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Northern Territory Council of Social Service







NTCOSS Engagement and Workforce Development
Project

July 2011


December 2012




Summary Report December 2011



NTCOSS Summary Report December 2011 Workforce Development


Page
2


Table of Contents

Context
and Background

................................
................................
................................
.........................

3

Methodology

................................
................................
................................
................................
...........

3

The Findings

................................
................................
................................
................................
............

4

Sector Capacity

................................
................................
................................
................................
...

4

The Housing situation

................................
................................
................................
.....................

5

Health Services

................................
................................
................................
................................

5

Workforce

................................
................................
................................
................................
...............

6

Staff accommodation

................................
................................
................................
..........................

6

Recruitment and retention of qualified staff

................................
................................
......................

7

a)

Attracting and retaining staff locally or from interstate

................................
.........................

7

b)

Growing a local workforce

................................
................................
................................
......

8

The case for a Territory specific training organisation

................................
................................
.......

9

Mode of Training

................................
................................
................................
...............................

10

Content of Training

................................
................................
................................
...........................

10

Ideas about supporting Aboriginal Workers

................................
................................
.....................

11

Supervision and Peer Support
................................
................................
................................
...........

11

Good Practice models in engaging Aboriginal communities

................................
............................

12

CALD services

................................
................................
................................
................................
....

12

Partnerships

................................
................................
................................
................................
......

12

Organisational Capacity

................................
................................
................................
........................

13

Summary

................................
................................
................................
................................
...............

14

Attachment A

................................
................................
................................
................................
........

15

Attachment B

................................
................................
................................
................................
........

16








NTCOSS Summary Report December 2011 Workforce Development


Page
3


Context and Background


The Growing Them Strong Together Report

reviewed child protection
practices
in the
Northern Territory
. The report

was published in October 201
0
. O
ne of the
key
recommendations

relating to the Non Government Sector

reads as follows
:


That the Northern Territory Government makes a

very

significant and sustained new
investment in the development

(and expansion)

of a suite of secondary prevention,
therapeutic and reunification services for vulnerable and at
-
risk children, families
and communities. The majority of these services should be provided by the non
-
government
sector and

administered through
an enhanced

No
rthern Territory
Famili
es and Children grants program. The investment in such services should
involve new rather than redirected funding and within a five year period, should
match or exceed the combined Northern Territory Families and Children expenditure

in statutory child protection and out of home care.’
(Northern Territory Government
2010,
Growing Them Strong, Together: Promoting the safety and wellbeing of
the
Northern

Territory’s children
, Report of the Board of Inquiry into the Child Protection
Syst
em in the Northern Territory 2010, M.Bamblett, H. Bath and R. Roseby, Northern
Territory Government, Darwin, p.27)

There is a clear recognition within the report that
to date

the Northern Territory non
government sector
is

underdeveloped and is
not

meeting

the demand for child and family
spec
ific services. The few organisations

that

currently

provide child and family serv
ices are
not specialist organisations

but do provide
child and family services

as part of their
general
service provision.
All
services
,

in
particular

those

in remote communities

face major
challenges
such as
lack of infrastructure,
geographical isolation
, workforce issues and
organisational capacity.
T
he Northern Territory has a populat
ion with high and complex
needs.

Northern Territory children
are

the most disadvantage
d

on many different levels
in
comparison

to

other Australian children. (see Silburn SR, Robinson G, Arney F, Johnston K,
McGuinness K
Early childhood development in the NT: Issues to be addressed

. Topi
cal paper
commissioned for the public consultations on the Northern Territory Early Childhood Plan.
Darwin: Northern Territory Government, 2011)
Increasing the capacity of

th
e sector to take
on the

task of providing a suite of secondary prevention, therape
utic and reunification
services is an enormous undertaking and requires a planned and coordinated approach.


Methodology

NTCOSS is contracted by the Department to assist in
building workforce

and organisational

capacity within the
non government
sector.

The aim of this project
is

to identify
work force
and organisational issues impacting on the sector

s

capacity to deliver high quality, culturally
NTCOSS Summary Report December 2011 Workforce Development


Page
4


competent and sustainable services
. The ultimate goal is to
develop
innovative
strategies to
address them.

C
urrently the Department of Children and Families funds

65 services. 4
9

services were
consulted about their issues, the majority of consultations were conducted as face to face
interview
s
, some
,

in particular services in remote

locations

as a phone interview
. T
wo were
received electronically. Most services

appr
eciated

the opportunity to express their
views in
depth

and
valued
their thoughts
being considered
.
Once the
consultation w
as

finalised the
summary and the
recommendations
were sent

as

a draft

document to

all indi
viduals
consulted to ensure the document
reflected their

opinions and everybody
agreed with the
recommendations.
The original plan of holding a focus group was abandoned out of concern
that the small Aboriginal controlled or
ganisations would be unlikely to be represented if the
focus group

or groups were

going to meet in Darwin
and

Alice Springs.

Services consulted ranged from family support services to youth services, crisi
s
accommodation including women’s

safe houses and s
ervices providing
out of Home care.
T
he majority

were

NGOs except 4
who

were
part of
Shires or local councils.

Location of Service Provision

Urban, Darwin and Alice Springs

61%

Regional Centres, Katherine, Tennant Creek, Nhulunbuy

17%

Remote communiti
es

23%

NT wide such as peak bodies

4%


It came
as

no surprise that
the
different circumstances

of the bigger national organisations
based in Darwin or Alice Springs
resulted in different needs and priorities to
the small
organisations based in remote communities, though
surprisingly

they also had
many
commonalities.


The Findings

Sector Capacity

C
ommunity
services

provision within the Northern Territory is
impacted

on

by a widely
dispersed population with compl
ex needs
,

an underdeveloped community sector

and lack of
infrastructure
especially
in remote communities
.

There was the overwhelming perception
that current service provision was not meeting the demand for services in the Territory.

Due to the Board of
Inquiry report there is a focus on the development of family and
children’s services
.
However
it was evident that
other areas such as the provision of housing
and health services are as crucial for the wellbeing of children and families.

NTCOSS Summary Report December 2011 Workforce Development


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5


The Housing situa
tion

The lack of availability of housing, long
-
term as well as crisis accommodation is well
documented.
This issue was seen as the absolute priority by 98% of services consulted.
Th
e
housing

situation leaves many NGO workers looking for accommodation for
homeless
families rather than addressing parenting issues or providing counselling or other
inter
vention
s

on more complex issues. The overcrowded situation
,

in particular in remote
communities increases the risk of children
being

exposed to family violence

and sexualised
behaviour.

It is not the aim of this report to discuss the housing situation in the Territory. I would like to
refer to
NT Shelter
’s 2012/13 Pre
-
Budget Submission for further details and
recommendations. However
in this context
the need fo
r more crisis accommodation is
evident.





Health Services

It became clear in the consultations that there are other areas where there are significant
gaps and
short comings in particular

community
health services. While
services

such as
alcohol and other drugs and mental health and disability services
provide support
for adults
in the first instance, they are directly related to a parent’s capacity to bring up t
heir
children. It
was evident
that

NGOs, when faced with mental health or drug an
d alcohol
issues of parents,
work with the
issues
getting little support from those specialist services
,
due the already heavy demand they are facing.
This

add
s

more stress an
d

increases the

workload
of
community workers. Most community workers
are not

experts in the mental
health or drug and alcohol field, therefore missing
critical
aspects of necessary intervention.
All best intentions and

the
effort of the family support wor
ker can be in vain if these health
issues are not addressed.
The need for better coordination between family services and the
mental
health
f
ield was highlighted. There

appears to be a gap in the understanding of the
relationship between trauma
,

such as fa
mily and sexual violence
,

on the mental health of
the victim

and the

children involved.

Non government agencies expressed the need for
specialist
mental health and alcohol and
other drug services for children and young people.

For more details on
identified gaps in services please s
ee Attachment A
.



Recommendation

Increase bricks and mortar available to crisis accommodation services.

NTCOSS Summary Report December 2011 Workforce Development


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6











Workforce

Staff accommodation

Staff accommodation is still

a critical

issue for services. The lack of suita
ble staff
accommodation is a

major hurdle in the ability to fill positions. The Northern Territory
Government has been aware of this problem for a long time and faces similar issues for
their own
employees
. The problem varies in its shape in different locations.

Darwin and Alice Spr
ings: Cost of housing in relation to low pay, Housing is unaffordable
and
NGO workers find it hard to make ends meet. Depending on further developments
regarding the wage equity case this situation might be more favourable in the future.

Ten
n
ant Creek and

Nhulunbuy:
there are
rarely any

houses available

on the private market
and most NGOs do not have the resources to build or buy their own.
It
is

impossible to
recruit new workers due to the lack of housing.
If worker
s

are in existing positions they
find
it

difficult to

move into other
positions as often the house goes with the job.

Growth towns: Positions are kept vacant as there are no houses available for NGO workers
.
NGOs do not have access to the government housing pool.

Local Aboriginal workers working in government positions
are not eligible for the same
housing allocation as the
ir non
-
Aboriginal
counterparts, which create

its own challenges and
tensions.



Recommendations:

o

For Department of Health to
build the capacity within the community
mental health
service

sector and the alcohol and other drug sector

o

For Department of Health to build the capa
city of services to respond to mental health
and AOD issues of children and young people.

o

For Department of Health and NGOs working in the mental health or AOD area to have
better understanding of the impact of mental health and AOD issues on the ability
to
parent. Referrals to and
better
coordination between family support services and
health services are needed.

o

For Department of Health
and DCF to build better understanding of the effects of
family and sexual violence on the mental health of the victims

and children affected.

NTCOSS Summary Report December 2011 Workforce Development


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7








Recruitment and retention of qualified staff


84%
of

NGOs consulted

experienced difficulties
in recruiting

enough qualified

and
experienced

staff.
Managers
expressed concern

about the small pool of suitably

qualified
people
to deal with the

complex need
s of

clients within the Territory.

Strategies to address the shortage of qualified and experienced staff for the Territory are
divided into two major streams;
a)

attracting and retaining staff from interstate

and b)

growing a local workforce.

a)

Attracting and retaining staff

locally or from

interstate

There are several barriers to recruiting qualified staff locally or from interstate.
The reasons
given in order of priority were

o

Low

pay (83%)

o

Lack

of accommodation (72
%)

o

Location

(70%)


o

Stressful

work (40%)

o

Working

conditions (14%)

Refuges and safe houses believed that the working hours
including
being on call was
one of
the
major barrier
s

in attracting staff.

Workers within the sector hope that the wage equity case will alleviate some of the financial
pressure on workers. So far the Territory Government has not given a clear commitment to
meet new wages with funding increases. Even with the expected increases i
t will be
necessary to pay workers above award to attract people to remote locations. There needs
to be appropriate funding so NGOs can attract qualified and experienced staff.

Even if

successful in attracting qualified staff from the southern states, many

new recruits
may

have limited experience that equips them sufficiently to face the complexity of service
provision in the Territory. Further professional d
evelopment is needed. It is

evident that
ongoing professional

development and support
provides motivation
and builds skills for
all
Recommendation:

o

For the Department of Infrastructure and P
lanning to increase land release and develop
planning incentives in particular in places such as Tennant Creek and Katherine.

o

Nhulunbuy: For the Department

of Infrastructure and Planning

to negotiate with ALCAN
to increase land release and plan housing development.

o

Growth Towns: For the Northern Territory Government to extend eligibility of NGO
workers for allocation of government housing

o

Staff hou
sing allocation to extend to

Aborigi
nal staff

NTCOSS Summary Report December 2011 Workforce Development


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8


workers
,

including
new graduates
and

experienced and mature workers
. It assists in feeling
supported
and
stay
ing

motivated within their work situation.
Continuing professional
development encourages reflection and evaluation of work practices and enhances
the
quality of service provision. The lack of opportunities for professional supervision within the
Territory was also highlighted. While the larger org
anisation had processes in place the
smaller ones were struggling to provide adequate supervision, which was often provided
over the phone by supervisors from ‘down south’.

There was the perception that professional
s

often lacked the Cultural Competency n
eeded
to work in
the Territory environment. A one day cultural awareness training as offered to
many workers was not seen as enough to prepare
them
for the cultural complexities they
are dealing with. Most services felt that ongoing reflection and training

around
cultural
awareness and knowledge
was needed.







b)

Growing a local workforce

The second strategy to address the lack of qualified staff in the Northern Territory is
to
grow
our own local workforce, in particular growing an Aboriginal workforce to reflect the client
gro
up. This would not only ensure

cultural safety for clients, but
also increase

local
ownership of service provision, provide Aboriginal employment and role
modelling to

encourage economic independence and emotional wellbeing.

Aboriginal controlled
non government
organisation
s

were much more successful in
employing
A
bor
iginal staff,
as an average 66%

of their staff is Indigenous, compared with

25% average in mainstream organisations. The Shires had a high rate of Aboriginal
employment mostly due to the nature of their core business around essential services.

There are m
any barriers to Aboriginal employment
,

one of them being the lack of education
and skill
s of

A
boriginal people particular
ly
in remote communities.
Any attempt to provide
training and skill development has to be comprehensive and address the structural
disa
dvantage that Aboriginal people face
, such as education, health and
housing.

Service
providers especially
from remote communities
talked about the importance of
any
training being driven by the local community, rather than being implemented from the top
Recommendation:

For the Territory Government to commit funding of services
to match
the increase of wages
expected under the wage equity case.

NTCOSS Summary Report December 2011 Workforce Development


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9


do
wn.
The idea of p
roviding courses which can lead to a certificate level II, III or IV in remote
communities was welcome
d by service providers

but
additional support is required

such as
on the job training, mentoring and coaching rather than just training that leads to a
certificate.
On the job training and buddying systems were seen as favourable option for
job skill development.


The case for a Territory
specific training orga
nisation

It was
evident

that
to date

training initiatives in

the

Territory

are uncoordinated and ad hoc.
The current practice within the NGO sector is that one NGO decides on organising a specific
training event, inviting other
NGOs to

participate.

So far
there is no overall plan, to address
the
skills shortage within the sector.

D
ifferent departments

within the Northern Territory government have their own approach
to

the
training and skill development
for
their staff. As an example the Department of
Educa
tion and Training has

its
own plans
to

address

the need for early child
hood workers in
growth towns.

As yet
there is very little collaboration about workforce development, while
the
knowledge and
skills required
for working in health, child and family
,

early childhood
,

youth
,

justice
,

disabilities or aged care

are overarching and easily transferable between
different areas.

A
n

overarching Territory specific training and workforce support
organisation could

address
most of these issues. Such an organisation would
have the capacity to provide a

workforce
development

plan that
focuses on the child and family sector recognising that there a
re

key
competencies which are transferable to the whole
of the community

sector

such as health,
early childhood, youth,

j
ustice,

disabilities and aged care.

This s
hould include training and
professional development for professionals, cultural competency trainin
g and development
and growing a remote

Aboriginal workforce. This o
rganisation should also have the capacity
to provide professional supervision
.

A professional development
plan and
structure
for DCF and NGO workers
should
sit within
and be guided by
a quality
improvement framework.
Such a quality improvement
framework should be developed collaboratively
by the Depar
tment of Children and Families
and the NGO sector. I
deally
this should
include other relevant Departments such as Health,
DET and Justice.

Decision
s

on training to be prov
ided could come from identified need through the
workforce development plan and also
by

demand
of

service providers.

Government
departments could
also
access the training.



NTCOSS Summary Report December 2011 Workforce Development


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10











Mode of Training

NGOs consulted were clear the preferred mode of receiving training was combined training
with workers from other organisations including government workers. Joint professional
development was seen as an opportunity to increase understanding of each other a
nd
reduce cultural
barriers.
This was seen as a way of forming better working relationships and
increasing collaboration between services.

For organisation
s

in remote communities and regional centres t
his preference
needs

to be
balanced with the

need to

have training in their
own community.
NGOs found it too
expensive and too time consuming for staff to travel to urban centres. To be accessible any
training has to be provided in regional and remote communities

as well as in urban centres.



Content of T
raining

The consultations with DCF funded services highlighted the need for professional
development in many areas.

Training in Cultural Competencies and Working with Children
and Young People with Behaviour issues topped the list and was mentioned by 67%

of
services consulted. Building respectful relationships, mental health and trauma followed.

Please see
Attachment

B

for
detailed listing.

The need for ongoing professional development around cultural competencies was the most
passionately argued about
; se
rvice
s

being clear that one off training is not sufficient.
Achieving cultural competency is an
ongoing process

and needs to have ongoing support
and reflection.


Recommendation:

For DCF to fund the establishment of a Territory specific t
raining organisation which has the
following functions:

o

Identify training needs in the Northern Territory and develop a coordinated approach
with other stakeholders to meet those needs

o

Develop partnerships between existing training providers and research

organisations

o

Provide ongoing professional training for qualified community services workers

o

Assist in the development of a local workforce

o

Provide training, mentoring and coaching to a local workforce

o

Provide ongoing supervision and support to exis
ting community services staff

For DCF to provide ongoing core funding to such an organisation


NTCOSS Summary Report December 2011 Workforce Development


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11


Ideas about supporting Aboriginal Workers

All organisations acknowledged the extra difficulty which Aboriginal workers face, such as
traumatisation and living conditions, split loyalties when working with families, cultural
obligations and establishing professional boundaries.

Mo
st organisations
have developed

strategies to support their Aboriginal workers.

L
arge

Aboriginal controlled organisations appeared to have more developed thinking and
strategies in place to support their Indigenous workforce. The organisational structure
and
culture
was se
en as the most important aspect in supporting and developing Aboriginal
staff.
Other strategies included flexibility in case allocation to avoid conflict of interest,
flexibility in work practices to allow for cultural obligations, taking clan structur
es i
nto
account when recruiting and

recognising different wor
l
d views. Most agreed that Aboriginal
workers need good peer support and supervision. Frank and open communication between
workers and management was also seen as a priority.

Clear policies and proce
dures were
seen

as

necessary to provide clear guidance in a complex environment.
C
ultural knowledge
needs to be valued as an integral part of required skills

regarding
job

descriptions and pay
scales.
Cultural knowledge needs to be acknowledges as a skill
set.

Working in pairs
with

an Aboriginal worker and a non
-
Aboriginal worker was seen as a
successful model
allowing

two
-
way learning of cultural and professional knowledge transfer.

The importance of leadership in creating motivation for working was also recognised.

Most services agreed that debriefing, supervision and access to counselling w
ere

essential
to support Aboriginal workers.
Other ideas were: Employ an Aboriginal cultural
advisor to
the CEO,

conduct
daily staff meetings and skin group meetings,


Supervision and Peer Support

77
% of services consulted expressed the importance of professional supervision
, 91%
believed in the benefit of peer support. There needs to be opportu
nities for remote workers
to at
tend network meetings in regional centres or the bigger growth towns as well as
facilities to access teleconferences.

A Good Practice Model

in Establishing Supervision

The Education Centre against Violence

is a
NSW
organisa
tion which provides NSW
-
wide
specialised training, consultancy and resource development for NSW Health and interagency
workers who provide services to children and adults who have experienced sexual assault,
domestic or Aboriginal family violence and/or ph
ysical and emotional abuse and neglect.

The organisation
makes professional supervision compulsory as part of the advanced
diploma, so students get used to the process from the beginning and see as an integral part
of their practise.

NTCOSS Summary Report December 2011 Workforce Development


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12


The supervisors are c
alled clinical consultant
s

who are professional experts who in turn are
supervised by a
n

Aboriginal cultural supervisor. Students and workers can address their own
trauma history in these sessions.


Good Practice models in engaging Aboriginal communities

The Education Centre against Violence
in NSW has developed the following practice model:
The organisation runs information and family violence awareness sessions in Aboriginal
communities inviting the general community. These sessio
ns create interest and

motivate
community members who want to work in the field are encouraged to engage in further
training.
There needs to be clear pathways for people to move from the community
awareness sessions to a Certificate III or IV.
This method provides more safety f
or future
workers as the community is engaged and workers have the endorsement of the
community. The community engagement session also create an understanding of the
worker’s role and responsibility.

The training position
s

for training in Aboriginal
comm
unities

and Aboriginal workers are
dedicated Aboriginal positions. If they remain vacant due to the lack of skilled applications a
non
-
Aboriginal worker can fill the position but has to mentor an Aboriginal person. This
Aboriginal person is employed under
a traineeship agreement.


S
ervices

for people from Culturally Diverse Background

For services working with CALD communities
similar thoughts prevailed in particular a
round
cultural competency.
Cultural competency is seen as a process which is ongoing and

needs
to be supported by the organisation.

T
here is an acknowledgment about the importance of providing professional and
emotional
support

for workers from CALD background
. On the job training, coaching and mentoring is
seen as critical in addition to courses.
Developing an organisational culture which supports
the celebration of difference and values cultural expertise was seen as critical.

Partnerships

In conversations
with representatives form Human Services Training Advisory Council
(HSTAC), Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education and Charles Darwin University
(CDU) it became clear that better coordination of training is needed. All recognise the
enormous
need for building skill levels and providing ongoing training. The idea of a new
body to drive the coordination was welcomed. It is critical that any training or workforce
support organisation focusing on the NGO sector will work in partnership with these

existing
players in the field.
We have yet to meet with
Menzies School of
Health
, the organisation’s
knowledge and expertise will be invaluable to any capacity building in the child and family
field.

NTCOSS Summary Report December 2011 Workforce Development


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13


Organisational Capacity

The non
-
government organisat
ion
s

contracted by the Department of Children and Families
providing services in the Northern Territory range from National and international
organisations such as the Red Cross and Mission Australia to small locally based
organisations such
as Ruby

Gaea

o
r the women’s refuges in Darwin, Katherine

and

Ten
n
ant
Creek
. Then there are the local Aboriginal
corporations

in
urban areas as well as in remote
communities. Some of these are quite large agencies whose core business is around CDEP
and business enterpris
e, community services being an add
-
on. However some fund their
community services arm out of profits made from the business arm.
Some community
services in
particular

the women’s safe houses and some youth services in remote areas are
provided by the local

shires.

Obviously
this wide range

of service

size and structure has implications for
organisational
capacity and

governance of agencies. T
he bigger national organisations can draw on
organisational capacity and corporate knowledge and support from
interstate, some are
registered as an RTO and provide their own training in house. In contra
st the smaller
organisations experience difficulty covering the workload when staff
are

taking part in
training. There is usually no funding to backfill positions f
or absent staff due to illness,
recreational leave or training leave.
Overall 77% of services felt that funding by DCF was
inadequate to provide the contracted services.

One of the ba
rriers

to participating in training mentioned was the lack of workers
,

in
particular in small organisations. There is an enormous pressure on small organisation
s

with
just 3 or 4 workers if 2 of these are absent for training for a few days. There needs to be
some solutions about backfilling positions adequately. Funding leve
ls need to acknowledge
the cost of training including transport and backfill.
Training provided locally can assist in
addressing this.

However the advantage of the small local organisations in particular in remote communities
is their ability to connect a
nd represent the local community and recruit local staff.





Surprisingly 62% of organisations were able to recruit suitable management and admin staff,
however most organisation
s

felt that training in
management would be beneficial, in
pa
rticular in the foll
owing areas, Staff Supervision (67%), Project Management (65%) and
Human Resource Management (51%). Please see Attachment

B

for more detail.


Recommendation:

For Northern Territory Government to recognise the specific needs of isolated workers and
adjust funding of services accordingly to allow for professional development and capac
ity
building of the workforce and the organisations.

NTCOSS Summary Report December 2011 Workforce Development


Page
14


While some of these training needs can be addressed by the recommended training
organisation in the future, NTCOSS is committed to continue and broaden its training
initiatives in these areas

in the near future
.


Summary

While this project was specifical
ly targeting DCF funded services it became clear that an
overall coordinated approach to workforce and organisational capacity building is needed.

It needs to be r
ecognis
ed

that some of the barriers to recruiting staff lie
clearly
outside the
scope of the

D
epartment of Children and Famili
es such as staff accommodation. The
consultation also highlighted the need for better service coordination between health and
children and families in particular around mental health and AOD services. This confirms the
int
erdepartmental approach that has been taken by the Child Safety and Wellbeing
Director’s network. The network can take a critical role in ensuring all departments take on
the responsibility to improve services for children and families and drive

the coordi
nation of
services further.


NTCOSS Summary Report December 2011 Workforce Development


Page
15


Attachment A

Gaps in Services

as per consultation with DCF funded services in order of
priority

December 2011

Question: Is there an unmet need for any of the following services


1.

Housing

98%

2.

Parenting

84%

3.

Mental Health

76%

4.

Out of Home Care

67%

5.

AOD Services

61%

6.

DV & Family Violence

57%

7.

Disabilities

55%

8.

Health

53%

9.

Job Services

47%

10.

Aboriginal Childcare

45%

11.

Play Groups

41%

12.

Sexual Assault

41%

13.

Financial Services

31%

Other

Mentoring for Young people



Mental health & AOD services for young people



Early Childhood Services



Dental



Activities for 5
-
10 year olds, after school activities,
diversionary activities, Early intervention, Grief & loss,



Perpetrator program,



Men’s homelessness

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Women’s Refuge does not take sons over 11, excluding
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NTCOSS Summary Report December 2011 Workforce Development


Page
16


Attachment B



Training needs as per consultation with DCF funded services in order of
priority


Professional Development

Question: In particular we need Professional
Development

in the following areas; Please
prioritise



1.

Cultural Competencies

67%

2.

Working with Children & Young People with Behaviour Issues

67%

3.

Building Respectful Relationships

61%

4.

Mental Health

58%

5.

Trauma

55%

6.

Child Abuse

51%

7.

Child Development

51%

8.

Child Safety

48%

9.

Community Development

48%

10.

Family Support

48%

11.

DV & Family Violence

47%

12.

Parenting Skills

45%

13.

Alcohol & other Drugs

43%

14.

Counselling

49%

15.

Sexual Assault & Abuse

49%

16.

Parenting Teenagers

45%

17.

Working with Young People

35%

18.

Court Support

33%

19.

Group Work

31%

20.

Attachment Issues

20%

21.

Early Childhood

16%

22.

Post Natal Depression

14%





NTCOSS Summary Report December 2011 Workforce Development


Page
17


Organisational Capacity

Question: Would your organisation benefit from training on

1.

Team Building

59%

2.

Workforce Development Planning

57%

3.

Performance Management

57%

4.

Succession Planning

51%

5.

Governance

49%

6.

Strategic Planning

49%

7.

Research &

Evaluation

47%

8.

Securing alternative funding

47%

9.

Building Partnerships

47%

10.

Individual Supervision

42%

11.

Business Planning

34%

12.

Financial Management

33%

13.

Anti Bullying

29%



Professional Development for Managers

Questions:
Your organisation would also benefit from professional development in:

1.

Staff Supervision

67%

2.

Project Management

65%

3.

Human Resource Management

51%

4.

General Management

39%

5.

IT

39%

6.

Financial Management

31%