ENG 405- REPORT WRITING

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ENG 405
-

REPORT WRITING

Term Project Topics

Below are some situations and related tasks for writing reports. Choose one and write a technical
document o
n the basis of these situations. Or decide on the topic of your term project yourself.

Project 1:
Writing a
Recommendation Report
: Studying Employee Use of Instant Messaging

Instant messaging (IM) is a popular way to exchange messages in real time. It off
ers the convenience
of telephone conversations and e
-
mail. Best of all, it allows employees to contact anyone in the
world while retaining a written copy of the conversation

without a whopping telephone bill! But
instant messaging is risky for companies. T
hey may lose trade secrets or confidential information
over insecure lines. They also may be liable if inappropriate material is exchanged. Moreover, IM
opens the door to viruses that can infect a company’s entire computer system.

Your boss just read an
ar
ticle stating that 40 percent of companies now use IM for business, and up to 90 percent

of
employees use IM
without
their managers’ knowledge or authorization. He asks you to prepare a
survey of your

25
-
member staff to learn how many are using IM. He
wants to know what type of IM
software they have downloaded, how many hours a day they spend on IM, what are the advantages
of IM, and so forth. The goal isn’t to identify those using or abusing IM. Instead, the goal is to learn
when, how, and why it is be
ing used so that appropriate policies can be designed.


Your Task:

Use an electronic database or the Web to learn more about instant messaging. Then
prepare a short employee survey. Include an appropriate introduction that explains the survey and
encourage
s a response. Should you ask for names on the survey? How can you encourage employees
to return the forms? Your instructor may wish to expand this survey into a report by having you
produce fictitious survey results, analyze the findings, draw conclusions,

and make
recommendations.

On the basis of these findings, write a Justification / Recommendation report.


Project 2:

Proposal: Solving a Workplace Problem in an Unsolicited Informal Proposal

Draw on your internship and work experience. Can you identify

a problem that could be solved with
a small to moderate financial investment? Look for issues such as missing lunch or break rooms for
staff; badly needed health initiatives such as gyms or sports club memberships; switching to high
-
gas
-
mileage, low
-
emiss
ion company vehicles; or encouraging recycling efforts.


Your Task.
Discuss with your instructor the workplace problem that you have identified. Make sure
you choose a relatively weighty problem that can nevertheless be lessened or eliminated with a
minor
expenditure. Be sure to include a cost
-
benefit analysis. Address your unsolicited letter or
memo proposal to your current or former boss and copy your instructor.


Project 3:
Unsolicited Proposal: Working From Home

You have been working as an administrativ
e/virtual assistant for your com
pany
. Every day you
commute from your home, almost two hours round trip. Most of your work is done at a computer
terminal with little or no human contact. You would prefer to eliminate the commute time, which
could be better

spent working on your programming. You believe your job would be perfect for
telecommuting. With a small investment in the proper equipment, you could do all of your work at
home, perhaps reporting to the office once a week for meetings and other activiti
es.


Your Task.
Research the costs and logistics of telecommuting, and present your proposal to your
supervisor, Sidney Greene. Because this is an unsolicited proposal, you will need to be even more
persuasive. Convince your supervisor that the company wil
l benefit from this telecommuting
arrangement.



2

Project 4 :

Unsolicited Proposal: Thwarting Dorm Room Thievery

As an enterprising college student, you recognized a problem as soon as you arrived on campus.
Dorm rooms filled

with pricey digital doodads were

very attractive to thieves. Some students move in
with more than $3,000 in gear,

including laptop computers, flat
-
screen TVs, digital cameras, MP3
players, video game consoles, PDAs, and DVD

players. You solved the problem by buying an extra
-
large steel f
ootlocker to lock away your valuables. However, shipping

the footlocker was expensive
(nearly $100), and you had to wait for it to arrive from a catalog company. Your

bright idea is to
propose to the Associated Student Organization that it allow you to off
er these steel footlockers to

students at a reduced price and with campus delivery. Your footlocker, which you found by searching
the Web, is

extremely durable and works great as a coffee table, nightstand, or card table. It comes
with a smooth interior li
ner and two compartments.


Your Task.
Working individually or with a team, imagine that you have made arrangements with a
manufacturer to act as a middleman selling footlockers on your campus at a reduced price. Consult
the Web for manufacturers and make up your own figures. However, how can y
ou get the ASO’s
permission to proceed? Give that organization a cut? Use your imagination in deciding how this plan
might work on a college campus. Then prepare an unsolicited proposal to your ASO. Outline the
problem and your goals of protecting students
’ valuables and providing convenience. Check the Web
for statistics regarding on
-
campus burglaries. Such figures should help you develop one or more
persuasive “hooks.” Then explain your proposal, project possible sales, discuss a timetable, and
describe y
our staffing.


Project 5 :

Proposal: Starting Your Own Business

You and your buddies have a terrific idea for a new business in your town. For example, you might
want to propose to Starbucks the concept of converting some of its coffee shops into Internet

cafes.
Or you might propose to the city or another organization a better Web site, which you and your team
would design and maintain. You might want to start a word processing business that offers
production, editing, and printing services. Often business
es, medical centers, attorneys, and other
professionals have overload transcribing or word processing to farm out to a service.


Your Task.
Working in teams, explore entrepreneurial ventures based on your experience and
expertise. Write a proposal to secur
e approval and funding. Your report should include a transmittal
letter, as well as a description of your proposed company, its product or service, a market analysis,
an operations and management plan, and a financial plan.


Project 6:

Formal Report: Inte
rcultural Communication

U.S. businesses are expanding into foreign markets with manufacturing plants, sales offices, and
branch offices abroad. Unfortunately, most Americans have little knowledge of or experience with
people from other cultures. To prepare

for participation in the global marketplace, you are to collect
information for a report focused on an Asian, Latin American, African, or European country where
English isn’t regularly spoken. Before selecting the country, though, consider consulting your

campus
international student program for volunteers who are willing to be interviewed. Your instructor may
make advance arrangements seeking international student volunteers.


Your Task.
In teams of
three
, collect information about your target country fro
m the library, the
Web, and other sources. If possible, invite an international student representing your target country
to be interviewed by your group. Confirm what you learn in your secondary research by talking with
your interviewee. When you complete
your research, write a report for the CEO of your company
(make up a name and company). Assume that your company plans to expand its operations abroad.
Your report should advise the company’s executives of social customs, family life, attitudes,
appropriat
e business attire, religions, economic institutions, and values in the target country.

3

Remember that your company’s interests are business oriented; don’t dwell on tourist information.
Write your report individually or in teams.


Project 7 :

Formal Report
: Consumer Product Investigation

Study a consumer product that you might consider buying. Are you, or is your family or your
business, interested in purchasing a flat
-
screen TV, DVD player, computer, digital camera, espresso
machine, car, SUV, hot tub, or
some other product?


Your Task.
Use at least
two

primary and five secondary sources in researching your topic. Your
primary research

will be in the form of interviews with individuals (owners, users, salespeople,
technicians) in a position to comment

on at
tributes of your product. Secondary research will be in
the form of print or electronic sources, such as magazine articles, owner manuals, and Web sites. Be
sure to use electronic databases and the Web to find appropriate articles. Your report should analy
ze
and discuss at least three comparable models or versions of the target product. Decide what criteria
you will use to compare the models, such as price, features, warranty, service, and so forth. The
report should include these components: letter of tran
smittal, table of contents, executive summary,
introduction (including background, purpose, scope of the study, and research methods), findings
(organized by comparison criteria), summary of findings, conclusions, recommendations, and
bibliography. Address

the report to your instructor. You may work individually, in pairs, or in teams.


Project 8:

Formal Report: All About Wik
is

W
ikis are becoming increasingly important to businesses that rely on teamwork

across time zones
and national borders. Some
educators also use wikis for collaboration in their college
-
level classes.

You are part of a group of interns from your college working at a large financial institution, Home
Bank. Your intern

team has collaborated on your finance
-
related research using a
wiki. Your informal
wiki has also been helpful

when

you worked together on a team project for college credit. Your
internship supervisor is impressed and would like you

to collect more hard data so he can pilot wikis
for wider application in collaborative
settings at the bank. Your preliminary

research suggests that
quite a few companies are using wikis, such as Best Buy’s Geek Squad, Xerox, and IBM.


In fact, IBM conducted a massive online brainstorming session that took two 72
-
hour sessions and
involved 1
00,000 employees, customers, and business p
artners in over 160 countries.

Your boss is
interested in reading about such cases to decide whether to pilot a wiki, and if so, what kind would
work for Home Bank. Your team of three will investigate.


Your Task.
Keep in mind that your boss, Irving E. Pound, will share your report with other managers
who may be computerliterate users but no tech heads. Start with the brief definition of wikis earlier
in this chapter. Expand the definition by searching th
e Web and electronic database articles. First
explain what wikis are and how they work, which resources (cost, software, hardware) are needed,
how much training is required, and so forth. Examine the use of wikis in business today. How are
large and small
companies benefiting from collaboration facilitated by wikis? If your instructor
directs, the report (or a section thereof) could discuss wikis in education and how instructors harness
this new tool. After collecting a sufficient amount of information and
data, outline and then write a
formal report with a recommendation at the end suggesting whether and how Home Bank would
benefit from investing in wiki software.






4

Project 9:

Information Report: Describing Your Job

Your instructor wants to learn about your employment.
S
elect a position you now hold or one that
you have held in the past. If you have not been employed, choose a campus, professional, or
community organization to which you belong. You may also select an
internship or volunteer activity.

Your Task.
W
rite an information report describing your employment or involvement. In the
introduction describe the company and its products or services, its ownership, and its location. In the
main part of the report, desc
ribe your position, including its tasks and the skills required to perform
these tasks. summarize by descr
ibing the experience you gained
.

Project 10:

Information Report: Searching for Career Information

Gather information about a career or position in w
hich you might be interested. learn about the
nature of the job. Discover whether certification, a license, or experience is required. one of the best
places to search is the latest
Occupational Outlook

Handbook
. Use a search engine such as Google to
locat
e the handbook, sponsored by the U.s. bureau of labor statistics. click the
OOH Search/A
-
Z Index
link; then search for a specific job title or search the alphabetic list for an occupation.

Your Task.
W
rite an information report to your instructor that desc
ribes your target career area.
discuss the nature of the work, working conditions, necessary qualifications, and the future job
outlook for the occupation. Include information about typical salary ranges and career paths. If your
instructor wants an extend
ed report, collect information about two companies where you might
apply. Investigate each company’s history, products and/or services, size, earnings, reputation, and
number of employees. describe the functions of an employee working in the

position you h
ave
investigated
. devote several sections of your report to the specific tasks, functions, duties, and
opinions of these individuals. You can make this into a recommendation report by drawing
conclusions and making recommendations. one conclusion that you
could draw relates to success in
this career area. who might be successful in this field?

Project 11:

Information Report: Exploring a Possible Place to Work

You are thinking about taking a job with a Fortune 500 company

( or any other you like)
, and you
want to learn as much as possible about the company. select a Fortune 500 company (or any other
company that interests you), and collect information about it on the web. Visit
http://www.hoovers.com
for basic facts. Then take a look at the company’s web si
te; check its
background, news releases, and annual report. learn about its major product, service, or emphasis.
Find its Fortune 500 ranking (if applicable), its current stock price (if listed), and its high and low
range for the year. look up its profit
-
to
-
earnings ratio. Track its latest marketing plan, promotion, or
product. Identify its home office, major officers, and number of employees. study the company’s
future plans.

Your Task.
In a report to your instructor, sum
marize your research findings. E
xp
lain why this
company would be a good or bad employment choice.

Project 12:

Progress Report: Making Headway Toward Your Degree

You made an agreement with your parents (or spouse, partner, relative, or friend) that you would
submit a progress report at thi
s time describing the progress you have made toward your
educational goal (employment, certificate, or degree).

Your Task
.
W
rite a progress report that fulfills your promise to describe your progress toward your
educational goal.
A
ddress your progress report to your parents, spouse, partner, relative, or friend.



5

Project 13:

Progress Report: Keeping Your Supervisor Updated

As office manager for the A
nimal Rescue Foundation

( or any other you like)

(
http://www.arf.net
), a
nonprofi
t organization that rescues and finds homes for abandoned and abused animals, you have
been asked to come up with ways to increase community awareness of your organization. For the
past month you have been meeting with business and community leaders, condu
cting web research,
and visiting with representatives from other nonprofit organizations. Your supervisor has just asked
you to prepare a written report to outline what you have accomplished so far.

Your Task.

write a progress report to your supervisor. In

your
report

(a) state whether the project is
on schedule; (b) summarize the activities you have completed thus far; (c) discuss thoroughly the
work currently in progress; and (d) describe your future activities. also let your supervisor know of
any obstac
les you have encountered and whether the project is on schedule.

Project 14:

Justification/Recommendation Report: Solving a Campus Problem

In any organization, room for improvement always exists. Your college campus is no different. You
are the member of
a student task force that has been asked to identify problems and suggest
solutions. In groups of two to
three
, investigate a problem on your campus, such as inadequate
parking, slow registration, poor class schedules, an inefficient bookstore, a weak job
-
placement
program, unrealistic degree requirements, or a lack of internship programs. within your group
develop a solution to the problem. If possible, consult the officials involved to ask for their input in
arriving at a feasible solution. do not attack
existing programs; instead, strive for constructive
discussion and harmonious improvements.

Your Task.
W
rite a justification/recommendation report
. A
ddress your report to the college
president.

Project 15:

Recommendation Report: Developing a Company E
-
Mai
l and Web
-
Use Policy

A
s a manager in a midsized financial services firm, you are aware that members of your department
frequently use e
-
mail and the Internet for private messages, shopping, games, and other personal
activities. In addition to the strain on

your company’s computer network, you worry about declining
productivity, security

problems, and liability issues. A
lthough workplace privacy is a controversial
issue for unions and employee
-
rights groups, employers have legitimate reasons for wanting to
know
what is happening on their computers. a high percentage of lawsuits involve the use and abuse of e
-
mail. You think that the executive council should establish some kind of e
-
mail and web
-
use policy.
The council is generally receptive to sound suggesti
ons, especially if they are inexpensive. You decide
to talk with other managers about the problem and write a justification/recommendation report.

In teams of two to
three
, discuss the need for an e
-
mail and web
-
use policy. Using the web, find
sample polic
ies used by other firms. look for examples of companies struggling with lawsuits over e
-
mail abuse. Find information about employers’ rights to monitor employees’ e
-
mail and web use. Use
this research to determine what your company’s e
-
mail and web
-
use pol
icy should cover. each
member of the team should present and support his or her ideas regarding what should be included
in the policy and how to best present your ideas to the executive council.

Your Task.
write a convincing justification/recommendation re
port to the executive council based on
the conclusions you draw from your research and discussion. decide whether you should be direct or
indirect.




6

Project 16:

Feasibility Report: Professional Business Organization

To fulfill a student project in your d
epartment, you have been asked to submit a report to the dean
evaluating the feasibility of starting a Phi beta lambda (
http://www.fbla
-
pbl.org/
) chapter on
campus. Find out how many business students are on your campus, the benefits Phi beta lambda
would
provide for students, how one goes about starting a chapter, and whether a faculty sponsor is
needed.
A
ssume that you conducted an informal survey of business students
.

Your Task.
write a report to the dean outlining the practicality and advisability of st
arting a Phi beta
lambda chapter on your college campus.

Project 17:

Feasibility Report: Improving
Student

Fitness

Your c
ollege management

is considering ways to promote
student

fitness and morale. select a
possible fitness program that seems reasonable
for your c
ollege
.
You may
consider a softball league,
bowling teams, a basketball league, lunchtime walks, lunchtime fitness speakers and demos, co
llege
-
sponsored health club memberships, a workout room, a fitness center, nutrition programs, and so
on.

You
r Task.
A
ssume that your supervisor has tentatively agreed to one of the programs and has asked
you to write a report investigating its feasibility
.

Project 18:

Summary: Using Blogs for Research

Your supervisor has just learned about the popularity of usi
ng blogs (or weblogs) as research tools.
This is the first he has heard of this new communication tool, and he wants to learn more. He asks
you to conduct Internet research to see what has been written on the subject.

Your Task.
Using an electronic databas
e or the web, find an article that discusses the use of blogs in
the workplace for research purposes. In a report addressed to your boss,
David Wong
, summarize the
primary ideas, conclusions, and recommendations presented in the article. be sure to
identify the
author, article name, journal, and date of publication in your summary.


PROJECT
19:

Unsolicited
Recommendation

You are to write
an unsolicited

recommendation
report
for improving the operation of some
organization with which you

have persona
l contact

perhaps the company that employed you last
summer, a

club you belong to, or your sorority or fraternity.

There are four important restrictions on the recommendation you make:

1. Your recommendation must concern a real situation in which your lett
er could

really
bring about
change. As you consider possible topics, focus on situations

that can be improved by the modest
measures that you can argue for effectively

in a relatively brief letter. It is not necessary, however,
that your letter aim to

brin
g about a complete solution. In your letter, you might aim to persuade
one

of the key people in the organization that your recommendation will serve the

organization’s
best interests.

2. Your recommendation must be unsolicited

that is, it must be addressed

to

someone who has not
asked for your advice.

3. Your recommendation must concern the way an organization operates, not just

the way one or
more individuals think or behave.


7

4. Your recommendation may
not
involve a problem that would be decided in an

essentially political
manner. Thus, you are not to write on a problem that would

be decided by elected officials (such as
members of Congress or the city council),

and you may not address a problem that would be raised
in a political campaign.

Of course, y
ou will have to write to an
actual
person, someone who, in fact,
has

the power to help make the change you recommend. You may have to investigate to

learn who
that person is. Try to learn also how that person feels about the situation

you hope to improve.
Keep
in mind that most people are inclined to reject advice

they haven’t asked for; that’s part of the
challenge of this assignment. From time to

time throughout your career, you will find that you want
to make recommendations

that your reader hasn’t reque
sted.

In the past, students have completed this assignment by writing on such matters

as the following:



A no
-
cost way that the student’s summer employer could more efficiently handle

merchandise on
the loading dock



A detailed strategy for increasing at
tendance at the meetings of a club the

student belonged to



A proposal that the Office of the Dean of Students establish a self
-
supporting

legal
-
aid service for
students

Bear in mind that one essential feature of a recommendation is that it compares

two a
lternatives:
keeping things the way they are now and changing them to the

way you think they should be. You
will have to make the change seem to be the better

alternative
from your reader’s point of view.
To
do this, you will find it helpful to

understand
why the organization does things in the present way. By
understanding

the goals of the present method, you will probably gain insight into the criteria that

your reader will apply when comparing the present method with the method you

recommend.


PROJECT
20
:


Instructions

Write a set of instructions that will enable your readers to operate some device or perform some
process used in your major. The procedure must involve at least twenty four

steps.

With the permission of your instructor, you may also choose
from topics that are not related to your
major. Such topics might include the following:



Using some special feature of a desktop publishing or spreadsheet program



Operating a piece of equipment used in your major



Changing a bicycle tire



Rigging a s
ailboat



Starting an aquarium



Some other procedure of interest to you that includes at least twenty
-
four steps

Your instructions should guide your readers through some specific process that your classmates or
Instructor
could actually perform. Do not wr
ite generic instructions for performing a general
procedure. For instance, do not write instructions for “Operating a Microscope,” but rather for
“Operating the Thompson Model 200 Microscope.”



8

Project
21
: Project Proposal

Write a proposal seeking your instructor’s approval for a project you will prepare later this term.
Notice that while working on this assignment, you will have to define the objectives of two different
communications: (1) the
proposal
you are writing now,
which is addressed to your instructor; and (2)
the
project
you are seeking approval to write, whose purpose and audience you will have to describe
to your instructor in the proposal.

When writing your proposal, you may think of your instructor as a person
who looks forward with
pleasure to working with you on your final project and wants to be sure that you choose a project
from which you can learn a great deal and on which you can do a good job. Until your instructor
learns from your proposal some details
about your proposed project, however, his or her attitude
toward it will be neutral.

While reading your proposal, your instructor will seek to answer many questions, including the
following:



What kind of communication do you wish to prepare?



Who will i
ts readers be?



What is its purpose?



What is the final result you want it to bring about?



What task will it enable its readers to perform?



How will it alter its readers’ attitudes?



Is this a kind of communication you will have to prepare at work?



Can you write the communication effectively in the time left in the term using

resources that are readily available to you?


Project
22
: Formal Report Or Proposal

Write an empirical research report, feasibility report, or proposal. Whichever form of comm
unication
you write, it must be designed to help some organization

real or imaginary

solve some problem or
achieve some goal, and you must write it in response to a request (again, real or imaginary) from the
organization you are addressing.

A real situati
on is one you have actually encountered. It might involve your employer, your major
department, or a service group to which you belong

to name just a few of the possibilities. Students
writing on real situations ha
ve prepared proj
ects with such titles as:



“Feasibility of Using a Computer Database to Catalog the Art Department’s Slide Library.” The
student wrote this feasibility report at the request of the chair of the Art Department.



“Attitudes of Participants in Merit Hotel’s R.S.V.P. Club.” The stude
nt wrote this empirical research
report at the request of the hotel, which wanted to find ways of improving a marketing program that
rewarded administrative assistants who booked their companies’ visitors at that hotel rather than at
one of the hotel’s com
petitors.


9



“Expanding the Dietetic Services at the Campus Health Center: A Proposal.” The student wrote this
proposal to the college administration at the request of the part
-
time dietitian employed by the
Health Center.

An imaginary situation is one that

you create to simulate the kinds of situations that you will find
yourself in once you begin your career. You pretend that you have begun working for an employer
who has asked you to use your specialized training to solve some problems or answer some
ques
tions that face his or her organization.

You may imagine that you are a regular employee or that you are a special consultant. Students
writing about imaginary situations have prepared formal reports with titles such as:



“Improving the Operations of the
Gift Shop at Six Flags over Georgia.” The student who wrote this
proposal had worked at this shop for a summer job; she imagined that she had been hired by the
manager to study its operation and recommend improvements.



“Performance of Three Lubricants at

Very Low Temperatures.” The student wrote this empirical
research report about an experiment he had conducted in a laboratory class. He imagined that he
worked for a company that wanted to test the lubricants for use in manufacturing equipment used at
tem
peratures below _100_F.



“Upgrading the Monitoring and Communication System in the Psychology Clinic.” The student who
wrote this report imagined that she had been asked by the Psychology Clinic to investigate the
possibility of purchasing equipment that
would improve its monitoring and communication system.
All of her information about the clinic and the equipment were real.

For this project, prepare a communication that has a cover, title page, and the other boo
k
-
like
features.
Remember that your purpose

is to help your readers make a practical decision or take a
practical action in a real or imaginary organization.


Project 23
:
Where
Is Everybody?
Proposal
To Sell
GPS
Fleet Tracking System.

As a sales manager for Air
-
Trak, one of your responsibilities
is writing sales proposals for potential
buyers of your company’s Cloudberry tracking system. Cloudberry uses the Global Positioning System
(GPS) to track the location of vehicles and other assets. For example, the dispatcher for trucking
company can simpl
y click a map display on a computer screen to find out where all the company’s
trucks are at that instant. Air
-
Trak lists the following as benefits of the system:



Making sure vehicles follow prescribed routes with minimal loitering time



“Geofencing” in whi
ch dispatcher are alerted if vehicles leave



Route optimization, in which fleet managers can analyze routes and destinations to find
the most time
-
and fuel
-
efficient path for each vehicle



Comparisons between scheduled and actual travel



Enhanced security, pr
otecting both drivers and cargos

Your Task:

Write a brief proposal to Doneta Zachs, fleet manager for Midwest Express, 338 S.W. 6th,
Des Moines, IA 50321. Introduce your company , explain the benefits of the Cloudberry system, and
propose a trial deploymen
t in which you would equip five Midwest Express trucks. For the purposes
of assignment, you don’t need to worry about the technical details of the system; focus on
promoting the benefits and asking for a decision regarding the test project. ( You can learn

more
about the Air
-
Trak and the Cloudberry system at
www.air
-
trak.com

)


10

Project

24
: Travel
Opportunities:
Report
Comparing Two Destin
ations


You are planning to take a two
-
week trip abroad sometime within the next year. Because there are a
couple of destinations that appeal to you, you are going to have to do some research before you can
make a decision.

Your Task:

Prepare a lengthy comparativ
e study of two countries that you would like to visit. Begin
by making list of important questions you will need to answer. Do you want a relaxing vacation or
educational experience? What types of services will you require? What will your transportation
n
eeds be? Where will you have the least difficulty with the language? Using resources in your library,
the Internet, and perhaps travel agencies, analyze the suitability of these two destinations with
respect to your own travel criteria. At the end of the r
eport, recommend the better country to visit.

Project

25
: Research
Report Assisting A Client In A Career Choice.


You are employed by open Options, a career counseling firm, where your main function is to help
clients make

career choices. Today a client c
ame to your office and asked for help deciding between
two careers


that you had been interested in.

Your Task
: Do some research on the two careers and then prepare a short report that your client can
study. Your report should compare at

least

five major
areas, such as salary, working conditions, and
education required. Interview the client to understand her or his personal preferences regarding
each of five areas. For example, what is the minimum salary the client will accept? By comparing the
client’s pr
eferences with the research material you collect, such as salary data, you will have a basis
for concluding which of the two careers is best. The report should end with a recommendation. (
Note: see the website for career
-
related information:
www.bls.gov/coo
)

Project

26: A Ready
-
Made Business: Finding The Right Franchise Opportunity

After 15 years in the corporate world, you are ready to strike out on your own. Rather than building a
business from the ground up, however, you think that buying a franchise is a better idea.
Some of the
most lucrative franchise opportunities, such as maj
or fast
-
food chains, require significant start
-
up
costs


some more than half
-
million dollars. Fortunately, you have met several potential investors
who seem willing to help you get started in exchange for a share of ownership. You can raise from
$350000 t
o $600.000, depending on how much ownership share you want to concede to the
investors.

Your Task:

to convene a formal meeting with the investor group, you need to first draft a report
outlining the types of franchise opportunities you’d like to pursue. Wr
ite a brief report identifying
five franchising that you would like to explore further. For each possibility , identify the nature of the
business, the financial requirements, the level of support the company provides, and a brief
statement of why you coul
d run such a business successfully. Be sure to review the information you
find about each franchise company to make sure you can qualify for it.

For quick introduction to franchising, see How Stuff Works (

www.howstuffworks.com/franchising
).
You can learn more about the business of franchising at
www.franchising.com

and search for specific
franchise opportunities at FranCorp Connect (
www.francorpconnect.com

). In addition, many
companies offer additional information related to franchising
opportunities

on their websites
.

REFERENCES



Anderson, P.V. (2011).
Technical Communication: A reader
-
centered approach
. 7th ed.
p.695 (Project 19
-
22)



Bovee C.L. & J.V. Thill (2008).
Business Communication Today
. 9th ed. USA: Pearson.
(project 23
-
26)



Guffey M.E. & D. Loewy (2010).
Essentials of Business Communication
. 8th Ed. Mason, USA: South
-
Western
Cengage

Learning.

Chapter 9 &10 ( Project 1
-
18)