EDTE 776 Educating African American Students - College of ...

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University of South Carolina

College of Education

EDTE 776

Educating African American Students

June 8
-

July 2, 2009

1:00
-
3:15 p.m.

CDRC 219





"Education is how a society hands out its life chances.


How it gives people options.


Philosophers sometimes

say the best definition of freedom is a good range of options.


A
new revolution in learning would give many more Americans real freedom."


Peter Jennings


I.

Descriptive Information:

A.

Course Number and Title:




EDTE 778

Educating African American Students

B
. Bulletin Description:

An analysis of historical and contemporary factors that influence the
education of African American children in the U.S. Emphasis on the
knowledge, skills and dispositions required by educators and parents to
provide an effective
and equitable education for African American
students (3 credit hours).

C.

Course Credit:
3

credit hours

D.

Prerequisites:
None



Corequisites:

None

E.

Intended Audience:
Education majors
--
masters degree or above




F. Instructor:

Dr. Gloria Boutte






104

Wardlaw






Phone: 777
-
2018





gsboutte@mailbox.sc.edu

G.
Office Hours:

By appointment




II.

Statement and Course Goals and Objectives



A.
Goal:

T
o develop proficiency usin
g
c
ulturally relevant pedagogy and
effective education
al strategies for
African American students.




B.


Objectives:

1.

Examine the challenges and opportunities for educating African American
students in urban, rural, and suburban environments.

2.

Examine hi
storical and contemporary perspectives on educating African
American children


2

3.

Analyze the explanations of differential achievement of African American
children and other children of color.

4.

Evaluate research on aspects of the school experiences of African A
merican
students.

5.

Describe the characteristics of successful school/classroom models that promote
high achievement among African American children from various socioeconomic
statuses.

6.

Design and implement culturally relevant lessons and activities for Afr
ican
American students.

7.

Compare and contrast the rules for African American Language and Standard
English.

8.

Demonstrate knowledge of African American culture in written assignments and
class discussions.


III.


Required Texts, Resources and Key Readings:



A.

L
adson
-
Billings, G. (2009
).
The dreamkeepers. Successful teachers of African
American children

(2
nd

ed.)
.

San Francisco: Jossey
-
Bass.

B.

Perry, T., Steele, C.
, & Hilliard, A. III. (2003).
Young, gifted, and Black:
Promoting high achievement among Afri
can
-
American students.

Boston: Beacon
Press.

C.

Additional required readings are posted on
Blackboard.


IV. Academic Course Requirements:


A
.

Participation (100 points)
--

You are expected to attend all classes and to be
prepared to discuss major points

(read required readings and complete
assignments). It is your responsibility to obtain any missed assignments or notes
from other students enrolled in the course. Grade for participation includes active
and informed participation in the class.


B
.

Daily
Reports

(13

@ 20 points each)



For most

class meeting
s
, you will give a brief oral report on one of the assigned
readings. At the beginning of class, a few minutes will be allotted for
collaboration with others who were assigned the same reading
.


Your 5
-
7

minute mini
-
report should include:



1
.

An analyses of
salient points
for the reading.

Do not just summarize the

reading or give definitions. Efforts to make the presentation engaging

are expected. For example, a visual, song, student wo
rk,

quote, or other symbol which conveys a major point of the reading will
make the report more interesting


3

2
.

A
critique

of the reading

in terms of its usefulness to your life/profession,
educational implications, problems with the concept, and its
rel
ationship
to other readings
(from this and other courses).

This is an important
aspect of the assignment.

3
.

Points that you found most
compelling

or points that you
resisted

4
.

Points which
need clarity
.

5
.

New
insights

that will be helpful for teaching

African American students
and possible
related strategies
.



**While the mini oral report is a group report and the group will collectively

receive one grade,
each student should have his or her

notes
available instead of

relying on memory for the repor
ts. Additionally
,

I will routinely elicit individual

reports during the discussion.

For
Blackboard
assignments, a written report with

all of the components above will be email to me at
gsboutte@mailbox.sc.
edu

by

midnight on the day that the assignment is due.


C
.

MAJOR PROEJCT: CHOOSE 1 OR 2
.

(1

Research Paper

or 2
--
Book
Critique)


1
.
RESEARCH PAPER

(100 points

paper; 50 points

presentation)





This assignment is designed to help develop research
and writing skills. Choose a



topic relating to African American students.




a
.

Use APA documentation style.



b
.

Include a thesis statement, a
n analytical

review of the literature, summary, and
implications

for educators.
Your thesis statement will g
uide your overall
paper.
One source

for writing literature reviews can be found on
Blackboard
in
Course

Documents
. Feel free to use other sources as needed.



c
.

I
nclude references to
a variety of sources such as research articles, applied




works, and
books.
You may reference books and governmental reports as
well
, if needed
.





d
.

E
mai
l your
topic,
thesis statement
,

and tentative outline by
June16.








2
.

BOOK CRITIQUE

--
(100 points

paper; 50 points

presentation)


Read and carefully critique one
of the following books. It should be evident from
the review that you have read the book. The critique should include the
following:

A) A brief overview of the book (about one paragraph)

B) A discussion and analyses of major concepts the author is trying

to
communicate for
each
chapter

C) The relevance of the book to your personal and professional life (
also relat
e
your discussion to other

readings
).
It is very important that you analyze the

4

book in relation to conc
epts from the class readings.

These r
eadings should
be cited in the reference list.

D
) Strengths and weaknesses of the book (may refer to published reviews of the
work, but also go beyond these). Reviews can be found via literature searches or
by looking in
Books in Print

which is available
in most libraries. Unofficial
reviews can also be found on Amazon.com or other similar online bookstores


Choose one of the following books.

i.

Delpi
t, L., & Dowdy, J. K. (2002).
The skin that we speak: Thoughts on



language and culture in the class
room.

New York: The New Press

ii.

Foster, M. (1997).
Black teachers on teaching
.

NY: The New York

Press.

i
i
i.

Ford, D
. Y., & Harris, J. J. (1999).

Multicultural gifted education
.


Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

i
v
.


Freire, P. (1972/2000).
Pedagogy of the op
pressed
.

NY: The Continuum


International Group, Inc.

v
.

Hale,
J. E. (2001
).


Learning While Black: Creating educational

excellence for African American children
.


Baltimore, MD:


The Johns
Hopkins University Press.

v
i
.

Irvine, J. J., & Armento, B. J.

(2001).
Culturally responsive teaching.

Lesson planning for elementary and middle grades.

Boston: McGraw
-
Hill.

vii.

King, J. E. (2005).
Black education. A transformative research and
action agenda for the new century.
Mahwah, NJ: Routledge.

vi
i
i
.

Kunjufu, J. (2007).
An African centered response to Ruby Payne’s

poverty theory
. Chicago: African American Images.

ix
.

Perry, T., & Delpit, L. (1998).
The real Ebonics debate: Power,
language, and the education of African
-
American children.

B
oston:
Beacon Press.


V. Administrative Requirements



A. Attendance and active, informed class participation at all classes are required.


B. Instructor must be notified in the event of absenteeism. More than one absence will
adversely affect grade.


VI.


Evaluation and Grading:







Participation









100

Daily Oral Reports (13

@ 20 points each)





26
0

Major Project









100

Presentation











50

Total










51
0














5

485
-
510

= A


459
-
484

= B+


434
-
458

= B


408
-
433

= C+


383
-
407

=C


357
-
382

= D+


332
-
356

= D


331

and below = F


VII.


Major Topics of the Course



1.

Conceptual Framework for Course

(Pedagogy of the Oppressed)


2. Historical Perspectives on the Education of African American Students

A.

African Perspect
ives

B.

Slavery

C.

Post Slavery

D.

Court Cases

E.

Desegregation


3. Educating African American children in the 21
st

Century

A.

Explanations for the Differential Achievement of African American
Students

B.

Culturally Relevant Pedagogy

C.

Successful School/
Classroom models

D

Transformative Research and Practice for Black Students




4. African American Language


5. Critical Literacy


6. Teaching Content Areas (language arts, music, science, art, social studies, math)


7. African A
merican Families and Communities


8. Culturally Relevant
Classroom
Management


Tentative List of Videos

Black
Is, Black Ain’t




Theresa Perry

Gloria Ladson Billings



The Road to Brown



English for Your Success



The Eye of the Storm


True Colors





Constructivist Math

A Detroit Conversation



A Charge To Keep

Excerpts from: Ethnic Notions


VIII.

Modes of Instruction



Class Meetings:

Class Meetings: Monday
-

Thursday




Time: 1:00
-
3:15 p.m.


6



References


AACTE. (2003).
Culture, language, and
student achievement: Recruiting and
preparing teachers for diverse students
.

Washington, DC: AACTE.

A Call to Action.

(2004). Assessment of Diversity in America’s Teaching Force.
Washington,

DC: AACTE.

Banks, J. A., & Banks, C. A. M. (2001).
Multi
cultural education/Issues and
perspectives.

(5th ed.). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Barba, R. H. (1995).
Science in the multicultural classroom. A guide to teaching
and learning
.
Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

*
Boutte, G. S. (2008). Believing in possibilities
: The Center of Excellence For
The Education and Equity of African American Students (CEEEAAS).
The State of
Black South Carolina.

*Boutte, G. S. The critical literacy process. Guidelines for examining books.
Childhood Education, 78
(3), 147
-
152.

*B
out
te, G. S. (2007). Teaching African American English speakers: Expanding
educators and student repertoires. In M. E. Brisk, (Ed.).
Language, culture, and
community in teacher education
. London: Routledge.

Boutte, G. S., & Hill, E. (2006). African

American communitie
s:
Implications
for Educators.
New Educator, 2,

1
-
19.

*
Brown et al. v. Board
of Education of Topeka et al.

In

Annual editions. Race
and ethnic relations 00/01
, pp. 19
-
21. Guilford, CT
: Dushkin/McGraw
-
Hill.


7

Center on Education Po
licy. (2001).
It takes more than testing. Closing the
achievement gap.

1001 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 619. Washington, DC 20036.

Cook, T. (1998). Opening Pandora’s Box: An interview with Oakland school
board member Toni Cook.. In T. Perry & L
. Delpit. (eds.),
The real Ebonics Debate:
Power, language, and the Education of African
-
American children.

(pp. 172
-

179).
New York: Teachers College Press.

*Delpit, L. (1986).

Skills and other dilemmas of a progressive black educator.
Harvard
Educational Review, 56 (4),

379
-
385.

Delpit, L., & Dowdy, J. K. (2002).
The skin that we speak: Thoughts on
language and culture in the classroom.

New York: The New Press.

*Delpit, L. (1988).
The silenced dialogue: Power and pedagogy in educating
ot
her people’s children.
Harvard Educational Review, 58 (3),

280
-
298.

*
Dred Scott v. Sandford. In

Annual editions. Race and ethnic relations 00/01
,
pp. 10
-
16. Guilford, CT: Dushkin/McGraw
-
Hill.

*Durbin, K. (2005). Books under fire.
Teaching Tolera
nce (Spring),
46
-
51.

*Fordham, S. (1988). Racelessness as a factor in Black students’ school success:
Pragmatic strategy or Pyrrhic victory
? Harvard Educational Review, 58 (1),

54
-
84

Gage. B. L. (2002). Listening to the voices of African American male
s. In G.
Boutte (Ed.),
Resounding voices: School experiences of people from diverse ethnic
backgrounds

(pp. 43
-

62). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

*Graham, S. (1992). Most of the subjects were White and middle class. Trends
in published research o
n African Americans in selected APA journals, 1979
-
1989.
American Psychologist, 47
(5), 629


639.


8



*
Heath, S. B. (1982). Questioning at home and at school: A comparative study.
In G. D. Spindler (Ed.),
Doing the ethnography of schooling: Educational
anthropology
in action

(pp. 96


131). New York: Holt, Rinehart, & Winston.


*Hilliard, A. G. (1992). Behavioral style, culture, teaching, and learning.
Journal
of Negro Education, 61,
(3), 370
-
377.

Hopkins, R. (1997).

Educating black males. Critica
l lessons in schooling,
community, and power.

New York: SUNY Press.

Irvine, J. J., & Armento, B. J.
(2001).
Culturally responsive teaching. Lesson
planning for elementary and middle grades.

Boston: McGraw
-
Hill.

Jonsberg, S.D. (2001). "What's a (Whit
e) teacher to do about Black English?"
English Journal
, 90 (4), 51
-
53.

King, J. E. (1994). The purpose of schooling for African American children. In
E. R. Hollins, J. E. King, & W. C.
Hayman (eds.),
Teaching diverse populations.
Formulating a knowledge

base,

(pp. 25

56). New York: SUNY

Press.

Kozol, J. (2005).
The shame of the nation: The restoration of apartheid
schooling in America.

New York: Crown.

Kunjufu, J. (2007).
An African centered response to Ruby Payne’s poverty
theory.

Chicago:
African American Images.


Ladson
-
Billings, G. (2000). Fighting for our lives: Preparing teachers to teach
African American students.
Journal of Teacher Education, 51

(3), 206
-
214.

*McIntosh, p. (1995). White privilege and male privilege. A personal acco
unt of
coming to see correspondence through work in women’s studies. In P. H. Collins & M.

9

L. Anderson (Eds.),
Race, class, and gender: An anthology

(pp. 70
-
81). Belmont, CA:
Wadsworth.



*Ogbu, J. U. (1994). Overcoming racial barriers to equal access.

In J. I.
Goodlad and P. Keating. (eds.),
Access to knowledge: An agenda for our nation’s
schools,

(pp. 58
-

89). New York: College Entrance Examination Board.

*
Plessy v. Ferguson. In

Annual editions. Race and ethnic relations 93/94
, pp.
19
-
21
.

*
Race and ethnicity in the American legal tradition. In

Annual editions. Race
and ethnic relations 00/01
, p. 7. Guilford, CT: Dushkin/McGraw
-
Hill
.


*Rousseau, C. , & Tate, W. F. (2003).
No time like the present: Reflecting on
equity in school mathem
atics.

Theory Into Practice, 43
(3), 210
-
216.

Steele, C. M. (1992). Race and the schooling of Black Americans.
The Atlantic
Monthly, 269 (4),

68
-

78.


Steinberg, L. , & Fletcher, A. C.
(1998). Data analytic strategies in research on
ethnic minority y
outh. In V. C. McLoyd, & Steinberg, L. (eds.),
Studying minority
adolescents.


(pp. 279
-
294). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.



Swick, K. J., Brown, M., & Boutte, G. (1994). African American children and
school readiness: An

analysis of the issues.
Journal of Instructional Psychology, 21 (2),

183
-
191.

Villegas, A. M., & Lucas, T.
(2002).
Educating culturally responsive teachers.
A coherent approach.

New York: State University of New York.


10

*
Weinstein, C. S.,
Tomlinson
-
Cla
rke, S., & Curran, M. (
2004).
Toward a
Conception of Culturally Responsive Classroom Management
.
Journal of Teacher
Education
,
55
(1), 25
-
38.

*
Whitney, J. (2005). Five easy pieces: Steps toward integrating AAVE into the
classroom.
English Journal, 94

(5), 64
-
69.




































11



Tentative Agenda


Date


Topic






Reading/Assignment




June 8


Course Overview and Conceptual Framework

Freire, Ch.

4

African American Families/Demographics

Morris

Why study the U.S.

Video: True Colors





South


June 9


Guest Facilitator: Dr. Michelle Jay


Ladson
-
Billings, foreword;



African American Culture




preface; ch. 1; ch. 2




Video:

Black Is, Black Ain’t



Boykin

Afrocultural











Expression









daily oral report 1 (submi
t









via email)


June 10


Blackboard

No On
-
site class



Race and ethnicity in American



Historical Perspectives





legal tradition



Slavery







Dred Scott v

Sanford









daily oral report 2

(submit









via email)













June 11


Historical Perspectives




1) Plessy v. Ferguson



Post
-
Slavery





2) Brown et al. v Board of



Video: The Road To Brown



Topeka



Presenter: Dr. George Johnson



daily oral report 3





Segregative Intent and the Achievement Gap



Stages of Racia
l Identity



Video Excerpts: Ethnic Notions

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

June 15


African American Language



1)
Boutte

Teaching AAE











speakers









d
aily oral re
port 4










Decide on class project


June 16


African American Language



1) Delpit

What should


Video: English For Your Success teachers do?









2) Delpit

pp. x
-
9/Intro,etc.









3
)

Skills and other










Dilemmas









4
) Delpit

The silenced










dialogue









daily oral report 5



June 17


Culturally Relevant Pedagogy (CRP)


1)Ladson
-
Billings


Ch. 3 and 4



Video: Ladson
-
Billings,
I ain’t



2) Hilliard

Behav
ioral style,



Writin’ nuttin’






culture, and teaching









daily oral report
6


12


June 18



Critical Literacy





1) Boutte

Critical literacy



2) Durbin

Books Under Fire


3) Christensen

Unlearning the

4) Kohl

The politics of

5)

McNair

the represent
ation


6) Boutte

Perspectives

dail
y oral report 7

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

June 22


Culturally Relevant Pedagogy



1)Ladson
-
Billings


Ch. 5 and 6



Video: Eye of

the Storm



2) Boutte

African American



Cameos of CRP teachers



daily oral report 8



June 23


Culturally Relevant Math



1) Berry

Access to upper

Video: Constructivist Math



2) Martin

Missionaries and

Ethnomathematics





Cannibals







dai
ly

oral report 9











June 24


Culturally Relevant Pedagogy



1)
Ladson
-
Billings

Ch. 7
;










Afterword










2) McIntosh

White privilege

d
aily oral report 10



June 25


Young, Gifted and Black



Perry et. al.
--
preface;



Video: Theresa Perr
y




Up from the Parched Earth;









Ch. 1
--
Freedom for Literacy


daily oral report 11

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


June 29


Young, Gifted and Black



Perry et. al










Ch. 2
--
Stereotype Threat




June 30


Young, Gifted and Black



1)
Perry et. al
--
Ch. 3



Theorizing Transformative




No Mystery





Black Education Research and Practice

2) King

A Transformative



Videos: A Charge to Keep and

vision





A Detroit Conversation



3)
Graham

Most of the









4) Steinberg/Fletcher

Data









5) Lerner

Changing organism










daily oral report 12



July 1


Culturally Relevant Management


1) Beaton
--
Rethinking











discipline









2) Clark
--
Expectations









3)
Franklin

Reflections on









4)
Kohl
--
I won’t learn from you









5
) Weinstein
--
Toward a









6
) Brown
--
Urban teachers’ use









Daily oral report 13

July 2


Presentations



Recap and

Wrap Up