Science Course Rubric

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1


CPCI Certification

SCIENCE

Course Rubric

School:


Course:


Evaluator:


Working Definition:

A “college
-
ready” course consists of intellectually rigorous coursework that covers sufficient

content knowledge and requires students to demonstrate the higher
-
order thinking skills that will
enable them to engage independently in non
-
remedial college level work.





2


Thank you for helping the DOE to evaluate high school courses for CPCI certificati
on.


The CPCI certification process is designed to recognize high school courses that are preparing students for college and to re
ward schools with credit

on the college readiness metric of the Progress Report for all students who pass one these courses.

In order to earn CPCI certification, a course
must pass both a quantitative and a qualitative evaluation.


This packet is designed to help you make a qualitative determination of the college
-
readiness of a course.
The qualitative evaluation focuses on
two main areas:
Content & Skills

and
Academic Rigor
.


What you should have

In addition to this evaluation packet, you should also have received a complete application for the course you are evaluating
. That

applicatio
n
should include the following:

1.

A syllabus, curriculum map, scope and sequence, or equivalent document

2.

A list of all key texts that are used in the course

3.

Copies of all major assignments that students are expected to complete (including rubrics, scoring gu
ides, etc.)

4.

Copies of graded student work for
three major

assignments

5.

An explanation of the grading policy

6.

An explanation of any prerequisite requirements for student to enroll in the course

7.

Written responses to eight short answer questions (2 from Part I
of the application and 6 from Part II)


If you are missing any of the above materials, please contact

Janna Robin.


What is included in the application review packet

1.

T
wo worksheets
,

one
for each category



t
hese worksheets are intended to help you focus o
n aspects of the application that pertain to the
categories covered in the rubric.


2.

A
rubric

with 2 categories.

3.

A
matrix

that demonstrates how the rubric determinations will be used in the overall determination.

4.

A
reviewer recommendation

section where you will provide a recommendation based on your overall impression of the course.

5.

An
application feedback form

where you will provide concrete strengths and areas for growth/areas of concern that will be shared with the
school.




3



Recommen
ded use of
the packet

1.

Read the application

2.

Fill out the Rubric.

a.

The category worksheets are included to assist in your rubric determination. While they are not officially “counted” as part

of the
evaluation, we ask that you complete them as part of
your review process.

3.

Complete the Reviewer Recommendation.

a.

Based on your review of the entire application, w
ould you recommend that this cours
e be certified as college
-
ready? Why or why
not?

4.

Complete the Application Feedback form.

a.

What are some strengths

of the course that emerge from the application?

b.

What are some areas for growth (for course to be certified) or areas of concern (courses the do not meet certification criter
ia) that
emerge from the application?




4



CONTENT &
SKILLS



Worksheet
(Science)

Very
Often

Often

Somewhat
Often

Infrequent

or Never

Based on the evidence provided, are students prepared for the content knowledge expectations of students who
enroll in a non
-
remedial college
Science
course?



Students understand and can appl y the sci enti fi c method

accuratel y

desi gni ng and conducti ng sci ent
i fi c
i nvesti gati ons duri ng whi ch they formul ate and test hypotheses




Students conduct sci enti fi c l abs.



Students use mathemati cal ski l ls/concepts to sol ve sci enti fi c problems (e.g. al gebrai c formul as, basic
tri gonometri c pri nci ples, basic statistics and pro
babi lity).



Students probl em sol ve usi ng vari ous strategi es and approaches.






Based on the evidence provide, are students prepared for the content knowledge expectations of students who
enroll in a non
-
remedial college

Science

course in the spe
cific
subject (e.g. Chemistry, Physics, etc.
)?



Students understand the KEY concepts or bi g i deas of the subject.



(See attached subject
-
speci fi c concept l i sts (i f available) to hel p you gui de your determi nati on.)






Based on the evidence provided, are
students asked to and prepared to demonstrate the Literacy and Writing
skills articulated in the 11
-
12 grade expectations of the NYC
-
CCLS standards
?



Students anal yze
the author’s purpose i n provi di ng an expl anati on, descri bing a procedure, or
di scussing an

experi ment i n a text, and i
denti fy i mportant i ssues that are l eft unresol ved.



Students determi ne the central i deas or concl usions of a text and accuratel y summari ze compl ex
concepts, processes or i nformati on
.



Students eval uate the hypothesi s, data, anal ysi s, and concl usions i n a sci ence or techni cal text,
veri fyi ng data when possi bl e and corroborati ng or chal lengi ng conclusions wi th other sources of
i nformati on.



Students
i
ntegrate and eval uate mul ti pl e source
s of i nformati on presented i n di verse formats and
medi a (e.g., quanti tati ve data, vi deo, mul ti medi a) i n order to address a questi on or sol ve a probl em.



Students construct wri tten arguments on substanti ve topi cs that i ntroduce preci se cl ai ms and use
val i d
reasoni ng and ci te speci fi c textual evi dence
/data

from pri mary and secondary sources to
support the cl ai ms.



Students produce cl ear and coherent wri ti ng appropri ate to task, purpose, and audi ence usi ng a
formal styl e and objecti ve tone whi l e attendi ng to t
he norms and conventi ons of wri ti ng for the
di sci pline.



Students wri te routi nel y over extended ti me frames (ti me for research, refl ecti on, and revi si on) and
shorter ti me frames (a si ngl e si tti ng or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audi ence
s.



Students devel op and s trengthen wri ti ng through the wri ti ng proces s.



Students us e technol ogy to produce and publ i s h wri ti ng and to i nteract wi th others.






5




Students use academi c l anguage i n thei r wri ti ng.



Students determine the central ideas or conclusion
s of a text and accurately summarize
complex concepts, processes or information in a text.


Are students in the course exposed to the experimental design skills expected of students who enroll in an
introductory Science course in college?



Students
demonstrate the abi l i ty to create a hypothesi s.



Students demonstrate the abi l i ty to i denti fy and use standard l ab equi pment.



Students demonstrate the abi l i ty to take compl ete a l ab report.



Students demonstrate a strong knowl edge of measurement.



Students
demonstrate a worki ng knowl edge of safety procedures i n a l ab setti ng.





Are students in the course exposed to academic behaviors comprised of work habits, organizational,
communication, and problem
-
solving skills to help prepare them for success in col
lege and careers?





In the course of thei r cl assroom experi ences

students work in cooperative groups.



In the course of thei r cl assroom experi ences

students are expected to be organized and have
methodical approaches to group and individual tasks



In the
course of thei r cl assroom experi ences

students experience a range of short and long term
assignments.



In the course of thei r cl assroom experi ences

students have to self
-
monitor their own work and
progress.



In the course of thei r cl assroom experi ences

stude
nts have means by which to take advantage of
additional support?










6


CONTENT DEMAND


Science

ALL Science
Courses

Content Demand


Yes

No


Students demonstrate an
accurate
understandi ng of the sci enti fi c method through assi gnments that ask them to
desi gn and conduct
sci enti fi c i nvestigati ons duri ng whi ch they formul ate and test hypotheses.




Students are routi nel y engaged i n l aboratory
and hands
-
on
acti vi ties.




Students regul arl y use mathemati cal ski l ls/concepts i n thei r sci ence cl ass (e.g. use

of al gebrai c formul as; basi c tri gonometri c
pri nci pl es such as sine, cosi ne, and tangent; basi c stati stics and probabi lity).




Students demonstrate a sol i d understanding and appl i cation of measurement i ncl udi ng how to sel ect and use appropri ate terms a
nd
how to esti mate/approxi mate.




Students are regul arl y expected to probl em
-
sol ve usi ng vari ous strategi es and approached.




Environmental
Science

Content Demand

Yes

No


The rel ati onshi p of the earth’s vari ous systems and of the earth and the sun




Geol ogy



The hi story
and structure
of the earth



The hi story of the sol ar system



The process of vol cani sm and erosi on




The
i nteracti on of the envi ronment and bi ota (i ncl udi ng humans) and the consequences of that i nteracti on.




Chemistry

Content Demand

Yes

No


The nature of the physi cal and chemi cal properti es of matter (atoms, mol ecul es, i ons, etc.)



The states of matter



Aci d and base chemi stry




The pri nci pl es of atomi c structure and bondi ng



El ectrons, protons, and neutrons



Composi ti on of mol ecul es


made up of atoms i n a uni que and consi stent arrangement



The rel ati onshi p between el ectroni c confi gurati on of atoms and t
he chemi cal properti es of an el ement




The pri nci pl es that expl ai n chemi cal reacti ons



Substances react wi th other substances to form new substances (compounds) wi th di fferent characteri sti cs and properti es



Stoi chi ometry





7




Living
Environment

Content
Demand

Yes

No


The general structure and functi on of cel l s



The parts of the cel l



The range and vari ati on of cel l s (di fferent types of cel l s, cel l s perform di fferent functi ons for an organi sm, di fferent type
s of
organi sms have cel l s speci alized for di fferent functi ons)



The i mportance of water and carbon to cel l s



The process of cel l di v
i si on (mi tosis and mei osi s) and the producti on of new cel l s and the passi ng on of geneti c i nformati on



The rol e of DNA i n eukaryoti c cel l s



The rol e of cel l s i n transformi ng energy from one form to another (photosynthesi s and respi rati on), the producti on of
ATP, and
the chemi cal reacti ons i nvol ved i n cel l functi on



The transporti ng/exchange of materi al s across a membrane




The geneti c pri nci ples that gui de the i nheri tance of bi ol ogi cal trai ts



Mendel ’s l aws of heredi ty



The chemi cal and structural properti es o
f DNA




The organi zati on and cl assificati on of l i ving systems



Mul ti cel l ular organisms have a vari ety of speci al ized cel l s, ti ssues, organs, and systems that perform speci al ized functi ons



Ways i n whi ch l i vi ng thi ngs can be cl assified based on thei r
i nternal and external structure, thei r devel opment, and thei r DNA
sequence




Evol uti on



Concept of natural sel ecti on



The theory of evol uti on



How DNA and protei n sequences are used to i nfer evol uti onary rel ati onships







8



Physics

Content Demand

Yes

No


The concept of energy



The rel ati onshi p between heat and temperature



The Fi rst Law of Thermodynami cs and the conservati on of energy



The Second Law of thermodynami cs and entropy



The di sti ncti on between ki neti c and potenti al energy



Transfer of energy



Opti cs



El ectri ci ty and magneti sm



Seri es and paral lel ci rcuits




Moti on and the pri nci ples that expl ai n i t



Newton’s Laws



Characteri sti cs and properti es of sounds and el ectromagneti c waves



Range of the el ectromagneti c spectrum




The ki nds of force that exi sts
between obj ects



Gravi tati onal force



El ectri cal force



El ectromagneti c force




Concepts rel ated to modern physi cs



Theory of speci al rel ativity



Speed of l i ght




Matter and i ts properti es



Mass



Densi ty




Basi c Laws



Conservati on l aws of energy



Laws
governi ng el ectri cal and magneti c forces



Rel ati onshi p between el ectri cal currents and magneti c fi el ds






9



ACADEMIC
RIGOR



Worksheet

(Science)

Very
Often

Often

Somewhat
Often

Infrequent
or Never

Based on the evidence provided, is the course material that students are expected to master sufficiently rigorous
and intellectually challenging?





In order to pass the course, are students expected to complete tasks that demonstrate mastery independen
tly as
opposed to with significant assistance from the teacher or peers?





Based on the evidence provided, are students asked to complete task
,


that ask them to use strategic thinking and
reasoning (
DOK
Level 3) and/or extended thinking

(DOK
Level 4)?



Course work requi res students to use reasoni ng and to devel op a pl an to approach a probl em
.



Course work requi res deci si on maki ng and justi fi cation
.



Course work requi res students to go beyond the text and expl ai n, general i ze, or connect i deas
.

Course
work r
equi res students to read suffi ci entl y compl ex texts based on the expectati ons of the CCLS.



Course work requi res students to devel op a l ogi cal argument and ci te evi dence
.



Course work i nvol ves an i nvesti gati on or
accurate
appl icati on

of sci enti fic concepts

to real worl d
probl ems
.



Course work requi res students to anal yze or synthesi ze i nformati on for mul ti pl e sources
.



Course work requi res ti me to research, probl em sol ve, and process mul ti pl e condi ti ons of the probl em
or task.



Course work requi res students to

record, anal yze, and represent data i n mul ti pl e ways.






Based on the evidence provided, are students asked to complete task
s

that require them to think at the higher
domains of Bloom’s Taxonomy
,



Anal yze

(i e. Compare, Contrast, Debate, Research)



Eval uate

(i e. Argue, Assess, Cri ti que)



Synthesi ze (
i e
Create, Perform, Desi gn)











10


Science
Course Rubric

Category I:
CONTENT &
SKILLS



Is the material taught in this class the material that students are expected to know before enrolling in an introductory leve
l
Science
course?



Are students who pass this course prepared with the skills they will need to succeed in an intr
oductory level Science
course?



In order to pass the course are students expected to complete work to a level such that they demonstrate mastery of the conte
nt and skills and can apply
what they learn to new and novel situations without the support of the t
eacher?


Considering the determinations you made using the Content & Skills Worksheet criteria, how would you rate the CONTENT & SKILL
S of this
course?

College
-
Ready





Students who pass the cl ass wi l l be fami l i ar wi th the most, i f not al l, of the
sci enti fi c concepts and
content knowl edge they are expected to
know i n an i ntroductory col l ege course.



The ski l l s embedded i n thi s course are cl earl y and undoubtedl y suffi ci ent to prepare students for an i ntroductory col l ege cou
rse.

Likely College
-

Ready



Students are exposed to most of the
sci enti fi c concepts and
content knowl edge they are expected to know i n an i ntroductory col l ege course.



The ski l l s embedded i n thi s course are l i kel y to be suffi ci ent to prepare students for an i ntroductory col l ege cours
e.

Potentially
College
-

Ready




Students are exposed to some of the
scientific concepts and
content knowledge they are expected to know in an introductory college course.



The skills embedded in this course may be sufficient to prepare students for an intr
oductory college course.

Unlikely to be
College Ready



The course does not cover enough of the

scientific concepts and

content knowledge expected to prepare students for introductory level
course.



The skills embedded in this course are unlikely to be
sufficient to prepare students for an introductory college course.


Category II:
ACADEMIC RIGOR



Is the material taught in this class sufficiently rigorous to consider this course College
-
Ready?



Are student expected to complete tasks that are intellectual
ly rigorous?


Considering the determinations you made using the Academic Rigor Worksheet criteria, how would you rate the ACADEMIC RIGOR of

this
course?

College
-
Ready





A
cademic tasks require

students
to engage deeply with and accurately apply scientific

concepts on a regular basis.



Students are regularly asked to complete demanding work requiring higher
-
order thinking that will prepare them for an introductory college
course.

Likely College
-

Ready



A
cademic tasks are

challenging and students are required

to
engage deeply with and accurately apply scientific concepts on a regular

basis.



Some of the work that students are asked to complete requires higher
-
order thinking that will prepare them for an introductory college
course.

Potentially
College
-

Ready




Academic

tasks are

challenging but students interact with the material inconsistently OR course content is inconsistently challenging.



Very little of work that students are asked to complete requires higher
-
order thinking that will prepare them for an int
roductory college
course.

Unlikely to be
College Ready



A
cademic tasks are

either not challenging enough OR students are not required to engage with material at anything but a cursory level.



Almost none of the work that students are asked to complete req
uires higher
-
order thinking that will prepare them for an introductory
college course.


11


OVERALL DETERMINATION

In order to

Pass


the Qualitative Evaluation, a course must be eligible for either a 1 or 2 year certification according to the Rubric Determin
ation
AND

receive a “Yes” designation from the Reviewer Reaction.

Rubric

Determination



ACADEMIC RIGOR



College
-
Ready

Likely College
-
Ready

Potentially
College
-
Ready

Unlikely to be
College
-
Ready

CONTENT &
SKILLS

College
-
Ready

2 Year
Certification

2 Year
Certification

Does not meet

Does not meet

Likely College
-
Ready

2 Year
Certification

1 Y
ear
Certification

Does not meet

Does not meet

Potentially College
-
Ready

Does not meet

Does not meet


Does not meet

Does not meet

Unlikely to be
College
-
Ready

Does not meet

Does not meet


Does not meet

Does not meet


Reviewer
Recommendation




Is the work (both the content and the types of tasks) that students are expected to complete at least as challenging as the w
ork in other CPCI courses?



Based on your holistic review of the course and considering the entirety of the application, do you
recommend

that this course
receive certification
as a

“college
-
ready” course?
Indicate Yes or No and then provide a short rationale

for your recommendation
.

Yes






No







12


Application Feedback

Strengths

Please describe 3


5 strengths that emerge from the application.

Ex.
A majority of tasks are at a Depth of Knowledge level 3 and require students to demonstrate higher
-
order thinking. All unit tests
include open
-
ended responses. For example, one test asks students to explain why certain biological functions exist and how
those
principals relate to other biological functions for the same organism.


1.


2.


3.


Areas for
Development

Please describe 3


5 areas of concern that emerge from the application.

Ex.
Many of the questions in the assessments provided as part of the applic
ation focus on recall and other non
-
higher order thinking
skills.
Furthermore,
the expectations for student work did not appear rigorous enough to qualify this course as a college ready course.
For example, students were able to pass the final exam with a


B


having written less than 1 page.

1.


2.


3.