Fall 2010 - 3 Credits - Great Basin College

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1

Great Basin College

Molecules and Life in the Modern World


CHEM 100

Section
I
01


Fall

20
10

-

3 Credits


Instructor

Caroline R Bruno

Phone

775
-
753
-
2204

Office

Lundberg 109D

E
-
mail

WebCampus

Office Hours

T,
Th 8:0
0am
-
9
:30am

Th
1
:30
pm
-
3
:30
pm


Online Course



Text:

Chemistry in Context: Applying Chemistry to Society, 6
th

edition

A Project of the American Chemical Society

McGraw
-
Hill

ISBN
-
978
-
0
-
07
-
304876
-
5

Catalog Description:

Introduction to chemistry in its many forms and applications, physical and organic, with
consideration of environmental and social issues. Includes online laboratory activities. Prerequisite:
MATH 096 or higher.

Cou
rse Description:

This is an introductory course in chemistry that may be used either as an introduction before
moving on to higher levels of college chemistry or as a fulfillment of general science credit for any
degree. The general headings of topics to be covered include

measurement, the structure and
naming of atoms and compounds, the construction and use of the periodic table, chemical
reactions, stoichiometry, gases, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry

-

with an emphasis on
chemistry in the environment
. A more spe
cific outline of the topics to be covered and the tentative

schedule for the semester is attached. The outline should be considered a general guide only and
not an absolute schedule.


Objective:

The primary objective of this course is for students to under
stand concepts and interrelationships
involving chemical phenomena. With this understanding in hand, it is hoped that the student will
then use this understanding in problems of every day occurrence or move on to a higher level of
chemistry with more depth

in problem solving and more laboratory experience. It is also an
objective of this course that the students understand the scientific method and its role in problem
solving. The
imbedded
laboratory exercises will show students the use of the scientific me
thod and
how mathematics can be applied for consistent, reproducible evaluations of problems.


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2

Method of Instruction:

This is a fast
-
paced,
rigorous

internet course.


PowerPoint Presentations available on WebCampus
coincide with assigned reading material
in the text and add clarification and examples to the
material in the text.





Learner Outcomes and Measurement:

Expected Learner Outcomes

Measurement

Solve problems using the scientific method
.

Lab reports

Demonstrate how chemistry is used to
understand and explain
many of today’s
environmental problems.

Lab

reports
, Chapter Quizzes

Chemically analyze current and potential
energy sources.

Chapter Quizzes

Analyze how chemistry is
applied

in
the
development
of medicines, plastics and
polymers.

Chapter Quizzes
.

Analyze the chemistry of nutrition.

Chapter Quizzes

Analyze various types of chemical reactions

L
ab reports, Chapter Quizzes

Demonstrate and analyze how genetic
engineering is used in our society.

Chapter Quizzes

Calculate empirical and molecular formulas

Lab reports, Chapter Quizzes

Calculate chemical quantities

L
ab reports and
Chapter Quizzes

Evaluation:

Chapter Quizzes
:

Students are required to complete quizzes associated with each chapter.
Generally, quizzes will
be available on T
uesdays

through Sundays.
Quiz availability will not be extended under any
circumstances.

Take quizzes from a computer with a
speedy and reliable

internet connection.
Immediately contact the GBC Helpdesk if techni
cal problems arise.


Lab:

Four labs will be completed by students in the comfort of their own kitchens!

The lab reports are
"gateway" requirements for this course; to receive a passing grade in this course, all labs must be
handed in and receive a pass
ing grade (A, B, or C). If any of the four labs are not handed in or do
not receive a passing grade,
a failing grade will be issued for the course
. If any lab is handed in but
does not receive a passing grade, the student will have one week to revise the l
ab to a passing
grade (C only). If a lab is handed in late, the highest grade possible is a 70%. For every additional
day the assignment is late, the highest possible percentage will drop by 10%.

You may conduct
the experiment with a fellow classmate,
bu
t you must write your own lab report and display and
format your data independently.





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3

Recommended ‘End of Chapter’ Questions
:

Your success in this course depends on
active participation

and
active learning
. At the beginning
of each chapter, your professor will provide a list of recommended ‘End of Chapter’
(EOC)
questions. Although these questions will not be graded, careful and accur
ately completion

is
necessary for success, as these questions wil
l be sim
ilar to
quiz

questions. Answers to the
‘End of
Chapter ‘
questions will be posted online for students to review.


Most of the EOC questions
selected by your instructor will be quantitative (involving calculations) but keep in mind the student
is responsib
le for all content in each chapter.


Grading:

Grading will be based on
the Chapter quizzes

and
four lab reports
. All scores will be added
together at the end of the semester, and the percentage of the total possible points will determine
the grade.

Extra

credit opportunities are not available.



Grades will be based on the following divisions:


A

95
-
100%

A
-

90
-
94%

B+

87
-
89%

B

84
-
86%

B
-

80
-
83%

C+

77
-
79%

C

74
-
76%

C
-

70
-
73%

D+

67
-
69%

D

64
-
66%

D
-

60
-
63%

F

<59%



A student may receive a “W” grade
only if withdrawal occurs before the end of the thirteenth week
of the semester
. To withdraw, the student must inform the instructor verbally or in writing why the
withdrawal is taking place, and must formally withdraw through student services. Anyone wh
o
does not formally withdraw and does not complete the course will receive an ‘F’ grade. ‘I’ grades
for ‘incomplete’ will be given only
under the most extenuating circumstances
, and only with the
prior approval of the instructor.


Attendance Policy:

It is important to log into the class frequently to stay up to date with reading, assignments and
exams.
It is the student’s responsibility to complete
quizzes

and turn in
labs
on
time.


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4

Hints for Success:



In order to pass this course you
MUST

actively p
articipate in your
education and study!



Keep up to date on reading.



Although not required, be sure to complete all of the ‘Your Turn’ questions
throughout the chapter. These question s will help you prepare for the
‘End of Chapter’ Questions and quizzes.



Although not required, t
ake
the recommended ‘End of Chapter’ Questions

seriously; they will help you prepare for exams!



ASK

questions if you are confused.

Your professor wants to HELP you!



Additional Course Information:



The instructor will reply to
WebCampus emails during posted office hours.
If you have an urgent question requiring a timely response during school
hours, call the instructor directly at 775
-
753
-
2204.



In case your book hasn’t arrived by the start of semester, the first
two

chapters
on the schedule are available via WebCampus.



If you are unable to secure a book by the end of the
third

week of class,
the instructor recommends withdrawing from the course and taking it
another semester.



Technical problems with WebCampus need to be addres
sed to the GBC
Helpdesk.



Extra credit opportunities are
NOT

available.

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5

Student Conduct Policy:

Students are expected to follow the Student Conduct Policy for students in the Nevada System of
Higher Education (NSHE) outlined
in the

GBC Catalog.

S
tudents will specifically be held
accountable for behaving in a civil and respectful manner toward other students and the
professor in
all

communications
.


The college catalog states, “Messages, attitudes, or any other form of communication deemed to
be
outside the bounds of common decency/civility as judged by common standards of classroom
behavior (determined, as they would be in a regular classroom, by the instructor) will not be
tolerated” (29).

Pay particular attention to those last four words. Any s
tudent who behaves rudely to another
student or to
the instructor

will be dropped immediately.


Academic Honesty:


Academic dishonesty, in any form, such as, cheating and plagiarism, will not be tolerated by the
instructor AND Great Basin College.


Acade
mic dishonesty can result in failing the class, academic
suspension, or expulsion.


All tests, quizzes, laboratories, and other assignments must be the
student’s OWN work.

Plagiarism is presenting someone else’s word, ideas or data as one’s own.


When a s
tudent submits work that includes the words, ideas, or data of others, the source of that
information must be acknowledged through complete, accurate, and specific references; and if
verbatim statements are included, through quotation marks as well.


In ac
ademically honest
writing or speaking, the students will acknowledge the source whenever:



Another person’s actual words are quoted



Another person’s idea, opinion or theory is used, even if it is completely paraphrased in
the student’s own words



Facts, stat
istics, or other illustrative materials are borrowed, unless the information is
common knowledge

Students with Disabilities:

The college catalog states, “Great Basin College is committed to providing equal educational
opportunities to qualified students wi
th disabilities in accordance with state and federal laws and
regulations, including the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504 of the
Rehabilitation Act of 1973. A qualified student must furnish current verification of disability. The AD
A
Officer, located in Berg Hall, will assist qualified students with disabilities in securing the appropriate
and reasonable accommodations, auxiliary aids, and services. For more information or further
assistance, please call 775.753.2271” (36).




Page
6

CHEM

100

Course Schedule

for Fall 20
10
:

Not a contract:
This document does not in any way constitute a contract. It is only a summary of how the
professor

expects the course to proceed. In may be changed by the
professor
.

Week

Topic
s and Important Dates

Chapter Quizzes and
Important Dates

1

Aug 29

Chapter 1
: The Air We Breathe


2


Sept 5

Chapter 1
: The Air We Breathe

Ch. 1 Quiz available

T
uesday

Sept
7
-
Sunday Sept 12

3


Sept 13

Chapter 2
:

Protecting the Ozone Layer

Ch. 2 Quiz available

T
uesday

Sept 1
4
-
Sunday Sept 19

4


Sept 19

Chapters 3
: The Chemistry of Global
Warming


Ch. 3 Quiz available

Tuesday Sept 21
-
Sunday Sept 26

5


Sept 26

Chapter 4
: Energy, Chemistry, and
Society


Lab #1

Due Thursday, September 30

Ch. 4 Quiz available

Tuesday Sept 28
-
Sunday Oct 3

6


Oct 3

Chapter 5
: The Water We Drink

Ch. 5

Quiz available

Tuesday Oct 5
-
Sunday Oct 10

7


Oct 10

Chapter 6
: Neutralizing the Threat of
Acid Rain

Ch. 6

Quiz available

Tuesday Oct 12
-
Sunday Oct 17

8


Oct 17

Chapter 7
: The Fires of Nuclear Fission

Ch. 7

Quiz available

Tuesday Oct 19
-
Sunday Oct 24

9



Oct 24

Chapter 8
: Energy from Electron
Transfer


Lab #2

Due Thursday, October 28


10



Oct 31

Chapter

8
: Energy from Electron
Transfer

Ch. 8

Quiz available

Tuesday Nov 2
-
Sunday Nov 7

11

-

Nov 7

Chapter 9
: The World of Plastics and
Polymers

Ch. 9

Quiz available

Tuesday Nov 9
-
Sunday Nov 14

12

-

Nov 14


Chapter 10
: Manipulating Molecules
and Designing

Drugs


Lab #3

Due Thursday, November 18

Ch. 10

Quiz available

Tuesday Nov 16
-
Sunday Nov 21

13



Nov 21


Chapter 11: Nutrition: Food for Thought


Course Drop Deadline
November 2
6

Ch. 11

Quiz available

Tuesday Nov 23
-
Sunday Nov 28

14



Nov 28

Chapter 12:

Genetic Engineering


Lab #4

Due Thursday, December 2


15
-
Dec 5

Chapter 12: Genetic Engineering


16
-
Dec 12


Final Quiz on Chapter 12

Different DATES!!

Tuesday Dec 7
-
Tues Dec 14

Page
7

Substantiation of the Incorporation

of

the General Education Objectives into Chemistry 100


Communication Skills (strong component): Four complete lab write
-
ups on quantitative
investigations (following the format of scientific investigation) are required.

Students are
encouraged to communica
te via email or other means with
other
students and the instructor to
discuss concepts covered in reading material and
labs
.


Critical Thinking (strong component):

Quantitative Ability (significant): Laboratories specifically require measurement,
mathematic manipulation of the data, and the creation of graphs.
Labs and
quizzes

will include
dimensional analysis which r
equires mathematic manipulation.


Reasoning and
Independent Thought (significant): All lab exercises require reasoning and
independent thought based on the interpretation of both qualitative and quantitative information.
Students will be required to formulate conclusions in written laboratory reports us
ing the scientific
method. Many
quiz
questions require reasoning taken from the understanding and application of
chemistry, not just the memorization of terms.


Scientific Understanding (significant): All principles taught in this course are based on
scie
ntific reasoning. Interpretations are based on facts. The lab introduces the use of the scientific
method and the use of both observational and quantifiable facts in its application.


Personal and Cultural Awareness (moderate component):

Sense of the Indi
vidual in Society (some degree): This objective is also reflected under the
“Sense of Accountability” objective below. Different social attitudes toward the use of chemicals in
different cultures and industry are reviewed.

Quizzes

will require students to

demonstrate how
consumer choices impact the chemistry of environmental problems.


Sense of the Past (moderate): The nature of the atom has been of interest to scientists
since the 1800s. This class will examine various models of the atom developed from t
he late 1800s
through the present.
Lectures will

review notable experiments and people involved with the
development of chemistry as a science.


Sense of Accountability (significant): A common theme throughout much of this course is
the interaction betw
een humans and nature, and the personal and social consequences of these
interactions. We discuss ethical and societal issues and needs relating to the use of industrial

chemicals and the environment.
Quizzes

will require students to demonstrate how consu
mer
choices impact

the chemistry of environmental problems.


Appreciation of Fine Arts (some degree): The use of chemicals in art restoration is a hot
topic. For example, during the 1980’s and 1990’s, the cleaning and restoration of The Sistine
Chapel cr
eated controversy in the art community because many art historians believed that the
cleaning destroyed and/or distorted Michelangelo’s original work.

The chapter 6 quiz

will require
students to demonstrate their knowledge of acid rain degradation to scul
ptures.

Page
8

Personal Wellness (
significant
):

Personal safety is considered in the discussion of laboratory safety and chemical hazards.
Many of
the environmental issues discussed in lecture, such as the chemistry of the ozone layer, the
chemistry of water, an
d the chemistry of air, directly impact personal wellness.

Quizzes

will require
students to demonstrate their knowledge of how the chemistry of environmental problems may
impact their health.


Technological Understanding (moderate):

Laboratory reports and

homework assignments will be produced using appropriate word
processing and spreadsheet so
ftware. Students will use WebCampus

to access class materials.