Safety Thoughts (April 2011) - Angel Flight Northeast

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14 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 11 μήνες)

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Safety Thoughts



I was just reading the March 2011 issue of
Aviation Safety

Magazine
,

which always has good subjects
and thought provoking ideas.

Their website has some interesting safety ideas.


In the March issue, t
here is an article titled “Ducking Under”, which is
discusses

“B
usting minimums to
find the runway in the murk

.


Minimums are there to save your life. Why bust them? I have always said that if you
make a mistake,
err on the side o
f caution.


Many

general aviation pilots simply do not believe that you are playing a real game of “You Bet Your
Life”, especially on absolute
solid IFR
weather minimum approaches.

You need an out ! Ample fuel and a good alternate will get you back home f
or supper,
even though

you
might be a bit late. Think ahead.


What am I going to do if I don’t have the runway environment in sight at minimums? Have you ever
practiced a go
-
around? How do I get to the holding pattern and what is the correct entry?

A
m I going to
try another approach? How long can I hang around here before declaring my intent to go to my
alternate? Fuel on boa
rd is the primary consideration and the required ingredient for seeing loved ones
again.

Having a co
-
pilot in solid IFR is al
so a very good idea.


A couple of i
nstrument
f
acts:


When hand flying a low ceiling and low visibility approach most pilots who are not able to keep the
needles crossed, end up downwind and below the glide path.


Dark rainy nights tend to cause pilots to e
nd up below the glide path.



What kind of terrain is off the approach end of your approach runway?


Instrument
T
raining:


Some major airlines
are approved for

a 50 foot decision height with no visibility rest
rictions

on solid
instrument landings.
The ap
proach requires that both pilots have

to
are

trained
by hours of
full motion
simulator
time
, all instrument gages on both sides
have

to be operating, 2 autopilots
have

to be hooked
up and working together, auto throttles with automatic speed control,
and
2 radar altimeters

to determine
the height.

One pilot flys

the

approach and the other looks

out the
window. The pilot flying calls out

“Decision Height”.

The pilot looking o
ut (who is the landing pilot) can

only respond, “I’ve got it or go
around”.



T
he point of all this is that whenever flying instruments, plan ahead and use good judgment. A little
training goes a long way. “Practice the hard parts”.


Roger D’Entremont

AFNE Pilot Administration

Captain TWA retired
\

roger@angelflightne.org