Superconductivity = electronegativity x electropositivity divided by (transition temperature)^2 Re: Superconductivity related to Fusion; Fusion Barrier Principle

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Superconductivity = electronegativity x
electropositivity divided by (transition
temperature)^2 Re: Superconductivity related to
Fusion; Fusion Barrier Principle
Source: http://sci.tech-archive.net/Archive/sci.chem/2005-02/0753.html
From: Archimedes Plutonium (a_plutonium_at_iw.net)
Date: 02/13/05
Date: Sun, 13 Feb 2005 01:43:42 -0600
I wanted to say :
Superconductivity is equal to Electronegativity + Electropositivity divided by
transition temperature.
The idea being that Superconductivity is where atoms or molecules repel electrons
and attract electrons in a cold environment to the point where electric current
is produced. So that a Superconductor is nothing more than an extreme case of
electronegativity coupled with electropositivity.
But it would not be addition but rather instead multiplication with division for
temperature. I want to say addition because it is the coupled action of the
electropositive to repel an electron and the electronegative action of attracting
an electron so that these two coupled forces generate a "self current" when
powerful enough and it is powerful enough when the temperature approaches 0 K.
Pure elements are superconductive at very low temperatures and one may well ask
how does a pure element have both electronegativity and electropositivity? That
is a good question and the answer I have is that at very low temperatures the
Coulomb force of the nucleus attracting and the electrons repeling create a
electronegativity and electropositivity.
And according to Linus Pauling electronegativity values Fluorine is the most
electronegative at 3.98 and Cesium is the most electropositive at .79 and when we
multiply these two together we get 3.14.
Now the Ba_La_Cu_O perovskite of 35K has a electropositive Ba of .89 and O of
3.44 electronegativity for a multiplied value of 3.06.
Then there is the Y_Ba2_Cu3_O_ perovskite of 90K whose electronegative and
electropositive values match the 3.06. However, this 90K compound has many more
electroposivite and electronegative atoms than does the 35K, for the oxygen atoms
of this 90K perovskite has 9 or more oxygen atoms compared to the singular oxygen
atom of the 35K.
sci.chem: Superconductivity = electronegativity x electropositivity divided by (transition temperature)^2 Re: Superconductivity related to Fusion; Fusion Barrier Principle
Superconductivity = electronegativity x electropositivity divided by (transition temperature)^2 Re: Superconductivity related to Fusion; Fusion Barrier Principle1
So, if we were to multiply all of the atoms in the 35K perovskite and then
multiply all the atoms in the 90K perovskite and then divide by the transition
temperature or possible the square of the T_c so that this is a Inverse square
rule the same as the Coulomb force itself.
I have not yet worked out the math on the above but it appears to me to be
fitting in place.
If the above is true that Superconductivity is an inverse square law identical to
Coulombs law only with charges replaced with electronegativities and with
distance replaced by Transition Temperature.
Only I remember that temperature is usually the inverse of time, not distance. So
maybe I need to adjust the above formulations.
Archimedes Plutonium
www.iw.net/~a_plutonium
whole entire Universe is just one big atom where dots
of the electron-dot-cloud are galaxies
sci.chem: Superconductivity = electronegativity x electropositivity divided by (transition temperature)^2 Re: Superconductivity related to Fusion; Fusion Barrier Principle
Superconductivity = electronegativity x electropositivity divided by (transition temperature)^2 Re: Superconductivity related to Fusion; Fusion Barrier Principle2