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DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL SCIENCES

COURSE SYLLABUS

GENERAL PHYSICS

I
, II

(
PHYS160
,

PHYS161
)


COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This is a two
-
semester sequence of

algebra
-
based, introductory physics with laboratory.


Prerequisite:


Required: Pre
-
calculus
-

A
lgebra and
trigonometry will be used extensively in this course.

Recommended but not required: High school physics or a one semester conceptual college course like
PHYS110


Catalogue
D
escription
:

Introduction to the general physical principles in the fields of
mechanics, heat, sound, light,
magnetism, electricity, atomic and nuclear physics, and problem solving techniques.

P
rerequisite:
Math 201, or the equivalent
; PHYS160 is
a

prerequisite

for

PHYS161. 3 hrs. lect.
3 hrs. lab per semester. 4 crs. per semester
.


To be
tter

prepare our students, who are
all
taking this course
as a preparation for a

careers in the
life
or

health sciences, the
course goals
and student learning outcomes
are
guided by the

recommendations made
by
the National Research Council in

the
Bio2010

report and th
e pre
-
med
competency recommendation
made by

the
A
merican Association of Medical Colleges

in the
AAMC
-
HHMI Scientific Foundations for Future Physicians



COURSE GOALS:


Scientific Inquiry



D
evelop

a
practice of creative inquiry

into the physical basis of natural phenomena



Develop observational and interpretive skills through hands
-
on laboratory



Experience h
ow measurements are used to elucidate and validate scientific discovery



Use up
-
to
-
date measurement techniques for basic
physical quantities


Interdisciplinary Thinking



A
bility to make c
onnections between biology and the physical sciences
is
developed and
reinforced so that
i
nterdisciplinary thinking becomes second nature


Quantitative Reasoning



Facility with the

kinds of functional relationship
s
among physical quantities that
are
prevalent
in the natural world



C
reate and use
mathematical
models



Create and interpret visual displays of data


Basic Physical Principles



R
ecognize basic physical principles in
a var
iety of
natural
processes

at different scales,
from the molecular to the
organismal
.




I
nternalize sense making sufficiently to be able to
a
pply
f
oundational
principles

of
change and interaction
to the understanding of living systems.


Synergy



B
e able to
apply multiple physical principles to more complex natural process
es
, as
is
typically
manifest

in living systems.


Communication




Be able to discuss physical phenomena using appropriate physics terminology



Be able to articulate sense
-
making in discussion
of physical processes in nature



STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:


Quantitative Reasoning

1.


Express and analyze natural phenomena in quantitative terms that include an understanding
of the natural prevalence of basic functional relationships



Proportional
relationships



Linear relationships



Quadratic relationships



Inverse relationships



Inverse square relationships



L
ogarithmic/exponential relationships



Periodic

relationships

2. Use of units of measurable quantities; dimensional analysis and unit conversion

3.
Identify functional relationships from visually represented data



Interpret graphical representations of data

o

Physical meaning of



Slope



Area under curve



Y
-
intercept



Describe graphical functional relationships in mathematical form



Interpret frequency
spectrums


Draw and

i
nterpret Visual display of



Vectors

o

Motion Diagrams

o

Free
-
body diagrams

o

Extended body diagrams



Vector fields

o

Electric fields

o

Magnetic fields

4.

Modeling



Be able to mathematically model pertinent aspects of a natural phenomenon in terms
of

functional relationships of measurable quantities



Make inferences about natural phenomena using mathematical models



Be able to articulate in words what relationships
a
mathematical model is
e
xpressing



Be able to discuss limitations of models
, the simplifications and approximations
made, and the temporal and spatial
scale in which it is relevant.

5
. Quantify and interpret changes in dynamical systems



Kinematics



Biomechanical dynamics

• Exponential growth and decay



Damping



Capacitance circ
uits



Radioactiv
e decay



Oscillations

o

Simple harmonic motion



Resonance



Waves



Electric circuits



Electromagnetic Induction



Waves


Scientific Inquiry

1.

Demonstrate

creative inquiry

into the physical basis of natural phenomena

2.

De
monstate

observational and interpretive skills



Hands
-
on activities in
virtually
every class



Bodies
-
on activities using kinesthetic sense

3.

Operate basic laboratory instrumentation for scientific measurement or field experiences.



Computer
-
acquisition and analysis of

data using:

2D Force Plates, Force sensors, Motion sensors, 3 D accelerometers, goniometers,
temperature sensors, pressure sensors, sound sensors, voltage and current sensors,
magnetic field sensors, light sensors, UV sensors, infrared sensors, Geiger Cou
nter
sensor



Video analysis of visibly dynamic phenomena



Optic s benches, multimeters,

4.

A
rticulate reasoning to explain or question data.

5.

R
aise scientific questions and hypotheses, design experiments, acquire data, perform data
analysis, and present result
s.



G
uided inquiry
during class



S
tudent projects

6.

Demonstrate the ability to search effectively, to evaluate critically, and to communicate and
analyze the scientific literature
.



Literature search and review as part of student
project.


B
asic physical princi
ples

1.

Demonstrate understanding of mechanics as applied to
living

systems

• Understand the interrelationships among work, energy, force, and acceleration.

o

How you move objects

o

How you get moved by objects
(
as a passenger
)

o

How you move yourself (locomotion)


Understand the

interrelationships among rotational work, rotational energy, torque, and
angular acceleration

o

How engagement of your muscles moves your limbs

• Apply knowledge of mechanics to movement in biological sy
stems at various scales,
from the molecular to the organismal.

o

How your limbs enable you to move objects and move yourself

o

How

food energy i
s

converted

i
nto muscular
work


1.

Demonstrate knowledge of the principles of electricity and magnetism and its applica
tion to
biological systems



Electrical forces, fields and potential:

o

Endogenous:
c
ell membrane,
a
ction potentials,
epithelial
, intracellular

o

Electrocytes and electric field detection by fish

o

Electrostatic basis of chemical structure and function

o

Diagnostic


ECG, EMG, EEG

o

Therapeutic


Wound healing
, electroporation, ionosphoresis, defribillation



Electric
current and
circu
i
ts



Nerve conduction



Resistivity
/Impedance

of bodily tissues,
GRS
, body fat composition




Electrical Safety
:

household and thera
peutic



Magnetism and Electromagnetic induction

o

Diagnostic and therapeutic techniques using magnetism
: MRI, bone repair

o

Endogenous magnetic fields of living systems

o

Magnetic sensing by animals

o

Electrical power generation



E
lectromagnetic waves

o

Natural and manmade
sources

and receivers at all scales of the spectrum


3. Demonstrate knowledge of wave generation and propagation
and the application
to
living
systems



Matter Waves

o

Sound, Hearing, and Speech

o

Diagnostic and Therapeutic Ultrasound



Electr
omagnetic Waves

o

Bodily effects at all scales in the electromagnetic spectrum

o

Diagnostic
,

therapeutic
, and research

uses at all scales in the spectrum

o

In everyday human use



G
eometric optics

o

I
mage formation in the eye

and in microscopes

o

Fiber optics in medi
cal scopes



W
ave optics

o


I
mage resolution in the eye

and in microscopes

o

X
-
ray d
iffraction

for biomolecular structure determination


4. Demonstrate knowledge of the principles of thermodynamics and fluid motion and the
application to functional properties
of tissues and organisms. .



Heat transfer
mechanisms
and
role of evaporation in the body



Entropy, life, and energy efficiency



Fluids and
Pressure
s

in the Body



Blood pressure and vascular b
lood flow



Lung pressures and breathing



Random Walks, Diffusion, and
Osmosis



Effect of temperature on enzymes activity



Metabolic rate and caloric requirements


5. Demonstrate knowledge of principles of quantum mechanics

and
nuclear physics and the

application to
biological systems
.




Wave particle duality as a basis for a
tom
ic and molecular energy levels and

orbitals

in

biochemical structure and function,



Quantum basis of

biomedical investigative
tools
-

s
pectroscopy
, lasers
, MRI




A
tomic/molecular energy levels
and the origin of light and ionizing radiation



I
nteraction of electromagnetic radiation
with atoms and molecules of living systems
.



Radioactivity
-
i
sotopes as biological tracers



Biological effects of nuclear radiation



Nuclear fission and fusion for educated citizenship



Synergy of principles in complex

living systems


(
Selected
Examples)


1.

P
hysical basis of biochemical processes



Apply

principles of electrostatics
,

quantum mechanics
, and thermodynamics

to
:



I
onic
and covalent
bonding
,
V
an derWaals interactions, hydrogen bonding



H
ydrophobicity and
hydrophilicity driv
ing

molecular association
.



Structure of biological macromolecules and the effect of structure on properties.



Biosynthesis: DNA, RNA transcription, s
elf assembly
,

protein folding



E
nergy

stor
age

in
fatty acids and
ATP

and

the

transduc
tion to
functional

activity



Spontaneity of biochemical processes


2.

P
hysic
al

principles
applied
to

the function of cell
s
,

tissues,
organs, and organisms
.

o

Explain
physical basis of

aspects of

cellular

function
:


o

Energy conversion and metabolism

o

Membrane structure and function

o

Cell transport and storage

o

Molecular motors, muscle contraction and cell motility

o

Cell cycles and cell death

o

E
xplain
physical basis of
functional properties of tissues and organs.

o

Organization of multi
-
cellular organisms,
systems biology

o

Elasticity/Injury of Body Tissues

o

Respiratory System

o

Circulatory System

o

Nervous System

o


Apply physics principles to
biomechanics

and exercise

o

F
ood energy
conversion

i
nto muscular
work

o

Gait analysis

o

Biomechanics to optimize sports technique

o

Exercise equipment design for optimal muscular engagement

o

Ergonomic considerations

in human movement


3.

Explain
the physical basis of the mechanisms by which

organisms sense and control their
internal environment
,

sense
and respond to
their
external e
nvironment
.



Energy in
b
odily processes



Homeostasis, feedback



Thermal
r
egulation of the
b
ody



Vestibular apparatus
-

Balance



Reception and tr
ansduction of
receptor
signals



Eyes and
Vision



Ears and
Hearing



Cutaneous receptors and proprioceptors



Signaling
-

Inter
-

and intracellular communication



4.

Explain the physical basis of

possible mechanisms

of
occupational and
physical therapy

modalities

o

Traction

o

Electrical Stimulation


biofeedback, repatterning, muscular strengthening, tissue repair,
pain management
,

wound healing

o

Therapeutic heat and cold

o

Therapeutic ultrasound

o

Laser light therapy

o

Transdermal drug delivery (ionphoresis and phonophoresis)

o

Vibration/Rhythm (rocking, swinging, vibration plate)

o

Aquatics and
hydrotherapy


5.

Apply physics principles to medic
al treatment and

diagnostic tools



Imaging (ultrasound, x
-
rays, Cat scan, MRI, infrared, radioactive tracers, PET)



Surgical or tumor destruction (cauterization, laser, gamma knife, electroporation)



Nuclear medicine



Function replacement (heart, limb, joint)



Electrical (ECG, EMG, EEG, GRS, nerve conduction)


6.

Apply physics principles to

biomedical
and biophysics

research techniques



Electrophoresis, chromatography, DNA analysis



Voltage dyes, ion patch clamp



Fluorescent microscopy



Centrifuge



Atomic force
microscopy



Optical tweezers



Spectroscopy


7.

Apply physics principles to health field specializations

o

Dental

o

Decay detection

o

Ultrasonic cleaning

o

Chewing mechanics , TMJ

o

Tooth damage and repair

o

Veterinary

o

Distinctive animal locomotion and physiology

o

Distinc
tive animal communication

o

Distinctive sensing; p
rey detection
, magnetic sensing

o

Extreme environment coping mechanisms


8.

Apply physics principles to living on the earth, in the modern world

o

Climate effects, atmosphere, global warming, hurricanes, tornados, e
arthquakes

o

Electromagnetic effects: Lightning, magnetic storms, man
-
made electromagnetic fields,
polar
auroras
, earth’s magnetic and electric fields

o

Electrical appliances and computer devices

o

Sh
elter/clothes

o

Transportation

o

Communication


9.

Apply physics
principles to consider possible mechanisms for alternative a
n
d complementary
wellness approaches



Acupuncture



Bodywork (massage, cranial sacral, chiropractic, reflexology, structural integration,

applied kinesiology
, Reiki, therapeupic touch, dance
)



Somatic techniques (yoga, qiqong, tai chi,
Gyrotonic, Alexander, Feldenkrais,
pilates
)




Mind/Body (visualization
, prayer, hypnosis, meditation, humor/laughter, placebo effect)



Sound (music therapy, bi
-
aural entrainment, chanting)



Electromagnetic ( magnets
, bio
-
field imaging, electrodermal testing, bioresonance, earth
grounding)



Light (full spectrum, laser, color)



Accredited alternative health disciplines (naturopathy, osteopathy, oriental medicine)



Others (homeopathy, ir
idology, aromatherapy, crystal heali
ng, flower essences)




COURSE COMPETENCIES
:
At Mercy College, we want to ensure that
the student

will be
able to effectively compete for jobs and careers in an increasingly complex world. Therefore, the
College has focused on six foundational skills that we feel will help
student
s

achieve greater
success in college as well as in
their

career.
The student

will be expected to meet minimum
levels of achievement for graduation in these six competencies:


Writ
ten Communication

Oral Communication

Critical Thinking

Critical Reading

Quantitative Reasoning

Information Literacy


Written Communication
:

S
tudents
’ writing skills will be measured by their ability to

articulate
their understanding in writing
on exams, in project presentations, and in online discussions.


Oral Communication
:

S
tudent
s’

oral communication skills
will be
measured by the quality of
their

engage
ment

in class discussion and
collaborative group
work
,

especially during lab
activities
. Students will be expected to
orally
articulate their reasoning for
their predictions and
interpretations of data.


Critical Thinkin
g: Students
’ critical thinking skills

will be
measured by the process

of inquiry
encouraged by the active classroom activities
,
and

by their self
-
directed projects
.


Critical Reading
: Student
s’ critical reading skills
will be
measured by their ability

to critically
review and evaluate online resources of information

and o
ther students’ written work.


Quantitative Reasoning
:
Quantitative reasoning is
a pervasive part of this course. Students will
have to use mathematical models of functional relationships of measurable quantities, analyze
data quantitatively, and

be able to interpret visual displays of quantitative data.


Information Literacy:


St
udents
will be researching
physics
topics
of their own choosing.



REQUIRED TEXT:

Knight, Jones & Field

(2010)
College Physics
2
nd

Edition

Addison
-
Wesley


with

accompanying
Student Workbook, vols. 1 & 2, and code to register for Mastering Physics
(online homework and tutoring system).


Required:

Calculator (scientific
-

trigonometric functions, exponentials, logs, etc.)



COURSE ACTIVITIES

This course is taught i
n a “workshop” style where traditional lecture, lab, and recitation type
activities are integrated. Every class will include a variety of components.




Students will be guided to consider what gaps may exist in their present understanding of
the natural phenomena
under consideration.





Students will
work collaboratively in groups within a process of guided inquiry. Student
groups will share their predi
ctions and thinking with other groups by using group
whiteboards.




Students will experience hands
-
on exploration of natural phenomena
, often using their
own bodies for kinesthetic and other sensory input.




Students will

collect data
using c
omputer
interfaced sensors
, and then interpret and
analyze the tabular and graphical data output.





Students will use video for computer
ized
motion analysis.




E
ducation
al

interactive simulations, both in class and
for
online

homework
, will be used
to explore conc
epts concerning those aspects of topics that are not visibly apparent.




Students will work collaboratively in groups to practice applying newly learned physics
concepts

to superficially different
or increasingly complex
scenarios. Group work is
done on gr
oup whiteboards.
Exten
sions of those scenarios

may be given
for individual
practice at home.




Further i
ndividual

practice

applying physics concepts will be available using the
workbooks that accompany the text and the online Mastering Physics online tutorial and
homework system that includes the end of chapter questions from the text.




The text will provide additional per
spectives and will reinforce and supplement the
material covered in the class activities.




Frequent short quizzes, either online or in class, will give feedback to students about their
progress.




The
students will be self directed with a project
, of which
the

topic

will be
of their
choosing, within the guidelines of their instructor. T
hey will post
their project
online for
commentary and discussion by other students.


OUTCOME ASSESSMENT


Exams:
50
%


Example:


30% 4 topic exams


the lowest exam score may be dropped




20
% Cumulative Final Exam




Project
s/Papers
: 2
0
%

Example:

15%
Submitted in stages
online


5%
Discussion and comments on each others’ projects
online



Homework:
15
%

Example:
10%


M
astering Physics
online


5%
Workbook, Interactive Website comments, and Homework related to class
activities


Class Activities: 1
5
%

Example:

5%
Attendance and Effort 5%


5%
Quality of participation 5%


5%
Quizzes based on previous cla
ss activities


Assessment
category percentages may vary slightly with instructor.



COURSE POLICIES

1.

Attendance Policy


It is assumed that a student will attend all classes for which he/she is
registered. Ceasing to attend classes for three consecutive
class meetings without contacting
the instructor will result in the issuance of a grade of “FW” which indicates “stopped
attending.” This grade of “FW” will be calculated into the student’s GPA as an “F” and may
result in dismissal. In addition this stat
us will be reported to The Office of Student Services
and may result in a reduction of financial aid monies.

Because this course is participatory in nature and has integrated lab
and group
activities,
attendance is necessary to do well in the course.
Expect lack of attendance or frequent
lateness to be reflected in the course grade.


2.
Cheating and Plagiarism


Cheating and plagiarism are contrary to the purpose of any
educational institution and must be dealt with most severely if students’ work is
to have any
validity. An instructor who determines that a student has cheated on a test or assignment will
at a minimum give a zero for that item and may give a failure for the course. Normally the
matter is handled between the instructor and the student
, but either party to ensure fairness
may consult the department chairperson.

Suspicion of cheating on exams (e.g. as when two
students sitting next to each other have unnaturally similar answers) will result in another
exam
taken

in place of the origin
al
by

all parties involved.



Plagiarism, which is the appropriation of words or ideas of another without recognition of the
source, is another form of cheating. An instructor who determines that a student has
plagiarized will give a zero for the paper o
r project and may give a failure for the course.


Both cheating and plagiarism are grounds for dismissal from the College.


Any action taken regarding cheating or plagiarism is subject to the Academic Grievance
Policy outlined above and in the Student Hand
book.


3.
Cell Phone Use


Cell phones should be turned off prior to the start of class. Students that do
not abide by this policy may be asked to leave for the day and will receive an unexcused
absence.



Resources

Science Learning Center
-

in Dobbs
Ferry Learning Center


Free Physics Tutoring
-

Hours to be announced


For Tutoring needs, email:
tutoring@mercy.edu


BIBLIOGRAPHY


Tuszynski ( 2001)
.

Biomedical Applications of Physics,
Wiley


Newman, Jay (2008).
Physics of the Life Sciences
, Springer


Hewitt
, Paul

(2002)
.

Touch This! Conceptual Physics for Everyone
, Addison
-
Wesley


Hewitt
, Paul

(2010)
.


Practicing Physics, Conceptual Physics,

Addison
-
Wesley


Hewitt
, Paul

(2010)
.

Conceptual Physics

1
1
th edition
,
Addison
-
Wesley


Cameron
, Skofronick, Grant

(1999)
.

Physics of the Body
,
Medical Physics Publishing


Urone, Peter

(2001)
.


College Physics 2
nd

Edition
,

Brooks Cole


Urone, Peter (1986).
Physics with Health Science
Applications
, Wiley


Wisneski, L. (2009).
The Scientific Basis of Integrative Medicine
, CRC Press