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U
NIVERSITY OF
M
ARYLAND

C
OLLEGE OF
I
NFORMATION
S
TUDIES


LBSC

670:

O
RGANIZATION OF
I
NFORMATION

S
PRING
2013

|

S
ECTION
02
01

M
ONDAYS
,

J
ANUARY
28



M
AY
6
:

5:30



8:15

PM

H
ORNBAKE
B
UILDING



R
OOM
4113





Katy Newton Lawley

katy.lawley@gmail.com

301
-
454
-
0910
(voice, text)

Office:



Hornbake 4111G


Hours b
y appointment









I.

C
OURSE
D
ESCRIPTION AND
O
BJECTIVES

C
ATALOG
D
ESCRIPTION
:

Functions and evaluation of document and information retrieval systems; analysis and
representation of data, information,
knowledge, language, and text; metadata for the control
of documents and other objects.



C
OURSE
O
BJECTIVES
:



Understand the value and nature of recognizing and imposing structure on various types
of information and for various types of users and use situat
ions;



Recognize and differentiate different types of information representation, organization,
and retrieval systems and techniques;



Evaluate existing applications, techniques, and classifications from a user
-
centered
perspective;



Appreciate the capabiliti
es and limitations of various systems and how these might be
optimized or mitigated for different users and use situations;



Apply sound theoretical approaches to (1) the design and analysis of information
systems, and (2) representation of information for
organization and retrieval;



Understand the relationship between theories and practices related to the organization of
information.



The student should acquire the theoretical foundation needed for understanding and applying a
variety of techniques for cre
ating and searching traditional, modern, and future information
systems. In many cases, the course will not create full knowledge but awareness; the course also
serves as the basis for advanced work in other courses.


The emphasis is not on specific skills

but on concepts that enable the student to acquire a wide
range of skills as required by the tasks at hand over a life
-
time career. The course introduces
topics so students can discover interests they want to pursue in more depth later.



II.

C
OURSE
M
ATE
RIALS

C
OURSE
T
EXT
:

Taylor, Arlene G. & Joudrey, Daniel N. 2009.
The Organization of Information, 3
rd

ed.
Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited. ISBN 978
-
1
-
59158
-
700
-
2 (pbk)



O
THER
R
EQUIRED
R
EADINGS
:

Supplementary readings will be made available throughout the semester. Your syllabus will
direct you to the appropriate location and/or retrieval mechanism for each reading.



C
ANVAS
:

A module for this section of LBSC 670 has been created in
Canvas
.
In Ca
nvas, you will be
able to find:



The most up
-
to
-
date version of the syllabus and course calendar,



Power Point slides from each week’s lecture,



Reading guidelines to help you with some weeks’ readings (in Discussions section) along
with PDFs of readings not

freely available online,



Homework assignments,



Discussion boards for asking and answering questions with classmates, establishing study
groups, etc. You are welcome and encouraged to use discussions to ask for clarification on
readings, to debate or analyze points from class or readings, to post intere
sting articles or
events, etc. Remember: Your online presence is a component of your participation grade.





III.

G
RADING

Each element of your grade will be described in more detail below.



Participation 10%



Homework Assignments:

45
%



Exam:

20
%



Cou
rse Project:

25
%



IV.

P
ARTICIPATION

(10%)

In order to receive full credit for the Participation portion of your grade, you need to do more
than just show up. Please engage in classroom and online discussions for your own benefit
and to allow classmates
the benefit of your perspective.

Each student comes into the semester
with a score of 5 (out of 10) on participation. Your attendance and engagement can increase
or decrease your score from there.


Y
ou are responsible for all material presented during class, including announcements and
changes in the course calendar and syllabus. Also, your attendance in class is a component of
your participation grade. If you must miss a class, please notify the inst
ructor as soon as
possible, preferably before class. You should also contact one or more classmates to arrange
sharing of any notes and announcements you missed.


In the case of inclement weather, you are responsible for keeping abreast of the
University’
s

official
operating

status.
University

closures are announced

on the Web site
(
http://www.umd.edu
) and

via phone recording (
301
-
405
-
7669
). You may also sign up for
alerts via text, email, etc. by visiting:
http://alert.umd.edu
. The instructor will update the class
via email by 8:15 pm on the date of the closure to specify how the course calendar will be
adjusted.



V.

H
OMEWORK

(45%)

The homework portion of your course grade will be based on your performance on six
assignments. You must complete three theoretical assignments (usually essay
-
type questions)
and three practical assignments (usually practicing a skill). Throughout the cour
se of the
semester six theoretical assignments and six practical assignments will be made available to
you. The assignments will be posted to
Canvas.
Any given week, you will choose whether or
not you want to complete that week’s assignments.




Each assig
nment’s description includes its due date and time. Because you have the freedom
to pick and choose which assignments you complete, enforcement of assignment deadlines is
rigid
. Assignments should be emailed to the instructor as attachments. If the assignm
ent
includes content that can’t be emailed (such as hand
-
written diagrams), the entire assignment
should be handed to the instructor in person. Assignments will be returned with grades and
substantive feedback no later than two weeks after they are submitt
ed.



VI.

E
XAM
(20%)

There will be one exam given near the end of the semester to assess your understanding of
course concepts
, your ability to apply these skills and concepts,

and

your ability to articulate
how skills and concepts discussed in this cours
e apply to your work as current

and/or future
information professionals and scholars.






VII.

C
OURSE
P
ROJECT

(25%)

The project will be your opportunity to demonstrate that you can connect concepts that you
have learned over the course of the semester. To

that end, the project can be one of many
things, only a few of which are listed here:



A schema for a database, with accompanying text to describe the database’s functionality
and the theoretical underpinnings of the database’s construction;



A survey of l
iterature about a particular concept, process, technology, etc., that has to do
with the organization of information. If you focus on one topic, your discussion should
demonstrate an understanding of the breadth of forces that act on (or are acted on by)
y
our topic;



Critique of an existing thesaurus, classification, database structure, etc., probably with
some concrete suggestions for improvements or re
-
working;



Comparison of two or more systems that provide comparable services;



A concept map that depicts

a topic or topics of your choosing, with accompanying text to
describe nuances in relationships and/or rationale behind the ontological approach;



A reflective essay about what you have learned and how your mental framework(s) have
changed.


It can be diff
icult to choose a project early in the semester, when most of the course
mat
erial remains to be learned. A supplementary, optional class session will be scheduled
during which the instructor will preview upcoming topics, and we all may discuss
possibilitie
s for how course topics (past and future) might become project topics.




P
ROJECT
T
IMELINE AND
E
LEMENTS



TBD



Extra session: Preview of course topics and project discussion
.



3/25/2013


Project proposals due.



1/28/2013



4/29/2013



Project meetings.



5/6/2013


Project presentations in class.



5/13/2013
. 11:59 p.m.


Projects due.
Late projects not accepted.




P
ROJECT
P
ROPOSAL
:


The project proposal should be a brief description (one paragraph minimum, one page
maximum) of what you plan to do for the p
roject.
The proposal should be submitted like a
homework assignment: emailed to the instructor as an attachment.
While your project might
change substantially once you get underway, the proposal should describe your topic of
interest, the format(s) you are

interested in using for your deliverable, and a few words about
how your project will explore the intersection (or tensions) between the theoretical and the
practical. The content of the proposal will not be graded, but your failure to deliver a
proposal
on time will be reflected in the grade you receive on the final project.

You will
receive a ‘homework bonus’ for an on
-
time project proposal in the form of a ‘100’ on your
choice of homework assignments (theoretical or practical). Students whose proposals
are late
or do not meet the requirements specified here will not receive any homework bonus.



P
ROJECT
M
EETING
:


You are required to meet with the instructor
(in person or by Skype)
at least once to discuss
the plan and/or progress of your project. Meeting
s last for 15
-
30 minutes, during which time
the student and instructor will define specific characteristics and grading criteria. It is not a
presentation of your work for credit but rather an opportunity to get feedback and suggestions
before handing in a

final draft.




P
ROJECT
P
RESENTATIONS
:

On the last day of class, students will share with their classmates the work they have done so
far on their projects. These presentations are an opportunity for students to give and get a
sense of what kinds of concepts, connections, skills, and applicatio
ns their classmates have
encountered while researching or implementing their projects. Project presentations are not
formal presentations of finalized products. Rather, the presentations should be seen as
relatively informal discussions of the work done th
us far. In that vein, students are
encouraged to actively participate in each other’s presentations by asking questions and
offering ideas and feedback. These conversations can be a valuable opportunity to solve
problems and enhance the project before the
final deliverable is turned in a week later.


While the format of presentations is relatively informal, this does not excuse students from
actively preparing to present. On
-
screen projections (Power Point, Prezi, etc.) are optional,
but each student should

have prepared talking points and a discernible flow to his or her
presentation. The quality of your presentation will count for 15% of the project grade, and
grading criteria include:



Preparedness,



Ability to identify meaningful aspects of project to disc
uss,



Ability to communicate with audience,



Ability to keep presentation within time requirements,



Ability to manage and answer questions from audience.


P
ROJECT
R
EQUIREMENTS
:


Since project types will be highly variable, it’s not practical to list hard and

fast guidelines
and requirements. The following should give you an idea of what is expected. Through one
-
on
-
one interactions (including the required project meeting with me), we can establish more
customized guidelines that will ensure that your project i
s within an appropriate scope and
that the grading process is as fair and uniform as possible.



Project deliverable should comprise
8
-
12

pages of text, double
-
spaced, Times New
Roman, 12
-
point font, or, in the case of non
-
prose projects, the equivalent amou
nt of
intellectual content;



References from vetted, authoritative sources, including peer
-
reviewed scholarly journals
(appropriate quantity of references will depend on nature of project; consult with
instructor to determine);



APA
or MLA
citation format.



G
RADING
C
RITERIA



Ability to synthesize the theoretical/conceptual with the concrete/practical/pragmatic. In
addition to describing how theoretical principles are (or should be) embodied in practical
applications, you are also encouraged to explore confli
cts between the theoretical and
practical and how those conflicts might be mitigated;



Ability to apply meaningful document structure and design;



Ability to combine independent thought with cited basis in existing theory and/or with
examples from previous
research;



Factual correctness of project content;



Spelling and grammar.



VIII.

O
THER
I
MPORTANT
P
OLICIES AND
N
OTES



S
TUDENTS WITH
D
ISABILITIES

If you have a documented disability and wish to discuss academic accommodations with me,
please contact me as soon as possible. Likewise, if participation in religious observances will
affect your ability to complete course requirements as stated, please d
iscuss the situation with me
as soon as possible so that acceptable alternatives can be worked out.



A
CADEMIC
I
NTEGRITY

Along with certain rights, students also have the responsibility to behave honorably in an
academic environment. Academic dishonesty,
including cheating, fabrication, facilitating
academic dishonesty, and plagiarism, will not be tolerated. Any abridgement of academic
integrity standards will be referred directly to the campus judiciary. Confirmation of such
incidents will result in the e
arning of an "XF" grade for the course and may result in more severe
consequences such as expulsion. Students would be wise to familiarize themselves with the
University's Code of Academic Integrity at
http://www.president.umd.edu/policies/iii100a.html
.

Bottom line: If you have any questions about permissible behavior, ask first!



IX.

C
OURSE
C
ALENDAR



Date & Topic

Reading due at class time

Theory HW

Practice HW

1/28/2013

Session 1:



Course
introduction,



Information
-
seeking process,



User needs,



Introduction to
metadata

NA

Knowledge
Hierarchy /
Bloom’s
Taxonomy


2/4/2013

Session 2:



Relevance,



Categories,



Hierarchies,



Facets

Taylor & Joudrey, Ch. 1 & 2


Taylor & Joudrey, pp. 380
-

388

Monohierarchy
/ Polyhierarchy

Facets

2/11/2013

Session 3:



Learning &
cognition,



Ontology &
epistemology

Skemp, R.R. (1987). Chapter 2: The formation of
mathematical Concepts; Chapter 3: The idea of a Schema. In
The Psychology of Learning Mathematics,
Hillsdale, NJ:
Lawrence Erlbaum. [
Discussions


Reading Guidelines:
Session 3, PDF attachment
]


Lamon, M. (2003). Learning theory: Constructivist approach.
Encyclopedia of Education, 2nd ed., New York: Macmillan
Reference USA, Gale Group. pp. 1463
-
1467.
[Available via
UM Catalog as e
-
Book]


Leedom, D.K., Eggleston, R.G., Ntuen, C.A.. (2007).
Compare,
analyze Session
3 readings


Engineering complex human
-
technological work systems: A
sensemaking approach. Paper presented at 12th ICCRTS
(International Command and Control Research and
Technolog
y Symposium), Newport, RI, June 19


21, 2007.
http://www.dodccrp.org/events/12th_ICCRTS/CD/html/paper
s/030.pdf

2/18/2013

Session 4:



Databases I

Fehily, C. “Chapter 2. The Relational model.” In SQL: Visual
Quickstart G
uide. Berkeley, CA: Peachpit Press. pp. 33


44.
[
Discussions


Reading Guidelines: Session 4, PDF
attachment
]


Entity
-
relationship
diagram

2/25/2013

Session 5:



Databases II

Fehily, C. “Chapter 4. Retrieving data from a table.” In SQL:
Visual Quickstart

Guide. Berkeley, CA: Peachpit Press. pp.
87


126. [
Discussions


Reading Guidelines: Session 5,
PDF attachment
]



3/4/2013

Session 6:



Databases III



Tables +
SQL bonus

3/11/2013

Session 7:



XML,



Semantic Web

Tidwell, D. (2002). Introduction to XML. IBM
DeveloperWorks.
http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/xml/tutorials/xmlintro/


Berners
-
Lee, T., Hendler, J., & Lassila, O. 2001. The
semantic web. In Scientific American, v. 285, pp. 34
-

43.
Discussions


Reading G
uidelines: Session 7, PDF
attachment
.


Smith, M.K., Welty, C., & McGuinness, D. L., eds. (2004).
OWL Web Ontology Language Guide: W3C
Recommendation 10 February 2004.
http://www.w3.org/TR/owl
-
guide/ (NOTE! See reading
guidelines in Discussion forum before
reading this.)


The Wine Ontology (authors unknown).
http://www.w3.org/TR/owl
-
guide/wine.rdf (NOTE! Best
viewed in Firefox, or save file to your computer and open
using Wordpad. Also, see reading guidelines in Discussion
forum before reading this.)



3/18
/2013:

Spring Break




3/25/2013

Session 8:



ISARS

Bates, Marcia. (2002). The cascade of interactions in the
digital library interface. Information Processing and
Management, 38(3), 381
-
400. [Research Port]


Mahesh, Kavi. (n.d.). Text retrieval quality: A
primer. Oracle
Corporation white paper.
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/enterprise
-
edition/imt
-
quality
-
092464.html


Tunkelang, Daniel. (2009). Precision and recall. The Noisy
Channel. http://thenoisychannel.com/2009/03/17/precision
-

Identify
Bates’s
layers

and
-
recall/

4/1/2013

Session 9:



Metadata

Taylor & Joudrey, 89


103, 199


220

Metadata essay:
Representation /
interpretation

Explore a
metadata
schema

4/8/2013

Session 10:



Bibliographic
control,



FRBR,



RDA

Taylor & Joudrey
, Chapter 8. Skip pp. 262
-

281, start reading
again at bottom of 281.


Tillet, B. (2004). What is FRBR? A conceptual model for the
bibliographic universe.
http://www.loc.gov/cds/downloads/FRBR.PDF


RDA Introduction. For instructions on accessing RDA so th
at
you ma
y read the introduction, see this week’s

Reading
Guidelines.

FRBR


4/15/2013

Session 11:



Indexing
languages,



Thesauri

TBD


Thesaurus

4/22/2013

Session 12:



Classification,



Cataloging lab

TBD

Reflect on
readings


4/29/2013

Session 13:



Catch
-
up

day,



Exam review

NA



5/6/2013

Session 14:



Project
presentations


NA