Academy in Huntsville.

Mr. King holds a
bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of South Carolina and a
master’s in business administration from the Florida Institute of Technology.



* * *
STUDENT ACTIVITIES

* * *


To provide student participants with

a valuable AlaSim International experience, the committee put together a list of activities tailored
for students’ participation. We highly encourage students to participate the “Student Orientation” sessio
n on Tuesday
. This will be an
opportunity for the

AlaSim General Chair to greet and meet student participants from all over the world, and explain some of the
AlaSim activities. This session is also specially designed to enable student networking to form friendships and provide an op
portunity
for collabo
ration beyond their campus boundaries.


Tuesday 10:00 to 12:00.
North Hall 1.

Student Orientation, greetings and refreshments

Tuesday 7:30pm to 9:30pm. No host welcome dinner with conference organizers

at a fine local restaurant

Wednesday 9:00am to 11:0
0am. Exhibit Hall. Future Cities Demonstrations

Wednesday 5:00pm to 7:00pm.
Meet at Registration. Tour of local M&S facility

Thursday 11:30am to 12:00pm. North Hall 1.
Student attendees opinion Survey



FUTURE CITY COMPETITION

WED 9:30 TO 10:30, EXHI
BIT AREA


Alabama Regional Future City Competition 1st Place Winner City name:"Fiume Citta"

School: Academy of Science & Foreign Language (ASFL)
-

Huntsville, Alabama


The Future City Competition is part of National Engineers Week. For the participating
6th, 7th, and 8th grade students, Future City is
a nationwide program that encourages thousands of students to apply math and science concepts through hands
-
on experience
designing a city of the future. The program is an excellent teambuilding experience
that includes modeling & simulation (with
software and physical models), essay development, and public speaking before a panel of judges.


The winning student team from the Alabama regional competition has been invited to demonstrate their city model to th
e AlaSim
International attendees. Please be sure to visit their display.



* * * MILITARY
SESSIONS

* * *


SESSION 10: CYBERSPACE AND SECURITY. SALON
6
.

Session Chairs: Marshall McBride, Claudette C. Owens, U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command


10.1. TUE 10:30 > Quantitative Risk Assessment Model for Software Security in the Design Phase of Software Development


A Case Study

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Idongesit Mkpong
-
Ruffin, Faulkner University

Juan Gilbert, Clemson University

John Hamilton, David Ump
hress, Auburn University


10.2. TUE 11:00 > Modeling Cyberspace’s Impact on the Calculus of Warfare

Steve Pierce, U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Future Warfare Center


10.3. TUE 11:30 > The World of Cyber Modeling and Simulation and Android

Benjamin M
cGee,
Aleta Technologies


10.4. TUE 1:30 > Cyber Hardening from Beginning to End

Marshall McBride, U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command


10.5. TUE 2:00 > Cyber Failure Modes, Effects and Criticality Analysis

Jess Granone, Decisive Analytics
Corporation

Jeremy Kackley, Noetic Strategies



SESSION 11: EXPLOSION DYNAMICS MODELING. SALON
2
.

Session Chair: Ernie Baker, U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center


11.1. TUE 10:30 > High Explosive Products Thermodynamic Equatio
ns of State

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Ernest Baker, Daniel Murphy, U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center

Leonard I. Stiel, Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute of New York University


11.2. TUE 11:00 > Warhead Modeling and Simulation

Jack Pi
ncay, Chuck Chin and Tan Vuong, U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center


11.3. TUE 11:30 > Insensitive Munitions Modeling and Simulation

David Pfau, Daniel Suarez, Irene Wu, U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering C
enter



SESSION 12: LAUNCH DYNAMICS MODELING. SALON
2
.

Session Chair: Donald E. Carlucci, U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center


12.1. TUE 1:30 > Modeling Particle Flow Phenomenon in Small Arms Systems

PEER REVIEWED

PAPER

Laurie Florio, U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center


12.2. TUE 2:00 > Failure and Design Analysis of a 105mm Fin Deployment Mechanism

Robert Terhune, Christopher Stout, U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering
Command


12.3. TUE 2:30 > Predicting the Timing of a Slip Obturator Band Discard

Stephen Recchia, U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center


12.4. TUE 3:30 > Using Co
-
Simulation to Extend Finite Element Analysis

Lyonel Reinhardt, Jenn
ifer Cordes, David Geissler, Pasquale Carlucci

U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center



SESSION 13: ARMAMENTS AND MUNITIONS. SALON
2
.

Session Chair:
Paul Agarwal,
Colsa Corporation


13.1. TUE 4:00 > Personnel Lethality Modeling f
or the Sensor, Warhead, and Fuze Technology Integrated for Combined
Effects Army Technology Objective Program

Allen Pike, U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center


13.2. TUE 4:30 > A Hydrodynamic Comparison of a Spherica
l Bare Explosive Charge Detonating in Open Air to Tests
Conducted on the Free Field Blast Pad

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Greg Stunzenas, Ernest Baker, Adam Enea, U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center, L. Stiel, Brooklyn
Polytechnic Insti
tute of New York University



SESSION 14: SCENE GENERATION. SALON
5
.

Session Chair:
George Wiggs,
U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center


14.1. TUE 4:00 > Utili
zing Graphics Processing Units

for Millimeter Wave Scene Generation

H. DeWayne Satterfield,
Simulation Technologies, Inc.


14.2. TUE 4:30 > Simulated Video for Unmanned Aerial Systems Prototyping, Training and Analysis

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Bob Holcomb, VT MAK



SESSION 15: BATTLEFIELD. SALON
2
.

Session Chair: Lisa Vann, U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command


15.1. WED 8:30 > Framework for Quantification of Evil as a Metric for Course of Action Analysis

Gregory Tackett, U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Resea
rch, Development, and Engineering Center


15.2. WED 9:00 > An Overview of the Utilization of Simulations in the Computation of Hazards to Dismounted Troops

Glenn Romanczuk, U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center


15.
3
.

WED 9
:30 > Enhancing Army Analysis Capability For Warfighter Protection: TRADOC
-
RDECOM Modeling and
Simulation Decision Support Environment Collaboration

Keith Athmer, Maneuver Support Center of Excellence

Chris Gaughan, Army Research Laboratory,

Joseph
S. McDonnell., Robert Leach, Bert Davis , Dynamic Animation Systems

Kiet (“Jeff”) Truong, Effective Applications Corporation

Howard Borum, Richard Leslie, Raytheon Command and Simulations Solutions

Lein Ma, Kinex Inc.


15.4. WED 10:30 > Recreating the
Battle of 73 Easting in a Constructive Combat Model

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

William Daniels and Mikel D. Petty, University of Alabama in Huntsville


15.5. WED 11:00 > Tailoring Data Collection for Evolving Analytical Federations

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Jennifer Le
wis, SAIC

Khoi Do, StackFrame

Michael Salva, The AEgis Technologies Group


15.6. WED 11:30 > Radiance and Transmittance Obscurants Simulation Database

David Bissell, U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center

Joe Manning,
Gleason Research Associates


15.7
. WED 1
:30 > Improving Soldier Threat Detection Skills in Virtual Environments: Two Experimental Approaches

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Jason Caldwell, Jonathan Alt, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Analysis Center


15.8. WE
D 2:00 > Efficient Resource Allocation for the Defense of Spatially Distributed Infrastructure Systems

William Kroshl, Shahram Sarkani, Thomas Mazzuchi, George Washington University,


15.9. WED 2:30 > Space & Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic C
ommand OneSAF Co
-
Development Lab
Activities

John Morash, U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command



SESSION 16: LARGE AND SMALL CALIBER WEAPON MODELING. SALON
2
.

Session Chair: Eric Kathe, U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering
Center


16.1. THU 9:00 > Multiscale Modeling of Thermomechanical Effects on Composite Wrapped Tubes

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Michael Macri and Andrew Littlefield, U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center


16.2. THU 9:30 > Numerical Predic
tion of Blast Overpressure for the US Army 105mm M119A2 Howitzer

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Robert Carson, U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center



SESSION 17: PRODUCTIVITY. SALON
2
.

Session Chair: Matt Harrison, U. S. Army Aviation and

Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center


17.1. THU 11:00 > Successful Collaborative Simulation Development

Matt Harrison, U. S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center


17.2. THU 11:30 > Building an Innovati v
e Simulation Organization

Jeff Maddox, Tim McKelvy, U. S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center



* * * EDUCATION AND TRAINING
SESSIONS

* * *


PANEL 20: MODELING AND SIMULATI
ON IN K
-
12 AND HIGHER EDUCATION

WED 8:30 TO 10:00,
SALON
5
.

Panel Chair: Alan Shih, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Panelist: Jeff Gray, University of Alabama

Panelist: Bharat Soni, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Panelist: Jim Swain, University of Alabama in Huntsville

Panelist:

Lew Bomar, Central Alabama Community College

Panelist: Johnny Moss, Wallace Community College Selma

Panelist: Bruce Tenison, Wallace State College

Panelist: Mikel D. Petty, University of Alabama in Huntsville


Education and research activities in Modeling

and Simulation (M&S) in academia plays a big role is advancing the technologies
associated with M&S, and producing next generation of M&S workforce. Innovations and ideas spawn in a campus can often benef
it
other educators to improve their curriculum des
ign and enhance their degree programs. Exchange of ideas and expertise can also
inspire great collaboration across the campuses. Even the mere sharing of hardware facilities can sometimes bring great mutu
al
benefits and advance education and research pro
cesses. In light of the aforementioned potential benefits, the proposed panel
discussion is aimed to bring educators from the M&S community to exchange their ideas in curriculum design, certificate/degre
e
programs, and research activities associated with
M&S. It is also aimed to provide an opportunity for participants to outline the key
hardware/software resources that they have, to provide a clear picture to all participants how to share the resources, and fo
ment
teaching and research collaborations acro
ss the campus boundaries.



WORKSHOP 21: LEARNING PROGRAMMING AND COMPUTING USING ALICE,

WED 10:30 TO 12:00, SALON
5
.

Workshop Chair: Alan Shih, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Workshop Participants: James Morgan, Danielle Yoder, Daisy Wong, Hannah

Hellwig, Joel Tully
,
Quinton Coley
,
Michael Wyss
,
Dalorion Johnson, Adam Martin
,
Gypsy Abbott, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Jeff Gray, University of Alabama, Shaundra Daily, g8four

Workshop Participants: Danielle Yoder, Daisy Wong, Hannah Hellwig,
Dalorion Johnson, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Jeff Gray, University of Alabama,


Earlier intervention is an absolute necessity regarding the recruitment of women and minority graduate students into the fiel
d of
computing. Studies have provided cl
ear information that waiting until a woman or minority student has graduated secondary school is
often too late to attract them into a specific discipline, or to encourage pursuit of a college education. In a project at U
AB under the
National Science Foun
dation Broaden Participation in Computing (BPC) program, support is aimed to explore a multiple
-
tiered
mentoring model (M3) to introduce concepts and skills of computing and programming through a set of educational tools to stud
ents
at different levels. M
3 proposes to capitalize on the aforementioned context and increase the computing pipeline by providing multi
-
tiered mentoring structures for recruitment and retention of women and minorities at the middle school, high school, and coll
egiate
levels. Alice

(www.alice.org) is an innovative 3D programming environment that makes it easy to create an animation for telling a
story, playing an interactive game, or a video to share on the web. Alice is a freely available teaching tool designed to be

a student's
f
irst exposure to object
-
oriented programming. It allows students to learn fundamental programming concepts in the context of
creating animated movies and simple video games. In Alice, 3
-
D objects (e.g., people, animals, and vehicles) populate a virtual w
orld
and students create a program to animate the objects. In Alice's interactive interface, students drag and drop graphic tiles

to create a
program, where the instructions correspond to standard statements in a production oriented programming language,
such as Java, C++,
and C programs run, enabling them to easily understand the relationship between the programming statements and the behavior o
f
objects in their animation. By manipulating the objects in their virtual world, students gain experience with

all the programming
constructs typically taught in an introductory programming course.


Broadening Participation in Computing: The Multi
-
tiered Approach

J. Gray, M. Wyss, S. Daily, D. Wong, G. Abbott, A. Shih

21.1. >
Using Alice in a Multi
-
tiered
Mentoring Model to Bro
aden Participation in Computing

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Dalorion Johnson
,

Adam Martin

Hero’
s Quest
-

an Interactive Quilt

James Morgan
,

Danielle Yoder

Horse Class Update

Hannah Hellwig

Space Delivery

Hannah Hellwig
,

Quinton Coley



SESSIO
N 22: MIXED REALITY TECHNOLOGY FOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING,

WED 10:30 TO 12:00, SALON
5
.

Session Chair: Michael Remotigue, Mississippi State University


22.1. WED 1:30 > Construction of 3D Disaster Scenarios for First Responder Training on Stereoscopic Dis
play Systems

Alanzo Granville, Alan Shih, University of Alabama at Birmingham


22.2. WED 2:00 > Nursing Education and Simulated Medical Devices

Beth Elias, Jacqueline Moss, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing

Marcus Dillavou, Alan Shih,
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Andres Azuero, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing


22.3. WED 2:30 > nD Visualization & Mixed Reality: Health
-
Care Training & Re
-
Training

Bharat Soni, Jeffrey Kerby, Corey Shum, Marcus Dillavou, Univers
ity of Alabama at Birmingham


22.4. WED 3:30 > CoreVR: Simple Virtual
-
Reality for Visualization, Training, and Education

Corey Shum, Marcus Dillavou, David W Brown, University of Alabama at Birmingham


22.5. WED 4:00 > 3D Visualization for Educational
Content Development

Erin Hennessy, Scott Wehby, University of Alabama at Birmingham


22.6. WED 4:30 > Computational Simulations & Visualization Objects: Education & Training Environments in Two
-
year and
Four
-
Year Application Models

Bharat Soni, University
of Alabama at Birmingham, Lew Bomar, Michael Lovett, Central Alabama Community College

Suzanne Harbin, Bruce Tenison, Wallace State Community College
-
Hanceville

Johnny Moss, Tammie Briggs, Wallace Community College
-
Selma



* * * TRANSPORTATION
SESSIONS
* *

*


SESSION 30: TRANSPORTATION. SALON
5

Session Chair: Virginia Sisiopiku, University of Alabama at Birmingham


30.1. TUE 10:30 > Impact of Projected Growth in Interstate Traffic on Congestion: A Simulation Study

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Michael Anderson, Ber
nard Schroer, University of Alabama in Huntsville

Dietmar Moeller, University of Hamburg


30.2. TUE 11:00 > Traffic Micro
-
Simulation Modeling for an Urban Chemical Disaster

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Scott Parr, Louisiana State University

Evangelos Kaisar, Florid
a Atlantic University

Virginia Sisiopiku, University of Alabama at Birmingham


30.3. TUE 11:30> Modular Approach for the Rapid Development of State Traffic Simulation Models

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Michael Anderson, Bernard Schroer, University of Alabama in
Huntsville

Dietmar Moeller, University of Hamburg


30.4. TUE 1:30 > Pedestrian Scramble: Feasibility Analysis

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Virginia Sisiopiku, Abdul Muqueet Abro, University of Alabama at Birmingham


30.5. TUE 2:00 > Scenario Planning and Bottleneck

Analysis on Intermodal Maritime Transportation Chains in Metropolitan
Hamburg

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Dietmar Moeller, University of Hamburg

Jens Froese, Jacobs University Bremen

Bernard Schroer, Michael Anderson, University of Alabama in Huntsville


30.6. TU
E 2:30 > A Simulation Based Decision Making Approach Developing Dry Ports

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Dietmar Moeller, Leif Dietz, University of Hamburg

Jens Froese, Jacobs University Bremen

Bernard Schroer, Michael Anderson, University of Alabama in Huntsville


3
0.7. TUE 3:30 > A Simulation Based Decision Making Approach in Bunkering

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Dietmar Moeller, Stefan Friedrichs, University of Hamburg

Kevin Cullinane, Edinburgh Napier University

Bernard Schroer, Michael Anderson, University of Alabama in
Huntsville



TUTORIAL 31: MODELING AND SIMULATION IN MULTIMODAL TRANSPORT AND LOGISTICS.

WED 8:30 TO 10:00. SALON
1b

Instructor: Dietmar P. F. Moeller, University of Hamburg


The importance of multimodal transport increases as the economy becomes more and more specialized and globalized. Changes in
business environments such as globalization, production patterns, urbanization and environmental awareness further support th
is
tre
nd. Since production and logistics arrive at a consensus where every individual product or module is produced in regions wher
e the
comparative advantage is the greatest, there is an increased focus on transport and logistic. Traditionally, ports have been
in the focus
as logistic centers of maritime logistics chains, but changes in production patterns are supported by the development of the
rapid
transport of goods over long distances. As a result, the relevance of port hinterland transport, high utilizati
on of transport resources
and infrastructure through the consolidation of goods flows and extending the influence of ports in their hinterlands to incr
ease their
competitiveness has become even more important. This development emphasizes the connection be
tween the intra
-
regional transport
systems and the larger inter
-
regional transport systems, since this is where much of the consolidation of freight flow occurs. The
tutorial will first give a brief introduction to modeling and simulation, the respective
software packages available and the
fundamentals of multimodal transport and logistics. In the second part of the tutorial, case studies with specific focus on
the maritime
and aviation domains will be presented and the results obtained discussed in detai
l.



* * * APPLICATIONS
SESSIONS

* * *


SESSION 40: ENERGY. SALON
6

Session Chair: William Pannell, U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center


40.1. WED 8:30 > Data Driven Demand Management on the Smart Grid

Wes Colley,
Laird Burns, University of Alabama in Huntsville


40.2. WED 9:00 > Enterprise Energy Management

Keith Dickerson, Schneider Electric


40.3. WED 9:30 > Energy Management and Control of Green Power Units Based on Fuel Cells, DC
-
DC Converters and
Ultracapacit
ors

Yuri Shtessel, Roshini Ashok, University of Alabama in Huntsville


40.4. WED 10:3
0

> The True Impact of DoD’s Operational Energy and how Efficiency can be a Force Multiplier

Jason Valenstein. Laura Newberger, Booz Allen Hamilton



SESSION 42: GAMING. SALON
1a

Session Chair: Keith Athmer, Maneuver Support Battle Lab


42.1. WED 10:30 > Toward Intelligent Player Interception in Unreal Tournament

Gregory Reed, University of Alabama in Huntsville


42.2. WED 11:00 > Requirements Analysi
s for an Innovati ve Modeling and Simulation Training System for Wind Tunnel
Control Room

Phillip Jones, MYMIC LLC

Joel Everhart, Jerome Kegelman, NASA Langley Research Center

Laura Stanton, MYMIC LLC



SESSION 43: INFORMATION DYNAMICS, ENTERTAINMENT AND
INTELLIGENCE. SALON
1a

Session Chair: Takeo Nakagawa, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology


43.1. WED 11:30 > Aspects of Opening Play

Apimuk Muangkasem, Hiroyuki Iida, Kristian Spoerer, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology


43.
2. WED 1:30 > Information Dynamics in Go

Hiroyuki Iida, Takeo Nakagawa, Atsushi Hasegawa, Shogo Sone, Apimuk Muangkasem, Hiroaki Wakabayashi, Japan Advanced
Institute of
Science and Technology


43.3. WED 2:00 > Information Dynamics in Soccer

Hiroyuki Iida
, Takeo Nakagawa, T. Nathan Nossal, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology


43.4. WED 2:30 > Digital
-
Kakejiku (Light Art)

Akira Hasegawa, Art University of Hakusan

Hiroyuki Iida, Takeo Nakagawa, T. Nathan Nossal, Apimuk Muangkasem, Japan
Advanced Institute of Science and Technology


43.5. WED 3:30 > Judo and Informati on Dynamics

Hiroshi Minatoya, University of Hakusan

Hiroyuki Iida, Takeo Nakagawa, Taichi Ishitobi, T Nathan Nossal, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

Takashi

Suzuki, Kanazawa Institute of Technology


43.6. WED 4:00 > Super
-
Expert and Computer in Shogi

Kunio Yonenaga, Hiroyuki Iida, Takeo Nakagawa, Toshihisa Okaneya, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology


43.7. WED 4:30 > Certainty of Patient Survi
val

Hiroyuki Iida, Takeo Nakagawa, Shogo Sone, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology



SESSION

44: COMPUTATIONAL INJURY BIOMECHANICS. SALON
1b

Session Chair: Jong
-
Eun Kim, University of Alabama at Birmingham


44.1. WED 3:30 > A Computational
Study on Crash Injury Mechanism of Obese Child Occupants

Chong Tian, Alan M. Shih, R. Shane Tubbs, David B. Allison, Jong
-
Eun Kim, University of Alabama at Birmingham


44.2. WED 4:00 > An In
-
Vivo Finite Element Pelvis Model with Locally Varying Cortical T
hickness

Young
-
Ho Kim, Alan W. Eberhardt, Jong
-
Eun Kim, University of Alabama at Birmingham


44.3. WED 4.30 > Effect of Childhood Obesity on Risk of Pelvic Bone Fracture in Simulated Sideways Fall

Min
-
Heng Hsieh, Bharat K. Soni, David B. Allison,
Jong
-
Eun Kim, University of Alabama at Birmingham



* * * METHODS
SESSIONS

* * *


WORKSHOP 50: VIRTUAL REVIEW OF VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENT CREATED FOR
SIM SMACKDOWN,

TUE 10:30 TO 12:00. SALON
1b
.

Workshop Chair: Dan O’Neil, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center


T
he Virtual Workshop at AlaSim will include a virtual demos, briefings and discussion in Second Life. The voice over IP capab
ilities
of Second Life enable virtual conference rooms, where students' avatars from around the world can sit at the same conferenc
e table to
discuss system interactions, mission scenarios, and the Federated Object Model.



SESSION 51: NUMERICAL METHODS AND MODELING. SALON
6

Session Chair:
David McLaurin, Mississippi State University


51.1.
WED 4:0
0 > Computational Investigation of
Drag Reduction with a Rear Flap on Trucks

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Yangyang Hu, Alan Shih, University of Alabama at Birmingham


51.2
.
WED

4
:
4
0 > Comparison of Lattice Boltzmann and Finite Volume Methods

Young
-
Ho Kim, Roy P Koomullil, Bharat Soni, University of
Alabama at Birmingham

Ram Mohan, North Carolina A&T State University



SESSION 52: SOFTWARE. SALON
1a

Session Chair: Takeo Nakagawa, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology


52.1. TUE 10:30 > Extending ScalaTion, a Domain
-
Specific Language for

Modeling & Simulation, for Simulation
Optimization

Michael Cotterell, John Miller, Jun Han, Tom Horton, University of Georgia


52.2. TUE 11:00 > Virtualization Technology in the Lab Increases Efficiency and Reduces Overhead

Mark McGuigan, U.S. Army Aviati
on and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center



SESSION 53: COMPUTATIONAL GEOMETRY AND MESH GENERATION. SALON
6

Session Chair: Bharat K. Soni, University of Alabama at Birmingham


53.1. TUE 2:30 > Forensic Facial Reconstruction using Comput
ati onal Geometry Approach

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Wenzhen Jia, Alan Shih, University of Alabama at Birmingham


53.2. TUE 3:30 > Automated, Curvature
-
Based Edge Grid Generation

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

David McLaurin, Mississippi State University


53.3. TUE 4:00 > S
olidMesh++: A Framework and Toolkit for Rapidly Prototyping Meshing Tools

Michael Remotigue, David McLaurin, David Marcum, Mississippi State University


53.4. TUE 4:30 > An Octree
-
Based Offset Surface Mesh

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Michael Remotigue, David
McLaurin, David Marcum, Mississippi State University



SESSION 54: HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING. SALON
1b

Session Chair: Lisa Vann, U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command


54.1. WED 1:30 > High
-
performant Micromagnetic Simulations on Central Processin
g Units and Graphics Processing Units

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Dietmar Moeller, Andre Drews, Gunnar Selke, University of Hamburg


54.2. WED 2:00 > Zero Branch Penalty Pipeline Microprocessor Simulation

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Patrick Jungwirth, U.S. Army Research,
Development and Engineering Command


54.3. WED 2:30> OneSAF as a Simulation Service using High Performance Computing

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Christina Bouwens, SAIC

Alesya Paschel, U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command

Amy Henninger, Center for Army Anal
ysis



PANEL 55: HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTERS,

THU 8:30 TO 10
:00. SALON
6
.

Panel Chair:
Christina L. Bouwens, SAIC

Panelist: Larry Davis, Department of Defense High Performance Computing Modernization Program

Panelist: John Tipton, U.S. Army Space and Missi
le Defense Command

Panelist: Daniel Ku, U.S. Army Communications
-
Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center


The panel will explore simulation initiatives using an HPC environment



SESSION 57: METHODOLOGY, THEORY AND PHILOSOPHY. SALON
5

Session Chair: William E. Biles, University of Louisville


57.1. THU 9:00 > Kriging Metamodeling in Multiple
-
Objecti ve Simulation Optimization Using Goal Programming

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Mehdi Zakerifar, Gerald W. Evans and William E. Biles, University of
Louisville


57.2. THU 9:30 > A Model of Competing Ideologies

E. L. Perry, Faulkner University


57.3. THU 10:30 > Estimating Throughput for Unreliable Serial Production Lines with Limited Buffer and Repair Capacity

PEER REVIEWED PAPER

Vamsi Krishna Palivela
, Jeffrey Smith, Auburn University


57.4. THU 11:00 > On a Construction Procedure of Pyramids

Hiroyuki Iida, Takeo Nakagawa, Atsuo Horikawa, Shogo Sone, Apimuk Muangkasem, Taichi Ishitobi

Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology



* * * PROFESSIO
N
SESSIONS

* * *


SESSION 60: VALIDATION, VERIFICATION AND ACCREDITATION. SALON
1a

Session Chair: Gloria Flower
s
, U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command


60.1. TUE 11:30 > Use of Time Series Data in Simulation Validation

Geoffrey Boak, Gigi

Grizzard, Thomas Cromer, Raytheon



TUTORIAL 61: MODEL VERIFICATION AND VALIDATION METHODS,

TUE 1:30 TO 5:00. SALON
1a
.

Instructor: Mikel D. Petty, University of Alabama in Huntsville


Verification and validation are important essential prerequisites to

the credible and reliable use of a model. But what are they exactly?
What are the differences between them? And most importantly, what methods and procedures should be used to perform them? The
tutorial’s first part motivates the need for Verification and

Validation (V&V), provides definitions necessary to their understanding,
and explains why all V&V methods can be understood as comparisons and how this informs their application. The second part of
the
tutorial introduces a taxonomy of V&V methods, define
s categories of methods, and details two or more methods from each category.
The third part of the tutorial examines longer case studies of V&V in practice, showing how V&V methods have been applied (or

misapplied). This material is different from and comp
lementary to some other VV&A tutorials, in that it contains very little about the
"when" and "why" of VV&A and instead focuses on the "how".



TUTORIAL 62: CONCEPTUAL MODELING BEST PRACTICE,

TUE 1:30 TO 5:00. SALON
1b
.

Instructor: William Waite, The AEg
is Technologies Group

Instructor: Gregory Tackett, Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center


With economical efficiency constraints and increased complexity of needs, simulations grow, persist and are reused. Conceptu
al
modeling
is a means to foster interoperability and facilitate life
-
cycle management. This tutorial provides an overview of the
conceptual modeling domain, from fundamentals to applications, from planning to development. Conceptual modeling is presente
d as
a cente
rpiece of a simulation effort, including a complete guide to conceptual modeling process execution and resulting products
supported with examples.



PANEL 63: MODELING AND SIMULATION OF LARGE AND COMPLEX SYSTEMS,

WED 10:30 TO 12:00. SALON
1b

Panel Chair:

Dietmar Moeller, University of Hamburg

Panelist: Mikel D. Petty, University of Alabama in Huntsville

Panelist: William Tucker, Simulationist.US Inc.


Over the past few years dramatic increases in the power of computing systems have presented great
opportunities for increasing the
power and effectiveness of simulations of large and complex systems. Even laptop computers costing a few hundred dollars now
pack
the power that was once limited to supercomputers costing millions. These opportunities come,

however, with significant challenges
often requiring new approaches to modeling techniques, algorithms and analysis, to support of the creation, implementation, a
nd
management of many types of complex system. Meeting these challenges effectively and effic
iently is vital to the future progress and
development of the simulation profession and the essential contribution it is capable of delivering to scientific and technol
ogical
progress.



SESSION

64: STANDARDS. SALON
6

Session Chair: Chris Gaughan, Army R
esearch Lab Simulation & Training Technology Center


64.1. WED 11:00 > The Modeling and Simulation Catalog for Discovery, Knowledge, and Reuse

Brandi Greenberg, Modeling and Simulation Information Analysis Center


64.2. WED 11:30 > Models and Simulations i
n a Service Oriented Architecture
-
Based World

Roger K. Bolton, Mike Kline, John Paulsen, The Boeing Company


64.3. WED 1:30 > Expanded Analysis of the Correlation of Characterizing Attributes and Success in Military Modeling and
Simulation Standards

PEER
REVIEWED PAPER

Mikel D. Petty, Retonya Dunning, University of Alabama in Huntsville

Andrew Collins, Old Dominion University


64.4. WED 2:00 > The Problem of Determining the Financial Implications of Modeling and Simulation Standards

Andrew J. Collins, Davi
d Meyr, Solomon Sherfey, Virginia Modeling, Analysis and Simulation Center

Mikel D. Petty, University of Alabama in Huntsville

Charles D. Turnitsa, General Dynamics IT



WORKSHOP 65: MODELING AND SIMULATION BODY OF KNOWLEDGE INDEX

THU 8:30 TO 12:00. SALO
N
1a
.

Workshop Chair: William Waite, The AEgis Technologies Group


The need and desire for a Modeling and Simulation Body of Knowledge (M&S BoK) Index has been communicated by simulation
professionals and addressed by the SimSummit

organizational members. Early prototypes have been developed to demonstrate
potential features. A set of requirements is being specified to support development of a knowledge management system to supp
ort the
M&S BoK Index. This workshop consists of eff
ort toward a realistic roadmap for implementing the M&S BoK Index using iterative
refinement. The crawl/walk/run strategy recommends leveraging currently available web applications to support early versions
.
Effort will address identification and executi
on of work related to: implementing the technical solution, encouraging content
development, obtaining resources to populate and manage content, and cultivating the M&S community of practice to use and
continually improve the M&S BoK Index product in the c
ontext of an open source collaborative enterprise.



TUTORIAL 66: CERTIFIED MODELING AND SIMULATION PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM OVERVIEW,

THU 10:30 TO 12:00. SALON
1b
.

Instructor: Ralph Weber, Dynetics, Inc.

Instructor: William Tucker, Simulationist.US Inc.


Th
is tutorial will familiarize the attendee with the benefits of this program, which is endorsed by Alabama Modeling and Simula
tion
Council (AMSC). The attendee will learn about the newest developments in the Certified Modeling And Simulation Professional
(
CMSP) program, and how these improvements will provide benefits to the modeling and simulation (M&S) community. We will
discuss the newly adopted CMSP testing scheme and its availability. Also to be discussed is the role and importance of the C
MSP
program

in the broader context of M&S professional development.



PANEL 67: MULTI
-
DISCIPLINARY SIMULATION
-
BASED DESIGN,

THU 10:30 TO 12:00. SALON
6
.

Panel Chair: Roger Dougal, University of South Carolina

Panelist: Michael Schexnayder,
WYNners LLC, GRA, Inc.

Pa
nelist: Dietmar Moeller, University of Hamburg


Modeling and simulation (M&S) has been designated as “one of the key enabling technologies of the 21st century” but much need
s to
be achieved in M&S technology if this promise is to be fully realized in the e
xtent to which it supports the design of complex, multi
-
disciplinary engineering systems. One of the major obstacles to meeting this challenge is the need for effective design tool
s capable of
supporting multidisciplinary, collaborative, simulation
-
based
design. The design landscape currently offers a variety of different
tools, most of which target a limited disciplinary area. The design of complex, multidisciplinary systems requires a more in
tegrated
approach that allows designers from different discip
lines to work together in a collaborative, multi
-
disciplinary simulation
-
based
design environment.



SESSION 70: POSTER PRESENTATIONS

TUE 3:00 TO 6:00. NORTH HALL EXHIBIT AREA


70.1

>
Obstructive Sleep Apnea Study Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

Jacob

Nelson, University of Alabama at Birmingham


70.2. >
Parallel Particle
-
in
-
Cell Code Simulation of Space Weather Phenomena using a Graphics Processing Unit

Patrick Gilbert, Scotty Bridges, Frank Richard, Jason Schansman, University of Alabama in Huntsville