SCIENCE UNIT PLAN – Grade 11 Physics[1]x - StFX ...

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SCIENCE UNIT PLAN


Grade 11 Physics

Unit: Momentum and Energy

Brock Fraser


Topics:


1) Conservation of Momentum



2) Work, Power & Efficiency




3) Transformation, Total Energy & Conservation



4) Technological Implications


Practicum Duration:

Nov
14, 2011


Dec 17, 2011 (
~
5 weeks =
~
25 days
* 1class/day
=
~
25 classes/unit)


Tentative
Schedule:

Classes 1
-
4: Conservation of Momentum

Classes 5
-
8: Work, Power & Efficiency

Classes 9
-
20: Transformation, Total Energy & Conservation

Classes 21
-
24: Technolog
ical Implications

Class 25: Assessment





















Class

Lesson

Outcomes (stse, skills,
knowledge)

Students will be expected to…

Lesson Strategy (hook,

activities,

etc)

Assessment Tools
(worksheets, hw,
problems)

Resources
(webpages, text, etc)

1

Introduction
to concepts of
elastic and
inelastic
collisions and
conservation
of kinetic
energy
.



Apply quantitatively
the law of
conservation of
momentum to one
-
dimensional
collisions and
explosions.

(326
-
3)






Hook: Automobile crash video



Unit analysis.



In
troduce the idea of elastic and
inelastic collisions, allow
students to discuss among each
other.



Provide
example of rail carts
colliding. Do calculations with
simple numbers and show the
relationship between the
variables (
p
=m
v
)



Allow students to use
computers
to access 1
-
D momentum
physics applets.




Homework

Problems
:
assessment for
learning

(
A
)

Homework
Activity: write
down what they
think they know
about energy and
momentum (save
this).



Evaluate their
ability to predict
the nature of
certain
collisi
ons
/explosi
ons
.


McGraw
-
Hill Ryerson:
Physics
:
Ch 7.3
Conservation of
Momentum


Youtube Video:
http://www.youtube.
com/watch?v=kHJeW
-
Px03c&feature=relate
d



Applet:
http://www.walter
-
fendt.de/ph14e/collisi
on.htm


2

Newton’s 3
rd

Law &
Conservation
of Momentum



Apply quantitatively
the law of
conservation of
momentum to one
-
dimensional
collisions and
explosions.

(326
-
3)






Hook: A transfer truck collides
with a remote controlled car,
who exerts more force? (3
rd

Law)



Give mathematical and graphical
representation of Newton’s 3
rd

Law and conservation of
momentum.



Photo Analysis











Homework
Probl
ems:
assessment for
learning (
B
).



Group work on
board problems.


McGraw
-
Hill Ryerson:
Physics:
Ch 7.3
Conservation of
Momentum


Photos:
http://www.flickr.co
m/photos/physi
csclas
sroom/galleries/7215
7625280491634/


3

Bringing
together the
concepts of
conservation
of momentum



Apply quantitatively
the law of
conservation of
momentum to one
-
dimensional
collisions and
explosions.

(326
-
3)




Have students compare and
contrast
inelastic and elastic
collisions and give examples.



Reinforce the relationships
between velocity, mass and
momentum.



Assign

class
text book questions
to be worked on collaboratively
and passed in.



Take the
temperature of
the class to gain a
sense of how
st
udents are
handling
concepts.



Grade their in
-
class
questions.

McGraw
-
Hill Ryerson:
Physics:
Ch 7.3
Conservation of
Momentum

Questions 25
-
29,
p.315
-
317

4

Conservation
of Momentum
Lab:
conservation
of momentum
and energy.



Apply quantitatively
the law of
conservation of
momentum to one
-
dimensional
collisions and
explosions.

(326
-
3)




Have four to five stations set up
for groups to rotate through.



Station 1: with carts, track,
weights, ruler and stopwatch so
they can calculate momentum
and velocities.



Statio
n 2: Graphical
conservation of momentum
station
.



Station 3: Online Applet
Experimentation



Station 4: Skateboard/roller
-
chair demonstration.



Lab report to be
graded.



Critical response
to be taken in
also, assessment
for learning.

Lab materials


Applet:
http://www.walter
-
fendt.de/ph14e/collisi
on.htm



5

Introduction
to Work.



Analyze
quantitatively the
relationships among
force, distance, and
work (325
-
9)




Hook:
How were the pyramids
built?
(video)



Discuss students’ definitions of
work
,
unit analysis.



Sc
alar quantities vs. Vector
quantities



W=
F

d
=Fdcos

; force
acts in
same direction as displacement.



Finish with a small assessment
of learning (
C
).




Assessment of
comprehension
of concept of
work

(
C
).



Homework:
Develop a word
problem

(
with
pictorial
representation)
on
work
.




Wind
-
Up Toy
exercise.






Youtube Video:
http://www.youtube.
com/watch?v=6CpjMx
XG52s


Exercise
: McGraw
-
Hill
Ryerson: Physics:
Ch 6
Work, Power, &
Efficiency
, p. 217


6

Introduction
to Power.



Analyze
quantitatively the
relationships among
work, time, and
power (325
-
10)




What does it mean when a light
bulb has“60 Watt” printed on it?



Build upon concept of
work
,
explain
power

is the rate at
which work is done.



Add
time
parameter to the word
problem developed for
homework to make it now a
power

exercise.



Read article
China Now World
Leader in Wind and Hydro

give
your opinion on renewable
energy sou
rces (
D
).



Homework
:
Compare and
contrast
power

and
work

(200
word max)
.




Homework
:
Activity:
What Is
Your Horsepower

(
p. 267)



7

Work, Power
& Efficiency



Analyze
quantitatively the
relationships among
force,
distance, and
work (325
-
9)



Analyze
quantitatively the
relationships among
work, time, and
power (325
-
10)





Discussion:

Causes of
inefficiency? W
here is energy
lost in

machinery?

Conservation
of energy?
Why is efficie
n
cy
important to Nova Scotia
Power?

Why do many electrical
appliances radiate heat?



Explain how efficiency is
calculated.



Examples of energetically
inefficient and efficient
machines around us.







Homework
problems from
text.




Assessment for
learning: analysis
of discussion.

Homework:

McGraw
-
Hill Ryerson:
Physics:
Ch 6 Work,
Power, & Efficiency,
Questions: 1, 4,
10, 15,
18, 28, 38, & 39
.

p.274
-
277

8

Laboratory &

Discussion




Design and carry
out an experiment
to determine the
efficiency of various
machines (212
-
3,
213
-
2, 213
-
3, 214
-
7)



Break into manageable

groups
and carry out the lab (
E
).



Speak and discuss the principles
of the lab while students
experiment.



Allow for creative modification
to the lab procedure.



Formal lab report
to be graded.



Students also
marked on their
group work
and
communication
skills.



Lab materials
mentioned in lab hand
out.

9

Work &
Energy:
Gravitational
potential,
elastic
potential and
kinetic
energies.



Analyze
quantitatively the
relationships among
mass, speed, kinetic
energy, and heat
using the law of
conservation of
energy (326
-
1)



Describe
quantitatively
mechanical energy
as the sum of kinetic
and potential
energies (326
-
5)




Hook: Physics pendulum v
ideo



Discuss the different forms of
energy,
potential

&

kinetic

and
relate them to
work
.



Analyze some pro
blems as a
class, using conservation of
energy.



Show animation

of potential and
kinetic energy relationship



Discuss energy

forms

presented
in photos.



Homework:
Students are to
chose two photos
from class and
explain the
physics involved.


Youtube video:
http://www.youtube.
com/watch?v=yVkdfJ
9PkRQ&feature=playe
r_embedded


Animation:
http://
www.teachers
domain.org/resource/
hew06.sci.phys.maf.ro
llercoaster/


Photos:
http://www.flickr.co
m/photos/physicsclas
sroom/galleries/7215
76251993
07955/#ph
oto_3902626997



10

Work &
Energy:
Gravitational
potential,
elastic
potential and
kinetic
energies.



Analyze
quantitatively the
relationships among
mass, speed, kinetic
energy, and heat
using the law of
conservation of
energy (326
-
1)



Describe
quantitatively
mechanical energy
as the sum of kinetic
and potential
energies (326
-
5)




Hook:
Hockey

Collision Video
.
Why contact sports are
dangerous.



Focus on numerical calculations
and solidifying concepts of
energy types.



Explain how to analyze
conserva
tion questions. Total
energy before = total energy
after.



(PE+KE)
before
= (PE+KE)
after
:
p
roper
f
ormulae



Apply conservation of energy to
a pendulum, weight on a spring,
or other examples.



En
ergy Transformation Activity
(
F
)



Class problems
on board with
input from
students.



Homework: How
many forms of
energy can you
think of? Give
examples.


Energy
Transformation
Activity Sheet


Youtube Video:
http://www.youtube.
com/watch?v=CqjcPO
VJ2eU&feature=relate
d


Explanatory

Video of
Work Energy
Theorem:
http://www.curriki.or
g/nroc/Introductory_
Physics_1/lesson07/C
on
tainer.html

11

Energy
Transformati
on:
Learning
Centers



Compare empirical
and theoretical
values of total
energy and account
for discrepancies
(214
-
7)



Analyze
quantitatively
problems related to
kinematics and
dynamics using the
mechanical energy
concept
(326
-
6)



Energy Transformation
Stations:

1) Block sliding down
ramp. 2) Pendulum with
different rope length and
weights. 3) Model Problems

(McGraw
-
Hill Ryerson:
p. 292
)
:
Horizontal Elastic Collisions
(change
m
,
k
and

x
)



Hydroelectric Energy Video

Clip



Homework
: Read
and respond to
Conceptual
Problems


p.

282, 283.
Also
r
ead
the
article:
One
-
Quarter of
World’s
Population Lacks
Electricity:

Scientific
American.


Lab Materials: B
locks,
ramps, meter stick,
stop
-
watch.


Article:
http://www.scientific
american.com/article.
cfm?id=electricity
-
gap
-
developing
-
countries
-
energy
-
wood
-
charcoal


Youtube Video:
http://www.youtube.
com/watch?v=Em63N
l74UQ8&feature=play
er_embedded



12

Discussion on
Article.


Incorporating
kinematics
and dynamics
into
conservation
of energy
problems.






In

groups discuss the reading.
Think

of ways you could use
physics to address this issue.
What are the obstacles? If
money was not an object, what
could you do?



Introduce the idea of analyzing
kinematic and dynamics
problems with conservation of
energy.



Usi
ng algebraic methods to
rearrange equations seen in
previous lessons to solve energy
problems.









Homework
Problems

Homework:

McGraw
-
Hill Ryerson:
Physics:
,
Questions: 5
& 8.

p. 287


13

Simple
Harmonic
Motion



Analyze
quantitatively the
relationships
among
mass, speed, kinetic
energy, and heat
using the law of
conservation of
energy (326
-
1)



Describe
quantitatively
mechanical energy
as the sum of kinetic
and potential
energies (326
-
5)




Explain Hooke’s law



Class activity: SHM Applet



Given the parameters
of a
oscillating spring

and mass
,
determine its velocity, KE and
PE at 4 points not including
when KE=0J or when PE=0J




Take in
assignment as an
assessment for
learning.



Observe how
students are
handling
concepts.


Applet:

http://www.walter
-
fendt.de/ph14e/spri n
gpendulum.htm


14

Paper
-
based
Lab: Learning
from
graphical
methods.



Analyze
quantitatively
problems related to
kinematics and
dynamics using the
mechan
ical energy
concept (326
-
6)



Analyze
quantitatively the
relationships among
mass, speed, kinetic
energy, and heat
using the law of
conservation of
energy (326
-
1)



Describe
quantitatively
mechanical energy
as the sum of kinetic
and potential
energies (326
-
5)





Hook: Tony Hawk’s Perfect Run
(video)



Activity:

Students will construct
a graph of
energy
vs.
stretch

for
a mass going from X
0

to X
max
.
They will plot curves for spring
potential energy and
gravitational potential energy.



Plotting this data on the same
graph will provide insight into
the nature of the energy
transformations in a SHM
system.



Nail hammered into wood: Ways
energy is lost? Energy Transfer?



Find a similar
example to the
energy lost while
hammering a
nail. Explain the
transformations.

Youtube
Video:
http://www.youtube.
com/watch?v=2Q
-
asRRZYF0&feature=re
lated



15

Energies of a
Falling Mass



Analyze
quantitatively
problems related to
kinematics and
dynamics using the
mecha
nical energy
concept (326
-
6)




Complete
Table A

(
G
)
for a
falling object of any chosen
mass.



Discuss how we can use a
similar approach to projectile
motion in two dimensions.



Delve into

two dimensional
kinematics/dynamics problems.



Take in

completed table

for assessment at
the end of class.

Table A
(
G
)

16

Work
-
Energy
Theorem




Analyze common
energy
transformation
situations using the
closed system work
-
energy theorem
(326
-
7).



Discuss how work can change
an object’s potential energy,
thermal energy or other
form of
energy.



Class Activity:
Applying the
Work
-
Kinetic Energy Theorem
.
Step through problem as a class.



Clarify any confusion about this
theorem, do example problems
on board with input from
students.



Homework:
Present a song,
poem, speech or
short
story to
your peers that
involves physics
terms an
concepts of this
unit (
~
½
-
1

page).

Class Activity:
McGraw
-
Hill Ryerson:
Physics:
Ch 6 Work,
Power, & Efficiency, p.
242


17

Total Energy

&
Conservation



Analyze and
describe examples
where technological
so
lutions were
developed based on
scientific
understanding
(116
-
4)



Determine the
percentage
efficiency of energy
transformation

(326
-
8)



Technological Developments:
Airbags, ABS brakes, goalie gear
,
bulletproof vest
. What others
are there?




Stuck in a boat on

a frictionless
lake.




Rollercoaster: PE & KE. Friction
on track. Theoretical frictionless
track?




Potential Energy, Kinetic Energy
and energy loss due to friction in
the form of heat. Efficiency?







Homework
Activity:
Complete & show
calculations/reas
oni
ng:
Work and
Energy
Worksheet
(solutions
included)

(
H
)

Take home Handout

18

Total Energy

&
Conservation



Distinguish between
problems that can
be solved by the
application of
physics
-
related
technologies and
those that cannot
(118
-
8).



Determine which
laws of
conservation,
momentum, and
energy are best
used to analyze and
solve particular
real
-
life problems in
elastic and inelastic
interactions (326
-
4)



Hook: Wile E. Coyote Video



Airbags help prevent injuries
during car accidents, but wh
at
are the factors that cannot be
addressed by physics? Bad
drivers? Icy roads? Fog, rain,
snow? Etc.



Where can do we the
conservation of momentum &
energy to our advantage?



Examples of elastic vs. inelastic
collisions in our lives. When is
elastic ideal/
unwanted, when is
inelastic ideal/unwanted?



Homework:

Come up with 5
examples of
technological
innovations
related to the
principles of
energy and
momentum
conservation

to
present to class.

Youtube Video:
http://www.youtube.
com/watch?v=L9AcR
2Bltxw&feature=relat
ed


19

Group Lab
Project



Design an
experiment, select
and use appropriate
tools, carry out
procedures, compile
and organize data to
answer a question
posed regarding the
conservation of
energy (212
-
3, 212
-
8, 213
-
2, 214
-
3,
214
-
5, 214
-
11, 326
-
4).










Homework
presentations/discussion.



Present the idea of designing an
experiment to demonstrate
their knowledge of energy
conservation.



Break into small groups to
discuss and w
ork on lab project.



Students can access the Internet
and any other resources to help
them develop a lab experiment
(to be approved by the teacher).



Assess
homework
presentation.



Determine how
things are
progressing in
the group work.

Internet, other
resources.

20

Group Lab
Project



Design an
experiment, select
and use appropriate
tools, carry out
procedures, compile
and organize data to
answer a question
posed regarding the
conservation of
energy (212
-
3, 212
-
8, 213
-
2, 214
-
3,
214
-
5, 214
-
11, 326
-
4).



All
ow class time to work on
group lab project.



Check on their progress since
last class, make sure they are on
the right track.



Meet with each group one
-
on
-
one and evaluate how they are
doing, provide guidance and
encouragement.



Make note of
each group’s
prog
ress so far,
and their
particular
experimental
idea.



Lab report will
be submitted
before unit is
completed.

Internet

Any necessary
classroom resources

21

Technological
Implications.



Analyze and
describe examples
where energy
-

and
momentum
-

related
technologies were
developed and
improved over time
(115
-
5, 116
-
4).



Describe and
evaluate the design
of technological
solutions and the
way they function
using principles of
energy and
momentum (116
-
6)



I
ntroduction: I
n class reading
,
helmets and
concussions.
Physics involved?



Technology
: Steel toe boots,
hockey helmets, crumple zones
(inelastic), hockey sticks, golf
club, running shoe (elastic).

Hitting the “sweet spot”



Research the history of the
technology its evolution to what
it is today.

Comp
lete for
homework if not completed by
the end of class.



The day’s task
will be handed in
next class and
evaluated.

Reading:
http://sports.espn.go.
com/ncaa/recruiting/
football/news/story?i
d=4392045


22

Technological
Implications.



Explain the
importance of
conventions when
describing events
related to
momentum and
energy (114
-
9).



Use this class to review the
terms, definitions a
nd concepts
of the unit.



Students should feel free to ask
questions to clarify anything
that is not well understood.




Assessment for
learning:
determining
where students
stand
academically
thus far.




23

Technological
Implications.



Analyze and
describe
examples
where energy
-

and
momentum
-

related
technologies were
developed and
improved over time
(115
-
5, 116
-
4).



Describe and
evaluate the design
of technological
solutions and the
way they function
using principles of
energy and
momentum (116
-
6)



Explain th
e
importance of
conventions when
describing events
related to
momentum and
energy (114
-
9).



Students will choose a particular
technological advancement
related to the unit and write a
scientific response to why they
feel it is important and how it
works.






Homework
problems
:
assessment of
learning.

Homework: McGraw
-
Hill Ryerson: Physics:
Ch 7 Conservation of
Energy and
Momentum,
Questions: 18, 19, 22,
&

24,
p.
308

24

Group Lab
Project



Design an
experiment, select
and use appropriate
tools, carry out
procedu
res, compile
and organize data to
answer a question
posed regarding the
conservation of
energy (212
-
3, 212
-
8, 213
-
2, 214
-
3,
214
-
5, 214
-
11, 326
-
4).



Allow

a class for students to ask
questions about their lab project
(due soon).



Also conduct a unit review,
t
aking questions and reviewing
concepts.



Determine the areas in which
students are proficient or
lacking understanding.



Students will reflect on what
they wrote for their first
homework assignment (
what
they thought they knew
).





Assessment for
learning:
practice
problems as a
class.



Assessment of
academic growth

Saved copy of
what
they thought they
knew about
momentum and energy

when
the unit began.

25

Unit
Assessment



This should
evaluate the
students’
understanding of
the concepts and
exhibit whether
they have reached
the
proposed
outcomes.



Conceptual questions



Calculations of work, energy,
momentum and efficiency.



Word problems



Multiple choice



Case study/article based on
technolo
gical advancements
related to these physics
concepts



This will assess
the course
outcomes. Some
assessment has
already been
done through
previous lessons.

Test (currently
unavailable)






























RESOURCES:


Paper Based

A)

Assessment for
learning: word problems

B)

Assessment for learning: word problems

C)

Assessment of learning: demonstrating understanding of concepts.

D)

Current Events Article: assessment of scientific literacy.

E)

Physics Lab: pulley as a simple machine

F)

Activity
: forms of energy
transformation

G)

Physics Lab: short cooperative lab

H)

Assessment

for learning:

review of work and energy (solutions provided)

I)

Text Book:
McGraw
-
Hill Ryerson:
Physics


J)

Pearson Addison Wesley: Physics, Student Solu
tions Manual

Video
s

K)

Youtube:

automobile crashes.

L)

Youtube
: how were the pyramids built?

M)

Youtube: interesting pendulum video.

N)

Web ani
mation: roller coaster animation

O)

Youtube: NHL hits.

P)

Curriki.org: interactive work
-
energy theorem video.

Q)

Youtube: hydroelectric energy clip.

R)

Youtube: Wile E. Coyote Video

S)

You
tube: Tony Hawk

Photos

T)

Flickr: photos of collisions

U)

Flickr: photos of work and energy

Applets

V)

1
-
D momentum/collisions applet (inelastic & elastic)

W)

S
imple harmonic motion
applet

Lab Equipment

X)

Glider track

Y)

Carts with wheels and places for weights

Z)

Stopwatch

AA)

Ruler

BB)

Calculator

CC)

Spring with weight

DD)

Pendul
um