COURSE OUTLINE FORM

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Metropolitan
Community College


COURSE OUTLINE FORM

(Page
1

of
7
)




ESO Revised 3
-
13
-
01




Course Title:

General
Physics I


Course Prefix & No.:


PHYS 2
10
C

LEC:
2.0

LAB:






1.5

Credit Hours:






2.
5




COURSE DESCRIPTION:

General Physics I is the first course of a calculus
-
based
college
physics

sequence
. Th
e

course
is

taught as three
courses
(PHYS 210A, PHYS 210B, and PHYS 210C) that
include lecture and lab. All
three
courses must be
successfully completed

to transfer as a semester length course. Topics include: heat, thermodynamics and

kinetic energy.


COURSE PREREQUISITE
:

College
-
level reading, writing, and math proficiency and PHYS 210B



RATIONALE:

This course is intended for academic transfer students intending to pursue a professio
nal career (physics,
chemistry
, engineering, etc.).

Students who are more comfortable in smaller classes but need a thorough
knowledge of

physics may

benefit from this course.


REQUIRED TEXTBOOK (S) and/or MATERIALS:


Title:

University Physics




Edition:

2012/13








Author:

Young & Freedman

Publisher:

Pearson












Materials:

Scientific Calculator



Attached course outline written by:
W. T. Waggoner



Date:
1/31/01

_

Reviewed/Revised by:

Kendra Sibbernsen








Date:
1/25/07

_

Effective quarter of course outline:

11
/FA








Academic Dean
:








Date:







_______________


Course Objectives, Topical Unit Outlines, and Unit Objectives must be attached to this form.
Metropolitan
Community College


COURSE OUTLINE FORM

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2

of
7
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ESO Revised 3
-
13
-
01




TITLE:
General
Physics

I


PREFIX/NO:
PHYS 2
1
0C


COURSE OBJECTIVES:


To help the student learn the skills necessary to:


1.

demonstrate an understanding of stress, strain, Young’s Modulus and Bulk Modulus
;

2.

apply the concepts of pressure, density and pressure depth to physical situations
;

3.

understand and solve problems relating to buoyancy and Archimedes’ Principle;

4.

derive Bernou
lli’s, Torricelli’s and Poiseulle’s Relationships;

5.

demonstrate an understanding of the conditions for

heat, temperature and thermal expansion
;

6.

de
monstrate an understandi
ng of

the Ideal gas laws and kinetic theory;

7.

understand and solve

problems related to V
an der Waa
ls equation and

Maxwell’s equation
;

8.

demonstrate the ability to solve calorimetry problems

9.

state and apply the Laws of Thermodynamics
;

10.

demonstrate the ability to perform lab experiments safely

using both direct and computer based
methodology
, to
a
nalyze and
interpret the data collected and to draw reasonable conclusions based on
the data.






TOPICAL UNIT OUTLINE/UNIT OBJECTIVES:


I.

Statics and strength


At the conclusion of the study of this topic, the student should be able to:


a.

state and apply

the conditions for static equilibrium to rigid bodies;

b.

locate the center of gravity of a system of particles or a rigid body, this includes objects with variable
density, 2
-
D lamina, and simple 3
-
D shapes;

c.

make use of the conditions for static equilibrium

and the method involving free
-
body diagrams to set up
equations relating to the quantities of force, torque, mass, moment of inertia, linear and angular
acceleration;

d.

define the terms: elasticity, stress, strain and modulus;

e.

characterize the three elastic

moduli, Young’s, shear, and bulk and the conditions under which each is
applicable;

f.

Define the terms elastic limit and yield point.





Metropolitan
Community College


COURSE OUTLINE FORM

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3

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ESO Revised 3
-
13
-
01


II
.

Fluids


At the conclusion of the study of this topic, the student should be able to:


a.

identify the four states of
matter and characterize the important and distinctive features of each from
both a macroscopic and molecular view;

b.

define the term pressure and the commonly used units associated with this quantity;

c.

relate in a formula the pressure in a fluid to its mass d
ensity, the depth at which observation is taken
and the atmospheric pressure;

d.

state Archimedes’ Principle and apply it to the solution of problems related to the buoyant forces acting
on objects immersed in or floating on a fluid;

e.

identify the conditions w
hich define the behavior of an ideal fluid;

f.

express the equation of continuity and apply it to the solution of problems that relate fluid flow rates
through pipes of varying cross section;

g.

using the law of energy conservation as a starting point, derive Be
rnoulli’s equation for fluid flow and
apply it to the solution of problems which relate quantities of flow velocity, pressure and pipe
elevation;

h.

apply the Bernoulli equati
on to explain natural phenomena;

i.

define viscosity as a measure of resistance to
fluid flow;

j.

express Poiseulle’s Law and interpret its parameters;

k.

discuss the nature of surfa
ce tension and capillary action.



III.
Kinetic Theory


At the conclusion of the study of this topic, the student should be able to:


a.

d
efine
and explain
the
assumptions made in describing the properties of individual molecules which
make up an ideal gas.

b.

using the above assumptions, derive the equation which relates the pressure and/or temperature of a
confined ideal gas to the molecular kinetic energy of the
molecules;

c.

using the empirical equation of state for an ideal gas, derive the equation which relates the temperature
of an ideal gas to the average molecular kinetic energy;

d.

state the
equipartition of energy theorem, and the equation for the total internal

energy of an ideal
monatomic gas;

e.

define the quantities, molar heat capacity at constant pressure, molar heat capacity at a constant volume
and gamma (ratio of molar heat capacities);

f.

state the definition of an adiabatic process and the relationship betwe
en pressure and volume of an
adiabatic process involving an ideal gas;

g.

explain the variations of heat capacities of real gases in terms of the degrees of freedom of the gas using
the equipartion of energy theorem;

h.

describe Maxwell’s equation and the manner

in which it is influenced by temperature and calculate the
most probably speed, the rms speed and the average speed;

i.

define the term, mean free path, and describe how it is influenced by molecular size and density;

j.

explain how Van der Waals equation is di
fferent from the ideal gas law;

k.

define the difference

between diffusion and effusion.

Metropolitan
Community College


COURSE OUTLINE FORM

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ESO Revised 3
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IV.


Calorimetry


At the conclusion of the study of this topic, the student should be able to:


a.

cite the conditions and processes under which energy transfer takes
place from one body to another by
means of heat flow;

b.

define the traditional units for heat and temperature;

c.

define the mechanical equivalent of heat;

d.

apply the equation of calorimetry to solve problems;

e.

define and apply the equation for latent heat;

f.

express the work done on or by a gas as an integral of its pressure and volume and equate the work
done to the area under the curve of a pressure vs. volume plot;


g.

describe the three processes of heat flow in qualitative terms;

h.

derive the equation of heat
transfer by conduction and use it solve problems;

i.

derive the equation of heat transfer by radiation and use it to solve problems.


V.
Laws of Thermodynamics


At the conclusion of the study of this topic, the student should be able to:


a.

state the
first law of thermodynamics and use it to solve problems;

b.

define the following thermodynamic processes: quasi
-
static, adiabatic, isothermal, isobaric and
isometric (or isovolumetric).

c.

define a heat engine and determine the efficiency of heat engines;

d.

stat
e the second law of thermodynamics;

e.

discuss and calculate entropy.


VI.


Laboratory component


At the conclusion of the course, students should have an understanding of the applications of the above topics as
reinforced in the laboratory components
described below.



Week 1:


Archimedes’ Principle


Week 2:


Ideal Gas Laws (Boyle’s, Charles and Gay Lussac)


Week 3:


Thermal Expansion


Week 4:


Specific Heat


Week 5:


Heat of Fusion

and Vaporization



Metropolitan
Community College


COURSE OUTLINE FORM

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ESO Revised 3
-
13
-
01


COURSE REQUIREMENTS/EVALUATION:






COURSE
OBJECTIVES/ASSESSMENT MEASURES



COURSE OBJECTIVES


ASSESSMENT MEASURES

1. demonstrate an understanding of stress, strain,
Y
oung’s Modulus and Bulk Modulus.



1.
classroom t
esting, homework assignments and lab

reports will
be used to assess student knowledge and
understanding of
stress, strain, Y
oung’s Modulus and
Bulk Modulus.


A minimum average score of 6
0% is required

for each
type of assignment.







2.


apply the concepts of pressure, density and
pressure depth to physical situations
.


2.
classroom t
esting, homework assignments and
lab reports will
be used to assess student knowledge
and understanding o
f
pressure, density and pressure
depth to
physical situations
.


A minimum average score of 6
0% is required

for each
type of assignment
.


3.

understand and solve problems relating to
buoyancy and Archimedes’ Principle
.

3.
classroom t
esting, homework assignments and
lab reports will
be used to assess student knowledge
and understanding of
buoyancy and Archimedes’
Principle
.


A minimum average score of 6
0% is required

for each
type of assignment.


4.

derive Bernoulli’s, Torricelli’s and Poiseulle’s
Relationships
.

4.
classroom t
esting, homework assignments and
lab reports will
be used to assess studen
t knowledge
and understanding

Bernoulli’s, Torricelli’
s and
Poiseulle’s Relationships.


A minimum average score of 6
0% is required

for each
type of assignment.







Metropolitan
Community College


COURSE OUTLINE FORM

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ESO Revised 3
-
13
-
01



5.
demonstrate an
understanding of
demonstrate
an understanding of the conditions for

heat,
temperature and thermal expansion
.

5.
classroom t
esting, homework assignments and lab
reports will
be used to assess student kno
wledge and
understanding of
the conditions for

heat, temperature
and thermal expansion
.

A minimum average score of 6
0% is required

for each
type of assignment.







6.

de
monstrate an understanding of the Id
eal gas
laws and kinetic theory.


6.
classroom t
esting, homework assignments and lab
reports will
be used to assess student knowledge and
understanding of
the Id
eal gas laws and kinetic theory.


A minimum average score of 6
0% is required

for each
type of assignment.

7.



understand and solve problems related to
Van der Waals equation and Maxwell’s
equation.


7. classroom t
esting, homework assignments and lab
reports will
be used to assess student knowledge and
understanding
of Van der Waals equation and
Maxwell’s equation.


A minimum average score of 6
0% is required

for each
type of assignment.








8.
demonstrate the abilit
y to solve calorimetry
problems.


8.
classroom t
esting, homework assignments and
lab reports will
be used to assess student knowledge
and understanding of
calorimetry problems.


A minimum average score of 6
0% is required

for each
type of assignment.


9. state and apply the Laws of Thermodynamics
.

9. classroom t
esting, homework assignments and
lab reports will
be used to assess student knowledge
and understanding of
Laws of Thermodynamics.


A minimum average score of 6
0% is required

for each
type of assignment.

Metropolitan
Community College


COURSE OUTLINE FORM

(Page
7

of
7
)




ESO Revised 3
-
13
-
01


10
.
demonstrate the ability to perform lab
exper
iments safely

using both direct and computer
based methodology
, to
analyze and
interpret the data
collected and to draw reasonable conclusions based
on the data.


10
.
laboratory reports are required for each
laboratory exercise. These reports will asse
ss the
ability of the student to follow directions, collect data
and draw reasonable conclusions from the data
collected.


A minimum average score of 6
0% is required.