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2 Φεβ 2013 (πριν από 4 χρόνια και 2 μήνες)

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Jessica Brown


August 23
rd



September 5
th


Name: ______________________________________________ Date: _________

Cover/Assignment Sheet #2: Reflective Journal

Description.

In this assignment you will select events that you feel are important to building
collaboration within a school, describe the
events, share why you think they matter,
and share your thoughts about them.


Instructions.

Select
at least one event each week for a reflection entry
. Each reflection entry
will consist of the following four parts:

1.

The date, the time of day, and a short
title for the event.

2.

A brief description of the event in narrative format. Then include a
description of why you think the event is important. In your description,
relate how the event describes (or does not describe)
E2 of the HOPE
Principles


Exemplif
y collaboration within the school.

3.

Then tie in the event to various theories of education that you have learned.
Make sure you quote from an article or textbook and cite the source you are
using. You must tie in the theory with the event and actively rela
te theory to
practice.


The following questions may help you get started, but don’t feel as if you need to
answer them; they are merely starter questions.




What current events are related to this event?



What kind of educational philosophy is this event

related to and how can you
tell?



What legal and/or policy questions does this event raise?



What cultural influences are operating in this event?



Does the event have any relation to special education and how do you know?



What implications for curricu
lum does this event have?



What kind of instructional technique is demonstrated?



What kind of decision process do you think the teacher used in this event?



What other kinds of teacher action might have been used?



Why did the teacher choose the
action they did?


While you may want to take hand
-
written notes during or near the “reflection
event,” your journal entries (two minimum) should be typed. Double
-
space your
entries. Make sure your name and the dates of your work days are on each page.


W
hat to Submit.

1.

Submit this page as a cover sheet.

2.

Your reflective journal with a minimum of two entries. Each entry must have
three citations that you get from your Foundations courses and textbooks.
Also provide references at the end of each entry.

Jessica Brown


August 23
rd



September 5
th





1.

Aug
ust 24
th



9:00am


All Faculty Meeting and ASB Speech
!

The meetings teachers attend before school starts are boring.
Important, yes, but boring. This was one of the first things that I learned
during my September

Experience
. When I told Mr. Bard that I
would be
attending the
se

meetings wit
h him, he expressed such sympathy
, I
immediately was suspicious of what I was getting myself into.

The following Tuesday,
I woke up at a ridiculous hour, went down to
the high school and sat in a freezing auditorium fo
r five hours. Many topics
were discussed during this meeting about kids learning, first day procedures
,
Professional Learning Communities

and other such things,
but two

main
thing
s

struck m
e

in particular. First, there
was a

speech given to the staff by
th
e ASB president. The young man nervously walked up to the front of the
auditorium and talked to his teachers about his peers. He called it the “State
of the Students” address. In it, he talked about the students’ eagerness to
learn and how much the staff i
nfluences the lives of the kids (even when it
doesn’t seem like it). To me, this exemplifies collaboration within a school to
a T. When you have staff and student leadership coming together to create a
safe, fun, cohesive learning environment with common g
oals, good things
happen.

The second thing that stood out to me was simply the fact that all
these teachers were gathered in this cold auditorium for several hours for a
common goal of getting ready for an awesome school year. They were
Jessica Brown


August 23
rd



September 5
th


bouncing ideas off

of each other, asking questions and creating community. If
that isn’t collaboration, I don’t know what is.

Based on my Foundations classes I took last year, I know that the ASB
speech and this meeting were very important in creating a safe, functional,
le
arning environment where everyone works together. In Dr. Ruby K. Payne’s
book,
A Framework for Understanding Poverty
, she states, “The development
of emotional resources is crucial to student success. The greatest free
resource available in schools is the
role modeling

provided by teachers,
administrators and staff,” (Payne, 67). Here, we see that teachers have huge
impacts on students’ lives. The ASB president addressed this in his speech
when he told the staff how much they mean to the students and that i
f they
were ready to teach, the student body was ready to learn. The staff was
meeting for that purpose. To get ready to teach, build teams and create
c
ommunity. Collaboration happens when staff
“talk freely, are concerned
about the achievement of their g
roup goals, feel that their colleagues are
helpful, and refer to their co
llectivity as “we”’ (Miller, 7). According to Miller,
this is the definition of a team, and as we know, teams exemplify
collaboration by working towards a common goal. The goal at Bra
ve High
was clearly to provide a safe learning environment that allowed all students
to achieve. John M. Brucato writes, “The culture of any school is determined
by the attitude and behavior of the teaching staff,” (Brucato, 60). This first
meeting at Bra
ve High set the tone for the staff and for the entire school year
as one of improvement and collaboration.

Jessica Brown


August 23
rd



September 5
th


References

Brucato, John M.
Creating A learning Environment
.
Lanham: Scarecrow Education,


2005. Print.

Miller, Rima.
Team Planning for Educational

Leaders
. Philadelphia: Research for


Better Schools, 1987. Print.

Payne, Ruby K., Ph.D.
A Framework for Understanding Poverty
. 4
th

ed. Highlands: aha!


Process, Inc., 1996. Print

















Jessica Brown


August 23
rd



September 5
th


2.

August 27
th



7:50am (and the rest of the day)


First Day Fun!


It is very different being in a high school for the first day of school
without being a student. Especially at my old high school’s rival school, but
since it has the best program in the state, I got o
ver it. I was very curious to
see how Mr. Bard started up his year. Would there be a lecture with a long
list of rules? Or would he just skip over all of it and go right into rehearsals?
Well, I sure found out. The first thing Mr. Bard did in all of his cl
asses was
play games. That’s right. Games. First, we played a simple name game called
“that’s great”, which got the kids up and moving and out of their comfort
zones. Then we playe
d some pattern games with balls, which got the kids
thinking. When you have
two balls going one direction in the same pattern
and one ball going in the opposite direction of the pattern, things get a bit
confusing, but it is fun and all connects to theatre and creating bonds.


At first glance, many parents, teachers and students m
ay wonder how
this creates collaboration
and why it is important. Let me explain


playing
games is fun right? On the first day of school it is important to create a bond
with your students (especially in a theatre department where they will be
with you fo
r the next 4 years). Having fun together creates bonds. Playing
games breaks down barriers. It also gets the students to trust each other. Mr.
Bard’s main rule in the ball pattern game was “make the person catching look
good. It is NOT about you.” By sayin
g tha
t and playing a game that causes

kids
to understand that concept, a bond is created. A team starts to form. Creating
a cohesive team that trusts each other and is willing to look silly getting the
Jessica Brown


August 23
rd



September 5
th


job done is the first step towards collaboration. Mr.

Bard was beginning to set
a foundation for the rest of the year.

Mr. Bard’s style is all about the kids. He wants to form relationships
with them and
for good reason. According to Dr. James Comer, “No significant
learning occurs without a significant rel
ationship,” (Payne, 9). By playing
games with his students on the first day, Mr. Bard was starting to form
relationships with them and encouraging them to build relationships with
each other,
and not just any relationships, but r
elationships that are self
less.
Remember

the rule? Make

the person catching look good
.
By presenting this
rule in an uncomplicated way, Mr. Bard was helping the students understand
and succeed in a common goal. In
Teaching with the Brain in Mind,
by Eric
Jensen, he says that teach
ers should, “be straightforward, not sarcastic,
circuitous, or patronizing” (Jensen, 31). Mr. Bard always respected his
students with the way he spoke to them, which created a safe, positive
atmosphere ready for collaboration.
These students in the theatre

department will be spending the next 3 years together. It is important that
foundations for healthy, trusting, fun, appropriate relationships are started
on the very first day and that is exactly what Mr. Bard did. The first step in
learning about someone

and creating a bond is to learn a person’s name. The
name games Mr. Bard had the class play were brilliant because it got the
st
udents moving. According to Jensen

getting up and moving can

“strengthen
learning, improve memory…and enhance learner motivatio
n and
morale,”(Jensen 60).


By playing these games, Mr. Bard was helping the kids
Jessica Brown


August 23
rd



September 5
th


learn each other’s names faster, boost moral and motivate them to be
involved in his class even more. As I watched over the following week, I could
already see strong bonds
forming and all the students knew each other better
because of the first day fun!


References

Jensen, Eric.
Teaching with the Brain in Mind
. 2
nd

ed. Alexandria: ASCD, 2005. Print.

Payne, Ruby K., Ph.D.
A Framework for Understanding Poverty
. 4
th

ed. Highlands: aha!


Process, Inc., 1996. Print