CAC Recommendations for Franciscan - Siena

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Core Advisory Committee
Recommendations

Regarding the Franciscan Concern Courses for the Core Curriculum

Fall 2008


Members of the committee
making

the recommendations:
Josh Diamond (Science), Tom Kopp
(
Business
), Fareed Munir (Liberal Arts), Dick Ognibene (At
-
large), Tom Swan (Chair);
ex officio
: Ralph
Blasting

(BOI)
, John Burkey

(C
ore Review Committee)
, Dennis Tamburello, OFM
.


Having closely examined the Franciscan component of the proposed Core curriculum, t
h
e C
ore
Advisory Committee
views the following recommendations of the Core Review Committee as essential
for making the recommended guidelines workable
. Thus, they should be considered as an integral part
of the CAC’s present recommendations to the BOI.




Re
commendation 2
: Four courses, one in each of the Franciscan Concern categories
.


a)

Heritage: Traditions and Their Texts

b)

Diversity: American & Global Pluralism

c)

Social Justice: Principles and Practice

d)

Nature: Scientific & Normative Approaches to the Natural
World




Recommendation 10
:

Where possible, departments should consider relaxing prerequisites for
Franciscan Concern courses or changing prerequisites from “courses x and y” to “juniors or
seniors
.




Recommendation 13
: A maximum of two Franciscan Concern cou
rses may be taken from the
same department
.



Recommendation 14
: Departments will decide whether up to one Core course will count
toward the major, as is the current practice
.



Proposi
ng Franciscan Concern Courses for

the Core

Curriculum


The Franciscan
Concern component of the Core ensures exposur
e to themes of special importance

to
the
Franciscan Tradition that can be explored from multiple perspectives. Faculty members from any of
the three schools in the College may propose courses for any of the fou
r Franciscan Concern areas.
All proposals for courses in the Franciscan areas
must

address the following question
s

in proposals:


1.

What is the course number, name of the course, and the Franciscan Concern?


2.

How
does

the course meet the Core Purpose and Obj
ectives?


3.

In general terms, h
ow
does

the course
reflect

the
Franciscan Concern?


4.

H
ow will the syllabus

specifically

identify the connection between the content of the course and
the Franciscan Concern? (Please include a copy of the syllabus that includes an explanation of
the connection that will be used
every time the course is taught.
)


5.

How will
all
instructors of t
he course ensure that students
understand

the connection of the
course content with the Franciscan Concern?
(Possibiliti
es
include

but are not limited to

one or
more of the following:

class discu
ssions,
readings, class activities
,
participation

in an even
t,
class t
rip, assignment, and the like.
The proposer may use any means they deem appropriate
and relevant to the course content and Franciscan Concern
category
.)


6.

How will the course satisfy the writing i
nstruction component mandated for

all
Core courses?

(Strong proposals will include examples of writing assignments.)




P
roposing
Courses for

Heritage: Traditions and Their Texts


C
ore Purpose and Objectives

The Core curriculum’s distinctive contribution to the Siena learning community is to foster the
intellectual development of all students through exposure to the liberal arts and sciences. To achieve
this end, the Core’s central objectives are to promote:




dialogue with traditional and contemporary figures who have confronted fundamental questions
ab
out the universe and the place of human beings in it;




reflection on the values central to Siena’s Franciscan and Catholic heritage;




civic responsibility for life
-
long participation in a diverse, democratic society, as well as diverse
global communities;




understanding of scientific and quantitative methods of analysis;




habits of critical and creative thinking, of effective written and oral communication, and of
aesthetic sensibilities.



Heritage: Traditions and Their Texts

As a tradition born in the
13th Century, the Franciscan Tradition is embedded within Western heritage,
and as a living tradition nearly 800 years old, the Franciscan Tradition is constitutive of subsequent
W
estern heritage.


The "Heritage
" rubric embraces this broad sense of traditi
on.


Courses are welcome
that acquaint students with one or more of the major intellectual, cultural,

or religious traditions in this
history

and the texts, figures, events, or movements associated with them.


Courses in this category
elucidate how these t
raditions address fundamental questions of humanistic or religious concern.



Proposing Franciscan Concern Courses for the Core Curriculum


Please address the following questions in proposals


1.

What is the course number, name of the course, and the Francisc
an Concern?


2.

How does the course meet the Core Purpose and Objectives?


3.

In general terms, h
ow does the course
reflect

the
Franciscan Concern?


4.

How will the syllabus specifically identify the connection between the content of the course and
the Franciscan
Concern? (Please include a copy of the syllabus that includes an explanation of
the connection that will be used every time the course is taught.)


5.

How will
all
instructors of the course ensure that students
understand

the connection of the
course content

with the Franciscan Concern?
(Possibilities include

but are not limited to

one or
more of the following:

class discu
ssions, readings, class activities
, participation in an event,
class t
rip, assignment, and the like.
The proposer may use any means they d
eem appropriate
and relevant to the course content and Franciscan Concern
category.)


6.

How will the course satisfy the writing i
nstruction component mandated for

all
Core courses?
(Strong proposals will include examples of writing assignments.)





Proposi
ng Courses for

Diversity: American & Global Pluralism


Core Purpose and Objectives

The Core curriculum’s distinctive contribution to the Siena learning community is to foster the
intellectual development of all students through exposure to the liberal art
s and sciences. To achieve
this end, the Core’s central objectives are to promote:




dialogue with traditional and contemporary figures who have confronted fundamental questions
about the universe and the place of human beings in it;




reflection on the
values central to Siena’s Franciscan and Catholic heritage;




civic responsibility for life
-
long participation in a diverse, democratic society, as well as diverse
global communities;




understanding of scientific and quantitative methods of analysis;




habits of critical and creative thinking, of effective written and oral communication, and of
aesthetic sensibilities.



Diversity: American & Global Pluralism

The Franciscan concern for diversity flows from its affirmation of each individual as worthy o
f respect
and compassion. Individuality implies plurality of perspective, both on the level of differences among
persons and on the level of differences among peoples. Appreciating diversity requires that students
have the opportunity to see things from pe
rspectives they do not normally occupy
. This includes the
examination of diverse intellectual perspectives.

Some meanings of diversity are:



Diversity of culture, religion, gender, race, ethnicity, economic or social cla
ss, or of political
principles

withi
n
America.



Diversity that exceeds American culture; diversity that exceeds Western or European culture.

The “Diversity” rubric welcomes courses that offer students opportunity for shifting perspective to
“other” persons, peoples, ideas, in either a domes
tic or global context.




Proposing Franciscan Concern Courses for the Core Curriculum

Please address the following questions in proposals


1.

What is the course number, name of the course, and the Franciscan Concern?


2.

How does the course meet the Core
Purpose and Objectives?


3.

In general terms, h
ow does the course
reflect

the
Franciscan Concern?


4.

How will the syllabus specifically identify the connection between the content of the course and
the Franciscan Concern? (Please include a copy of the syllabus

that includes an explanation of
the connection that will be used every time the course is taught.)


5.

How will
all
instructors of the course ensure that students
understand

the connection of the
course content with the Franciscan Concern?
(Possibilities in
clude

but are not limited to

one or
more of the following:

class discu
ssions, readings, class activities
, participation in an event,
class t
rip, assignment, and the like.
The proposer may use any means they deem appropriate
and relevant to the course conte
nt and Franciscan Concern
category.)


6.

How will the course satisfy the writing i
nstruction component mandated for

all
Core courses?
(Strong proposals will include examples of writing assignments.)

Proposing Courses for

Social Justice: Principles and Pract
ice


Core Purpose and Objectives

The Core curriculum’s distinctive contribution to the Siena learning community is to foster the
intellectual development of all students through exposure to the liberal arts and sciences. To achieve
this end, the Core’s
central objectives are to promote:




dialogue with traditional and contemporary figures who have confronted fundamental questions
about the universe and the place of human beings in it;




reflection on the values central to Siena’s Franciscan and Catholic he
ritage;




civic responsibility for life
-
long participation in a diverse, democratic society, as well as diverse
global communities;




understanding of scientific and quantitative methods of analysis;




habits of critical and creative thinking, of effective wr
itten and oral communication, and of
aesthetic sensibilities.



Social Justice: Principles and Practice

The Franciscan Tradition joins with other traditions and movements in placing a premium on social
justice. Social justice permeates all levels of human

affairs and admits investigation from a variety of
perspectives. Broadly speaking, social justice c
oncerns (a)

the practical organization of human affairs
allowing f
or maximal human flourishing, (b)

the values and principles guiding or that might guide th
e
o
rganization of human affairs, (c)

the extent to which such values or principles are practically realized
or under
-
realized. The “Social Justice” rubric welcomes courses that study the theory or practice of
justice from social, moral, political, religiou
s, economic, environmental, aesthetic, or technological
points of view.



Proposing Franciscan Concern Courses for the Core Curriculum

Please address the following questions in proposals


1.

What is the course number, name of the course, and the Franciscan
Concern?


2.

How does the course meet the Core Purpose and Objectives?


3.

In general terms, h
ow does the course
reflect

the
Franciscan Concern?


4.

How will the syllabus specifically identify the connection between the content of the course and
the Franciscan Conc
ern? (Please include a copy of the syllabus that includes an explanation of
the connection that will be used every time the course is taught.)


5.

How will
all
instructors of the course ensure that students
understand

the connection of the
course content wit
h the Franciscan Concern?
(Possibilities include

but are not limited to

one or
more of the following:

class discu
ssions, readings, class activities
, participation in an event,
class t
rip, assignment, and the like.
The proposer may use any means they deem
appropriate
and relevant to the course content and Franciscan Concern
category.)


6.

How will the course satisfy the writing i
nstruction component mandated for

all
Core courses?
(Strong proposals will include examples of writing assignments.)




Proposing Courses for

Nature: Scientific & Normative Approaches to the Natural World


Core Purpose and Objectives

The Core curriculum’s distinctive contribution to the Siena learning community is to foster the
intellectual development of all students
through exposure to the liberal arts and sciences. To achieve
this end, the Core’s central objectives are to promote:




dialogue with traditional and contemporary figures who have confronted fundamental questions
about the universe and the place of human b
eings in it;




reflection on the values central to Siena’s Franciscan and Catholic heritage;




civic responsibility for life
-
long participation in a diverse, democratic society, as well as diverse
global communities;




understanding of scientific and quantita
tive methods of analysis;




habits of critical and creative thinking, of effective written and oral communication, and of
aesthetic sensibilities.



Nature
: Scientific & Normative Approaches to
the Natural World


The Franciscan Tradition affirms the
goodness of nature. As an intellectual tradition it supports the
scientific investigation of nature, and as a spiritual tradition it cultivates deepened appreciation for the
entirety of the created world

and heightened commitment to the effective stewardsh
ip of the Earth and
all living things
. The “Natural World” rubric welcomes courses
which both investigate the natural world
from a scientific perspective and also examine the impact and consequences of human involvement in
natural systems
.



Proposing
Franciscan Concern Courses for the Core Curriculum

Please address the following questions in proposals


1.

What is the course number, name of the course, and the Franciscan Concern?


2.

How does the course meet the Core Purpose and Objectives?


3.

In general terms,

h
ow does the course
reflect

the
Franciscan Concern?


4.

How will the syllabus specifically identify the connection between the content of the course and
the Franciscan Concern? (Please include a copy of the syllabus that includes an explanation of
the conne
ction that will be used every time the course is taught.)


5.

How will
all
instructors of the course ensure that students
understand

the connection of the
course content with the Franciscan Concern?
(Possibilities include

but are not limited to

one or
more o
f the following:

class discu
ssions, readings, class activities
, participation in an event,
class t
rip, assignment, and the like.
The proposer may use any means they deem appropriate
and relevant to the course content and Franciscan Concern
category.)


6.

How
will the course satisfy the writing i
nstruction component mandated for

all
Core courses?
(Strong proposals will include examples of writing assignments.)






Some Suggestions for Course that Might be Proposed for the Core Franciscan Courses


Below are
some suggestion
s
from representatives on the CAC

of
courses
from the current catalog
that
might

fit or be easily adapted to meet the guidelines for one of the four Franciscan Concern categories.
This list
is
not
by any means comprehensive or exclusive, no
r
does
it

guarantee

the
se

courses

actually
will be proposed for
the
Core or
approved by the CAC and BOI for the Franciscan Concern areas.

Course titles in
bold

are not in

the current Core.

Our
expectation is

that new courses
appropriate for
Franciscan Co
ncern categories

also will be developed
.



Heritage: Traditions and Their Texts


CREA231 Art to the 15th Century

CREA232 Art from the 15th Century

CREA242 Music from the 17th Century

CREA251 Theatre to the Restoration

CREA252 Theatre from
the Restoration

CREA327 Medieval Art

CREA328 Renaissance Art


CLSS200/HIST205 Greek Civilization

CLSS205/HIST206 Roman Civilization

CLSS210 Women in Antiquity

CLSS240 Greek Archeology and Art

CLSS245 Roman Archeology and Art

CLSS260 Gods and Goddesses

CLSS320 Greek Tragedy

CLSS330 Ancient Epic


ECON330 History of Economic Doctrines


EDUC225 Historical and Sociological Foundations
of Western Education


ENGL051
/CLSS220

Greek Literature in Translation

ENGL055
/CLSS225

Latin Literature in Translation

ENGL200/205 Survey of English Literature

ENGL310 Early Modern Literature

ENGL315 Literature of the Enlightenment


FREN026 French Literature in Translation


GERM025 Twentieth Century Germanic Literature in
Translation

HIST225 Medieval Europe

HIST230 The
Renaissance and Reformation

HIST451/453 U.S. Social and Cultural History


MRST100 Renaissance and Renewal: Introduction
to Medieval and Renaissance Studies


PHIL202 Philosophy and Reality

PHIL260 Philosophy of Religion

PHIL290 Greek and Roman Philosophy

PHIL294 Early Modern Philosophy

PHIL320 Philosophy of Nature

PHIL342 Medieval Philosophy

PHIL346 Late Modern Philosophy

PHIL348 Existentialism

PHIL350 Philosophical Influences on Theology

PHIL450 Great Figures in Philosophy


POSC230 Classical and Medieval
Political Theory


RELG240 Introduction to Christian Theology

RELG205 Judaism

RELG260 Religion and Moral Decision

RELG301 The Reformation of Christendom

RELG310 The American Evangelical Tradition

RELG315 American Catholicism

RELG320 Biblical Archeology

RELG324 Introduction to the
Old

Testament

RELG330 Jesus, the Gospels, and Christian Origins

RELG335 Paul and the Rise of the Christian Church

RELG355 The Catholic Tradition

RELG401 The Franciscan Tradition

RELG440 The Protestant Tradition



















Diversity: American & Global Pluralism


ATDV210/WSTU100 Perspectives on Women’s
and Multicultural Studies

ATDV779 Topics in Intercultural Understanding


CREA357 Music Ritual and Creative Arts in Non
-
Western Culture


EDUC220 Democracy and
Pluralism in

American
Education


ENGL210 Women in Literature

ENGL215 Sexuality in Literature

ENGL370 African American Literature

ENGL372 Native American Literature

ENGL374 Asian American Literature

ENGL376 Latino/a Literature

ENGL490
Topics: Gay and Lesbian Literature



HIST330 The Middle East: Foundations of the Modern
Experience

HIST335 History of Mexico

HIST375 Women in European History

HIST461 African
-
American History


PHIL285 Philosophy and the Feminine


POSC150 World Politics

POSC218 Women and Politics

POSC343 European Politics

POSC345 Chinese Government and Politics

POSC346 Middle East Politics

POSC347 Politics and Society in the Americas


PSYC120 Psychology of Women

PSYC285 Topics: Cross
-
c
ultural P
sychology

PSYC255 Sexual
Behavior


RELG210 Islam

RELG215 Eastern Christianity

RELG250 Women and Religion

RELG280 World Religions

RELG305 Religion in America

RELG325 Islamic Scripture: Qur’an

RELG357 Global Catholicism

RELG380 The Religions of Native Peoples

RELG385 Buddhist
Traditions

RELG390 Religion and Globalization


SOCI140 Cultural Anthropology

SOCI150 American Indians

SOCI180 Peoples of Africa

SOCI210 Race and Ethnic Relations

SOCI230 Sociology of Sex and Gender


SPAN027 Women Writers from Latin American:
Literature in

Translation


ECON350 Comparative Economics


ENVA220
/ENGL220

Literature and the
Environment

ENVA230
/RELG270

Religion and the Environment


GLST100 Introduction

to Globalization Studies

GLST300 Topics in Globalization Studies


BUDV Global Business
Environment


MKMG334
International Marketing



could include
social impacts of such behavior.

M
KMG337 Managing D
iversity in Organizations




might be able to include appropriate issues.
























Social Justice: Principles and Practice


INSA400 Seminar in Franciscan Service and
Advocacy


ENGL365 Atomic Literature

ENGL368 Literature of the War in Vietnam

ENGL490 The Literature of War and Peace


HIST325 United States Women’s History

HIST411 Slavery in Historical Perspective

HIST457 History of American Immigration


PCST101 Introduction to Peace Studies

PCST250 Empowerment, Social Action, and
Personal Transformation


PHIL210 Ethics

PHIL230 The Democratic Idea

PHIL270 Philosophy of Law


POSC257 Terrorism: Causes and Cures

POSC
355 Global
Environmental Dilemmas

POSC
254 Ch
ildren in War and Work

POSC362 Refugee and Migration Studies

POSC370/372 Civil Liberties


RELG265 Introduction to Catholic Social Teaching

RELG360 Morals and Medicine

RELG365 Religion, Values, and Business

RELG370 Religion, Morality, Politics

RELG445 Liberation Theology


SOCI120 Current Social Problems

SOCI160 Environment and Society

SOCI220 Collective and Social Movements

SOCI
350

Wealth and Power in Contemporary
Societ
y

SOCI300 Political Sociology

SOCI350 Wealth and Power in Contemporary
Society


SWRK
440

Social Welfa
re Policy and Services

SCDV002 Women in Science: Struggles and
Strategies


ECON220 Labor Economics

ECON360 Economic Development


MKMG338 Labor Relations


BUDV450 Strategic Management



could have a
few cases introduced to examine the impact of
decisions on poor, disenfranchised, etc.


ACCT
420 Not
-
For
-
Profit Accounting



since it
examines unique reporting requirements for
welfare agencies, churches, etc.

ACCT
340 Tax
ation



could include some aspects of
incidence and the impact on various groups of
this significant redistribution policy.


ECON
490 S
eminar



when

Scott does poverty
studies, etc.


FINC413

International Finance



might focus on
globalism and
the impact of system and policies
on poor and rich.

FINC432

Portfolio Management



could include
aspects of social justice in investment decisions
and the costs and benefits of socially motivated
investment.


M
K
M
G
327

Government and Business



could
cover r
egulation for justice, etc.


QBUS200 Business Statistics


could have a
component on

social welfare data, poverty,
wealth, etc as they study statistics to build a
vision of world as it is and what needs to be
addressed.























Nature
: Scientific & Normative Approaches
to the Natural World



BIOL010 Topics in Environmental/Population Biology

BIOL225/ ENVA250 Ecology

BIOL465/ EVVA450 Conservation Biology


CHEM
010 Chemistry in the News

CHEM230/ ENVA290 Environmental
Chemistry


ENVA
015 Principles of Ecology

ENVA
025 Concepts of Environmental Chemistry

ENVA
020 Biological Diversity

ENVA
050

Earth Science

ENVA
055 Energy and Environment

ENVA
100
Environmental Science



PHYS
010

Atmosphere and Oceans


Course that could be devel
oped

or components that
could be added to existing courses
:




Biotechnology (including uses in agriculture and
industry)
--

societal benefits and concerns.




Advances in genetics (e.g. genome
characterization) and medical applications
--

socie
tal benefits
and concerns.



Morals and medicine.


There is a

Religious
Studies course (RELG
360) with this title, but


such a course
--
with a larger scientific
component
--
could likely also be a Franciscan

Concer
n


Natural World Perspectives C
ore
co
urse.




Chemistry as a f
oundation for industry and
agriculture
--

socie
tal benefits and concerns.



Chemical and biological weapons, arms control
efforts and agreements for ch
emical and
biological weapons



Computers and the mechanisms for management
and control of information


s
oci
etal benefits and
concerns.




Natural resources


production, depletion, reuse.


Availability and distribution of resources

present
and future concerns
.



Population


world population trends and
implications,
control efforts and concerns.





Use of statistica
l and modeling techniques on
societal problems with significant quantitative
content, for example, epidemiology, development
and monitoring of pharmaceuticals, natural
resour
ces supplies and distribution.




Nuclear science and technology: nuclear
weapons
and arms control, nuclear fission
power

including reactor safety and radioactive
waste disposal, alternative nuclear power
technologies including nuclear fusion.


Societal
concerns, analysis and perception of risk.



Astronomy and cosmology

including effects

of
the development of scientific cosmology on
human appreciation of the

cosmos and our place
in it.





The scientific community and its interactions with
society

primarily based on case studies: for
example, the role of government and industry in
supportin
g and disseminating scientific research;
ethical conflicts in scientific research and societal
applications.



Depending on the degree of
quantitative

analysis
or

use of scientific literature
, the following might be appropriate for
either th
e Social Justice

Perspective

or Natural World
Perspective
.


ENVA300/ECON350 Environmental Economics

ENVA120 Environmental Ethics

ENVA310
/POSC360

Environmental Politics

ENVA430/ATDV100 The Adirondack Environment


PHIL310 Genetic Explosion and Its

Moral
Implications