Research and Design Reports

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Research and
Design Reports

Common components:

1.
Transmittal
letter

2.
Front cover
and label

3.
Table of contents

4.
List of figures

5.
Executive summary

6.
Introduction

7.
Body of the report

8.
Conclusions

9.
Appendixes (including references
)

10.
Back cover

Cover Page

Include a date



Maglev Applications for

Space Launch Systems

Prepared

by

Maglev Systems Research, Inc.

Title Page

If the transmittal letter
is included as page 1,
the title page is page
2. Other the title page
is page 1.







Maglev Applications for

Space Launch Systems

Prepared

For

Dr. David
McMurrey
, CEO

Advanced Space Launch Systems, Inc.


by

Maglev Systems Research, Inc.

December 9, 2013













This report compares current space launch costs to those
of

Maglev
-
based systems, describes Gen
-
1 system plans,
reviews the costs of building the system facility,
dis
-
cusses the best locations for these facilities, and ends
with a review of the applications and the benefits of this
new technology.

Transmittal Letter

Attached to the front
cover or first page inside.






December 9, 2013


Dr. David
McMurrey
, CEO

Advanced Space Launch Systems, Inc.

2000 W. 38th Street

Austin, TX 78703

Dear Dr.
McMurrey
:











Sincerely yours,




Roberta
Swinney
, CEO

Maglev Systems Research, Inc.


End.: Maglev Applications for Space Launch Systems
(report)


Maglev Systems Research, Inc.

1307 Research Ridge Suite 301

Round Rock, TX 7856

I am submitting the attached report entitled
Maglev
Applications for Space Launch Systems.


This report compares current space launch costs to those of
Maglev
-
based systems, describes Gen
-
1 system plans, reviews
the costs of building the system facility, discusses the best
locations for these facilities, and ends with a review of the
applications and the benefits of this new technology.


I hope this report will help generate interest in this exciting new
technology!


Table of

Contents

List of Figures and Tables

Executive

Summary

Executive Summary


Rocket launch costs, currently at ~$10,000 per kg of
payload and $20 million for a single passenger, make
large
-
scale commercial use and human exploration of
the solar system unlikely.

Magnetic acceleration of levitated spacecraft to orbital
speeds, 8 km/sec or more, from evacuated tunnels on
the surface, would reduce the cost to reach orbital speed
to less than $1 per kilogram of payload. One of the two
Maglev launch systems, the Gen
-
1 System will by 2020
put an unmanned 40
-
ton, 2
-
meter
-
diameter spacecraft
with 35 tons of payload cargo craft into orbit by means of
a 100
-
kilometer long evacuated tunnel located in high
altitude terrain (~5000 meters). At 12 launches per day,
a single Gen
-
1 facility could launch 150,000 tons
annually.

Using present costs for tunneling, superconductors,
cryogenic equipment, materials, etc., the projected
construction cost for the Gen
-
1 facility is $20 billion.
Amortization cost, plus spacecraft and O&M costs, total
$43 per kg of payload.

For polar orbit launches, sites exist in Alaska, Russia,
and China. For equatorial orbit launches, sites exist in
the Andes and Africa.

The Gen
-
2 system would enable large
-
scale human
access. The Gen
-
2 system could launch hundreds of
thousands of passengers per year and be in operation
by 2030.

These two systems will enable large
-
scale human
exploration of space, thousands of
gigawatts

from space
solar power satellites beamed power to Earth, a robust
defense against asteroids and comets, and many other
applications not possible now.

Sample Page



1.0 Introduction


1.1 Purpose of This Report

This report is intended to make the general public aware of the
exciting work being done by Rather Creative Innovations Group,
in particular, James Powell, George
Maise
, and John Rather.
We hope that our efforts at Maglev Systems Research will lead
to greater public appreciation and support for the development
of this technology.

1.2 Background of This Report

Rocket launch costs, currently at ~$10,000 per kg of payload
and $20 million for a single passenger, make large
-
scale
commercial use and human exploration of the solar system
unlikely. Maglev
-
based launch systems provide one of the best
hopes for the further exploration of space and its productive use.

1.3 Scope of This Report

This report will



Compare current space launch costs to those of Maglev
-
based systems



Describe Gen
-
1 system plans



Review the costs of building the system facility



Discuss the best locations for these facilities



Review of the applications and the benefits of this new
technology.

This report briefly mentions the Gen
-
2 system which will be
designed to take cargo and humans into space but does not
cover this phase the project in depth.


Sample Page



2.2
StarTram

and Maglev


The first
StarTram

system, Gen
-
1, is a high G cargo launch
system. After reaching orbital speed, the vehicle leaves the
acceleration tunnel at a high altitude, but still at ground
level. The vehicle then coasts up to orbit, experiencing
strong but manageable aerodynamic heating and
deceleration forces. Because of the low energy cost per
kilogram, large amounts of protective coatings and coolants
for the cargo craft do not significantly increase launch cost.

















Figure 2.
StarTram

Emerging from Launch Tube

Full development of the Gen
-
1 will require extensive
research and trade studies in the following areas:


Blunt nose geometry, with an effective drag coefficient

of 0.09


Different launch altitudes (4000, 6000, and 8000

meters)


Different launch angles (10 or 15 degrees relative to

surface)


Three different approaches to compensate for the

velocity loss during ascent through the atmosphere

References

Page

7.0 References


[1] Powell, J.R. and Danby, G.T. “High Speed Transport by
Magnetically Suspended Trains”,

Paper 66
-
WA/RR
-
5. ASME
Meeting
, NY, NY. Also,
Mech Eng.
,
89
, p. 30
-
35 (1967).

[2] Powell, J., Maise, G., and Paniagua, J. “StarTram: A New
Concept for Very Low Cost Earth to Orbit Transport Using Ultra
High Velocity Magnetic Launch”, paper IAF
-
01
-
S.6.04,
52nd
International Astronautical Congress
, Toulouse, France, Oct. 1
-
5 (2001).

[3] Powell, J., Maise, G., and Paniagua, J. “StarTram: A Maglev
System for Ultra Low Cost Launch of Cargo to LEO, GEO, and
the Moon”,
Paper IAC
-
03
-
IAA.13.1.04, 54th International
Congress
, Bremen, Germany.

[4] Powell, J., Maise, G., and Paniagua, J. “StarTram: An Ultra
Low Cost Launch System to Enable Large Scale Exploration of
the Solar System”,
Space Technology and Applications
International Forum

(STAIF
-
2006), Albuquerque, NM, February
12
-
16 (2006).

[5] Powell, J., Maise, G., Paniagua, J., and Jordan, J.,
“StarTram


An International Facility to Magnetically Launch
Payloads at Ultra Low Unit Cost”; Paper IAC
-
06
-
D3.2.7;
57th
International Astronautical Congress
, Valencia, Spain, October
(2006).

[6] Carlson, H.W. “Simplified Sonic Boom Prediction”,
NASA
TP
-
1122
, March (1978).

[7] Ishmael, S.D. “What is the X
-
30?”, in
Proceedings of the
First flight 30th Anniversary Celebration
, NASA Hugh L. Dryden
Flight Test Research Facility, Edwards, California, January
(1991).

[8] Powell, J., Maise, G., Paniagua, J., and Rather, J.
“Magnetically Inflated Cable (MIC) System for Large
ScaleSpace Structures”,
NIAC Phase 1 Report
, May 1, 2006,
NIAC Subaward No. 07605
-
003
-
046. Also, “MIC


A Self
Deploying Magnetically Inflated Cable System”,
Acta
Astronautica
,
48
, No 5
-
12, p 331
-
352.( 2001).