D2.33 - Case study: RTE

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D2.33 RTE Case Study:
NOC & Management organisation

Page
1


D2.33
-

Case study:
RTE

NOC & Management organisation

from
CIGRE presentation on 2012 August

V02



2012
Oct



1

Introduction

The working group D2.26 (
Telecommunication Service Provisioning and delivery in the
Electrical power Utility
) issued on April 2011
the TB 461 in which was highlighted the schema
of Telecom Service Provision Models in the EPU.


Figure 1


:

Telecom Service Provision Models in the EPU


As writt
en in chapter 8.4.1 of this TB
the most basic
,

and historically the most employed form
of telec
om service provision in the EPU

is model A:
thus,
for
RTE
Operations

network
,
it
means
telecom asset ownership, in
-
house skills for running the network, etc. whereas
Corporate entities provisions telecom ser
vices separately

(see

TB 461 for all models and
main reasons of adopting each and the corresponding issues).

RTE is one of those EPU using this model A
,

managing and maintaining two
physically
separate
d

telecommunication networks

using two different proces
ses
.

This section provides some in
-
sight into the way RTE has to manage day by day these two
different networks,
starting with

a short description of RTE organisation that will help to
understand
both

network
s

architecture.


Corporate
Activities
Operations
EPU
Corporate
Activities
Operations
EPU
Telecom
Services
Telecom
Corporate
Activities
Operations
Power Corporation
Telecom
Service
Provider
Corporate
Activities
Operations
EPU
Telecom
Service
Contractor
A
C
B
D
EPU
Corporate
Activities
Operations
EPU
Telecom
Service
Provider
E
Telecom
Assets
Corporate
Activities
Operations
EPU
Corporate
Activities
Operations
EPU
Telecom
Services
Telecom
Telecom
Corporate
Activities
Operations
Operations
Power Corporation
Telecom
Service
Provider
Corporate
Activities
Operations
Operations
EPU
Telecom
Service
Contractor
Telecom
Service
Contractor
A
C
B
D
EPU
Corporate
Activities
Operations
EPU
Telecom
Service
Provider
E
Telecom
Assets
D2.33 RTE Case Study:
NOC & Management organisation

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2


2

About RTE

Up to now, RTE organi
sation is based on two linked business lines
having

two
complementary skills:



Power system and flow management
B
usiness
U
nits
:

Thi
s business unit is on charge of the
main
following roles



Supply


Demand balance



Electricity Network access



Power System
security



Network development projects management

They are shared between the National Control Centre (
a.k.a
CNES
1



National Dispatching
)
and the seven Regional Power System Units

(
seven
Regional
Control Centres

and
Regional
Network Development

centres
)
.

E
ach Control Centre (National and Regional) is built on a Main and a Backup site.


Figure 2

:
The seven R
egional Power Units

C
entres over France




Electricity Transmission and network management
BU
:

The main roles ensured by this business unit are



Electricity
network maintenance



Infrastructure operations



Network development engineering

They are shared between the National Network Expertise Centre (CNER
2
)

and the seven
Regional Transmission Units

(seven Network Operation & Maintenance
centres
with Network
Develo
pment Engineering centres)
.




1

Centre National d’Exploitation du Système électrique

2

Centre National d’Expertise du Réseau électrique

D2.33 RTE Case Study:
NOC & Management organisation

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3




Figure 3

:
The seven Electricity Transmission units centres over France


Information are exchanged between all sites of these two different BUs and several other
entities using on one hand the Corporate Telecommunication Network and
on the other hand
the Operation Telecommunication Network.

As written above, t
hese networks are physically separated.


3

Corporate

Telecommunication network

The corporate telecommunication network is
a
n

IP
-
VPN
Network Operator
(MPLS based)
used for
corporate

information transmission

between
200 RTE sites (Control Centres,
Transport Units Head Offices
,
tertiary sites,
R&D,
Antenne & Electricity Line Team)
and

IT
outsourcers on charge of its maintenance.

3.1

Corporate

Telecommunication network architecture

The arch
itecture is given in the following
figure:

D2.33 RTE Case Study:
NOC & Management organisation

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4



Figure 4

:
Corporate
Network

Architecture

D2.33 RTE Case Study:
NOC & Management organisation

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5



This architecture can be described saying:



There are t
wo Data Center
s, a Main and a Backup. Data servers and offices applic
ations
are located in the Main Data Center
. Data synchronism is ensured using 2
dedicat
ed
optical fibbers connected between these both sites

(Gb link)
.
They are leased lines and
managed by an outsourced operator
.

In the near future, this Main/Backup architecture will be replaced by an Active/Active
architecture, based on an automatic data sy
nchronisation. One of the 2 dedicated optical
fibbers mentioned just above will be private link.



Each Control Centre has a Main and a Backup site (except District ones)
.



Access routers (2 per sites) are supervised by RTE and IT outsourcer (links breaks)
w
hereas all the network is under Network Operator responsibility.



Data rate scale is from
2x
2Mb
it/s

(Antenne sites) up to
2x
200Mb
it/s

for Data Center
s in
load balancing mode
.



The Operation telecommunication network has entering points in Control Centres

and in
the seven Control
-
Command expertise groups
, but as written previously,
it
is totally
independent.


3.2

Incident management

The three

following
entities are implicated in the incident management: RTE, IT Outsourcer
and Network Operator.

The process is g
iven in the following figure:

D2.33 RTE Case Study:
NOC & Management organisation

Page
6





Figure 5

:
Corporate Network incident management process
D2.33 RTE Case Study:
NOC & Management organisation

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7


The different steps are:

1

IT Outsourcer has the responsibility to open the incident ticket and…

2

…to lunch a call to
the Network Operator, to warn RTE IT Operation leader (2

a
) …and RTE IT Site leader depending on inc
ident impact (2 b
)

3

Network Operator creates another incident ticket and sends back ticket
number to IT Outsourcer

4

Network Operator analyses and solves the i
ncident …

5

…then calls the IT outsourcer for RTE ticket closure

6

IT Outsourcer files
-
up RTE Database…

7

…and warns RTE IS Operation Leader ; if needed, depending on incident
impact, RTE Users are informed by Operation Services of the incident status
(7 a).


Co
rporate Telecommunication network would not be so useful without any Operat
ion
information to transmit. The
s
e

information
are

transmitted

from the
Operation
T
elecommunication network which is visible in
Figure 4

in all the Control Centres (National,
Regional and District).

The following chapter gives a presentation of this network, its architecture, the way it is
managed
,

and by which RTE entity.


4

Operation Telecom
munication

network

The origin of this telecommunication network is the legal obligation imposed in 1927 on
French energy DSO and TSO to set
-
up and to maintain at their expense all operation
telephone network
s

to ensure security power exchanges.

Unlike

the
Corporate Network, the Operation Telecommunication network is built on one
hand on the RTE in
-
house optical infrastructure for the
high

level

telecontrol

(
80 sites
from
National Control Centre down to District Control Centres)
, and on
the other hand
on RTE

optical regional networks,
IP
-
VPN
leased lines,
or power line technology

for low level
telecontrol (
2400 sites
from District Control Centres down to Substations)
.

The follo
wing figure pictures out the 16500 km

of the RTE optical infrastructure on 2011
Sep
tember:

D2.33 RTE Case Study:
NOC & Management organisation

Page
8



Figure 6

: RTE Optical infrastructure on 2011 September

These sub
-
networks use SDH or WDM technology for information transmission.


4.1

Operation Telecommunication N
etwork
logical
architecture

T
he
logical
architecture is
based on

two
areas
:








D2.33 RTE Case Study:
NOC & Management organisation

Page
9




The high level telecontrol:

built on
SDH/WDM
private
optical Network
3
,
having a

STM16 backbone (from
National Control Centre to Regional
Control Centres) and STM4 regional
rings (from Regional Control Centres to
District Control Centres

and 400

kV
Substati
ons
)



畳u搠
t漠 g畡r慮ty t桥
獥捵rity of
t桥
灯w敲e獹獴敭e數捨cng敳

i湣n畤i湧 p散erity q敬数桯湹 py獴敭

慮搠㐰〠ks t敬数rot散ti潮
.




The low level telecontrol:

built on IP
-
VPN leased lines, power lines
technology
, private airwave systems

or
STM1 SDH regional optical sub
-
networks, from District Control Centres
down to Substations

(225

kV
/90

kV
/63

kV
)



畳u搠
t漠桯l搠è畡lity 捨cll敮g敳ef潲
t敬散e湴n潬I ㈲R


t敬数r潴散ti潮I
p散erity q敬数桯湹 py獴敭e 扥tw敥n
t桯獥⁳st敳
.


q桥 f潬l潷i湧 fig畲u giv敳e 愠 灲敳敮瑡éi潮 潦 t桥 gl潢慬
l潧i捡c
慲捨at散t畲u:
††††††††††††††††††††
†††

3

a.k.a ROSE for Réseau Optique de Sécurité

D2.33 RTE Case Study:
NOC & Management organisation

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10




Figure 7

: Operation network logical architecture

D2.33 RTE Case Study:
NOC & Management organisation

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11


T
he infrastructure of Wind Generation System (IPES) is based in region 7 (South West),
whereas
the

other 6 region
s

are able to visualize all related information
.

All National and Regional Control Centres have a Main and a Backup site.

The low level tele
cont
rol is secured thanks to 2

paths using 2 different kinds of links
.
It is

regionally
managed by RTE thanks to the seven Regional Administration Centres (
CAR
-

helped by

the
national IS entity expertise)
.

The high level tetecontrol (STM16



2.5Gbit/s

for the

backbone and STM4



600Mbit/s

for
Regional Rings) is secured thanks to the Sub Network Connection Protection (SNCP

using
optical fibbers
).

The national NOC for AEM is the CASTEN
4
. This entity has permanently the
backbone and all regional rings status visi
bility, and all current or near future planned
operations.


The next
paragraph

gives a short presentation of all CASTEN responsibilities and the way it
deals with
its
external interfaces.


4.2

NOC (
a.k.a
CASTEN) activities

The high level Operation telecommunic
ation network AEM is centralized in the CASTEN
entity. There is a site redundancy to
enable

this function during crisis situation.

The following figure gives a presentation of its organisation and roles
:



Figure 8

: CASTEN organisation




4

Centre d’Administration et de Supervision des Télécommunications

d’Exploitation Nationale

D2.33 RTE Case Study:
NOC & Management organisation

Page
12


The CASTEN is accountable
of the smooth running of this high level Operation
telecommunication network. Thanks to

a set of tools,
it

has permanently the backbone and
all regional rings status visibility, and

a view of

all current or near future planned operations.

CASTEN operates
the network during daytime 7/7, with on
-
call alert after business hours.
It
is an operating team for administrating and supervising the network (ticket management,
analysis and solving). It works jointly with the
RTE
regional local teams for planning and
l
eading all
level 1 to 3
maintenance works

according to their mission
, and is helped by
national IS entity

(DSIT)

and equipment providers

for level 4 and 5 maintenance works.


In terms of Maintenance, the main role of the CASTEN is the following.



Preventive

maintenance :

-

On servers, storage of OS + application software + Configuration Data + Data
before any upgrade or major change
of the configuration
; archive in an external
hard disk after
, except data
,

-

On servers,
commutation tests between Main and Secondary, consistency
data validation, logs purge,
routers configuration validation,

-

C
hange of filters on ventilator fans for
telecom

equipments (once a year)

-

Anti
-
virus software application sent by DSIT a
t a
nytime

i
f necessary




Network’s configuration data
maintenance

:

-

Telecommunications maps are updated in schema library after any change of
the network architecture

-

Traffic matrix are updated on real time,

-

IS tools are updated after
any

changes on architecture or services migration to
optical network




Maintenance spare availability:

Spare management is ensured by one RTE
employee

per region who ha
s

the
responsibility to ensure it is ready
to be implemented
.
The team which uses it
has to
make it

repaired
if necessary.


5

Conclusion

To satisfy

its needs in telecommunications, RTE uses on one hand private links internally
operated (Operation network based on optical fibbers, airwave systems, power lines on
energy cables, etc.) and on the other

hand outsourced services by telecommunication
operators

(Corporate network, leased lines, mobile and radio phones, etc.).

This

is in the context where telecom policies and new needs
that
respond

to RTE
requirements

must be analysed and clarif
ied for the
next 15 years

since having dedicated
means for each application must be avoided without a global view, without optimis
ation and
mutualisation. That is to say that
RTE optical fibbers utilisation step by step would generate
telecom resources and costs
waste
.



Operation
Telecom policies are o
rganised in mainly 3 areas
:



TCM & telecontrol security infrastructure: investments for deployment,
upgrades, private and outsourced infrastructure
replacement except optical
fibber
s



Optical infrastructures and networks: in
vestments for transmission op
tical
networks and optical infr
astructure

D2.33 RTE Case Study:
NOC & Management organisation

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13




TCM & telecontrol security systems
: investments for deployment, upgrades,
telecommunication and telecontrol networks and systems replacement, built on
above delivery media

Today’s

status is

that a lot of technical and financial frameworks need to be set
-
up

for these
areas
, including
engineering

and technical policies.

More, other projects are out of scope of these TCM policies, but
must

be taken into account
(Substation application
s mi
gration to IP, IP network on private

black optical fibbers, external
RTE metering systems communication
, etc.
)
.

And f
inally,
in this global context,
TCM services provision is evolving

due to
:



End of leased lines




E
nd of
PSTN
in the near future



Global

orientation of telecommunication market to gen
e
ral public needs
(data
very high rate, availability and resilience low requirements, etc.)



New

3G services provision, DSL and microwave wide diffusion to global public
and professionals.

All of these matters
bring
to launch
projects
in the
very
near future.




At the same time, some
new
needs are
identified
:



By type (video float

for video access control or remote help for substation failure
analysis,

digital equipments
remote administration

and supervision
, etc.
),



By
v
olume (exchanged data growth)



By connected site type (including clients sites for operation evolution, mobility,
metering for which TCM solution would differ depending on concerned site, etc.)



By
requirements

(qual
ity, performance, availability and
resilience for remote
reading of operating events, flexibility, etc.)


As a result
, in view of these elements of evolution, growth, changes
, challenges, it
would

be
necessary to ensure all sites coverage using a new and a single national infrastructure for

IP
services delivery.

This architecture, in accordance with the state of the art, with logical and secured
separations of different VPN floats
, might be based on limited private or outsourced
networks, interconnected, and using different kind of links (w
ire line, radio, optical, etc.).

The distribution between private links and outsourced links would be based on a wide
economical and technical study following at least reflexions on performance, security, and
resilience;

engineering

and operation po
licies
would be studied as well at that time.