SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING COURSE PROPOSAL FORM Course Name*:

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SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
COURSE PROPOSAL FORM


Course Name*: Thermodynamics for power plant engineering with CO
2
capture
Course Proposer*: Prof. Jon Gibbins
Have you confirmed that the appropriate resources are in
place (finance, teaching staff, IT)*:
Yes
Have you confirmed that the appropriate support
services are in place (library, computing services)*:
Yes
Normal Year Taken*: Postgraduate
Course Level*: PG
Available to Visiting
Students?*
Available to All Students
Display in Visiting
Student Prospectus:
Yes
SCQF Credits*: 10
Credit Level*
1
: 10
Home Subject Area*: Postgrad (School of Engineering)
Other Subject Area: School of Geosciences, MSc in CCS
Course Organiser*: Jon Gibbins
Course Secretary: TBA
% not taught by this
institution:
0%
Collaboration
Information:

Total Contact
Teaching Hours*:
30
Any costs to be met
by students:

Pre-requisites
(course name &
code)*:
N/A (compulsory CCS MSc courses)
Co-requisites (course
name & code)*:
N/A
Prohibited
Combinations (course
name & code)*:
N/A
Visiting Students
Pre-requisites:

Short Description*: The course presents thermodynamics as a real world subject.
Basic principles and conservation equations, together with
constitutive laws, are applied to a variety of systems and
devices including heat exchangers, nozzles, power cycles, air
conditioning systems and cooling towers and linked to their
application in a range of power plants, including with
integration with proposed CO
2
capture systems.
Keywords
2
: Thermodynamics, power plant, CCS, carbon capture
Fee Code if invoiced
at Course level:
Not applicable

Default Course Mode
of Study*:

Classes & Assessment, incl. centrally arranged exam

Default Delivery
Period*:
Semester 1

Course Type*: Standard
Summary of Intended
Learning Outcomes*:
1. Apply the First Law to simple closed and steady flow
systems using appropriate property data from tables, charts
and equations.
2. Use one-dimensional compressible flow theory to
determine the gas velocities and flow rates in choked and
unchoked nozzles.
3. Use the simple theory of mixtures of ideal gases and
vapours to calculate the performance of plant such as air
conditioning systems and cooling towers.
4. Use the First Law to analyse the performance of simple
power plants.
5. Give a qualitative explanation of some of the
implications of the Second Law for these plants.
6. Carry out simple heat transfer calculations involving
conduction, convection and radiation.
7. Use standard computer packages to calculate Gibbs
function minimisation and apply the results for simple analysis
of chemical equilibrium problems involving coal gasifiers or
autothermal reformers and associated equipment in power
plant applications.?
Special
Arrangements:

Components of
Assessment (inc. %
weightings)*:
Exam 80%
Coursework report 20%
Exam Information*
(please remove 2
nd

Sit if not applicable):
Diet; 1
st
Sit
Diet Month; December
Exam Paper Code; 1
Duration (in hours & mins); 1h 30 min
Stationery; 12 sides/graph
Special Requirements;
Month Assessment Result Due: January
Syllabus/Lecture List:
Study Pattern/Course
Structure:

Benchmark
Statements Assessed:

Teaching Load*: H300_SU254: Mechanical Engineering
Reading Lists:
Convenor of Board of
Examiners:
Ian Bryden


Proposal for new course for CCS MSc
Jon Gibbins and Mathieu Lucquiaud
Institute for Materials and Processes
School of Engineering

This course is proposed to the Board of Studies for inclusion as an elective in the
Master in Carbon Capture and Storage. It is a response to requests by current students
and industrial sponsors of the Scottish Centre of Carbon Storage to increase the
numbers of modules in the Master in CCS covering CO
2
capture and related topics.
The aim of this course is to offer to students an insight into power plant engineering
with CO
2
capture with a particular focus on thermodynamic analysis. It will provide
underpinning understanding for a course on CO
2
capture from a chemical engineering
perspective that is offered to students as an elective in the second semester.

The theoretical requirements for power plant engineering are currently covered in
Thermodynamics 3, a 3
rd
year undergraduate course in Mechanical Engineering
(U01101). We, therefore, propose to share lectures and final exam for both courses,
but replace the lab course for undergraduates - accounting for 20% of the final mark –
with a coursework project for MSc students that involves learning and applying
additional, more advanced, material.

The aim of the coursework is to provide an insight to MSc students into the design
and the operation of power plants/power cycles with gasification and pre-combustion
CO
2
capture. Additional tutorials/mini-lectures will be scheduled for MSc students to
provide the detailed briefing and underpinning theory needed to tackle the
coursework.

A proposed course descriptor is attached, with changes from the existing
Thermodynamics 3 course marked with an asterisk.

U
NIVERSITY OF
E
DINBURGH

S
CHOOL OF
E
NGINEERING


COURSE

DESCRIPTOR

(2010

-

2011)


T
ITLE
Thermodynamics for power plant engineering with CO
2
capture

C
ODE
[To be allocated, if course approved]

L
EVEL
10

C
REDITS
10

S
EMESTER
(
S
) 1

P
REREQUISITES
Closed and open systems. First Law of Thermodynamics applied to
closed and steady-flow open systems. Property relationships for
ideal gases. Real fluids: the meaning of phase, phase change and
saturated states.

D
EGREE
P
ROGRAMMES
Master in Carbon Capture and Storage

C
OURSE
S
TRUCTURE
Learning Method Hours in Course
Lectures (same as Thermodynamics 3) 18
Tutorials (same as Thermodynamics 3) 9
Lecture/tutorials for coursework* 3
Independent Study 70
Notional Student Effort Hours (Total) 100

C
OURSE
O
RGANISER
Jon Gibbins, School of Engineering


C
OURSE
S
TAFF
Jon Gibbins, School of Engineering
Mathieu Lucquiaud, School of Engineering
Hannah Chalmers, School of Engineering
Ondrej Masek, School of Geosciences

S
UMMARY
The course presents thermodynamics as a real world subject. Basic
principles and conservation equations, together with constitutive
laws, are applied to a variety of systems and devices including heat
exchangers, nozzles, power cycles, air conditioning systems and
cooling towers and linked* to their application in a range of power
plants, including with integration with proposed CO
2
capture
systems.

C
OURSE
O
BJECTIVES
1. To provide the basic notions about the most common
thermodynamic systems encountered in Mechanical
Engineering practical applications.
2. To develop a familiarity with the methods of obtaining
thermodynamic property data for fluids through the use of
property tables, charts and equations.
3. To illustrate ways of obtaining the properties of mixtures and
to apply these to engineering applications such as cooling
towers and air conditioning systems.
4. To present basic heat transfer theory and to apply it to
estimating the heat transfer in systems involving combinations
of conduction, convection and radiation, and to the design of
heat exchangers.
5. To illustrate the analysis of compressible flow through nozzles
and introduce the basics of supersonic flows.
6. To illustrate the analysis of power cycles by, first, a qualitative
discussion of their attributes and, second, by calculating the
work output and efficiency of a variety of gas and steam power
cycles.
7*. To provide basic notions of chemical reaction equilibrium for
coal gasification and hydrogen production.
8*. Coal gasification and gas autothermal reforming, power plants
incorporating these technologies and their characteristics
related to other technology options.

S
PECIFIC
L
EARNING
O
UTCOMES
On completion of the course, students should be able to:
1. Apply the First Law to simple closed and steady flow systems
using appropriate property data from tables, charts and
equations.
2. Use one-dimensional compressible flow theory to determine
the gas velocities and flow rates in choked and unchoked
nozzles.
3. Use the simple theory of mixtures of ideal gases and vapours
to calculate the performance of plant such as air conditioning
systems and cooling towers.
4. Use the First Law to analyse the performance of simple power
plants.
5. Give a qualitative explanation of some of the implications of
the Second Law for these plants.
6. Carry out simple heat transfer calculations involving
conduction, convection and radiation.
7*. Use standard computer packages to calculate Gibbs function
minimisation and apply the results for simple analysis of
chemical equilibrium problems involving coal gasifiers or
autothermal reformers and associated equipment in power
plant applications.

L
EARNING
R
ESOURCES
Moran, Shapiro, Munson, De Witt, Introduction to Thermal
Systems Engineering (Wiley). Modern book + CD-ROM, covers all
the course programme
Çengel and Boles, Thermodynamics: An Engineering Approach,
(McGraw Hill). Recommended for the level 2 Thermodynamics
course.
Higman and van der Burgt, Gasification, (Elsevier).
Comprehensive and very up-to-date treatment of modern
gasification technology.
C
OMPONENTS OF
A
SSESSMENT
Element Contribution (%)
Final Examination 80
Coursework* 20
Total (100%) 100
Examination – Three questions out of four to be answered
in 1.5 hours. Appropriate reasonable adjustments can be arranged
for disabled students.
Coursework - Report describing and analysing power
plant with pre-combustion CO
2
capture, with supporting
description of analysis methods and literature survey.
C
OURSE
S
YLLABUS

Part I: Applied thermodynamics
Lecture 1 - Unit Overview and Revision
Introduction. The principles of thermodynamics.
Lecture 2 – Working fluids
Ideal gas properties: the equations. Real fluid properties: charts and tables.
Lecture 3 – Open systems
Balance equations; energy transfer in simple components (compressors, turbines, valves).
Lecture 4 – Compressible flow
One-dimensional flow through nozzles and diffusers. Choking of nozzles and critical pressure
ratio. Design and off-design behaviour of convergent and convergent-divergent nozzles.
Lecture 5 – Gas-vapour mixtures
The vapour properties; cooling with condensation; psychrometry, specific and relative
humidity.
Lecture 6 – Gas-vapour mixtures (continued)
Thermodynamic transformations of moist air: isobaric cooling or heating, isothermal
compression, mixing. Applications: cooling towers, air conditioning.
Part II: Power Cycles
Lecture 7 – Introduction to power cycles
Power generation; energetic efficiency; Carnot cycle and Second Law efficiency.
Lecture 8 – The Rankine cycle
The Rankine cycle; superheat and reheat; regenerative feed-heating.
Lecture 9 – The Joule-Brayton cycle
Air standard Joule cycle and gas turbine plant; component efficiencies, exhaust gas heat
exchangers, reheat.
Lecture 10 – The Otto cycle and the Diesel cycle
Ideal cycles and real cycles; efficiencies; effect of auxiliary compression.
Lecture 11 – Refrigeration cycles
The reverse vapour compression cycle; coefficient of performance; self-regulation (throttling
valve); absorption machines.
Part III: Heat Transfer
Lecture 12 – Introduction to heat transfer
Introduction to heat transfer: conduction, convection and radiation; energy balance in a solid,
conservation equations.
Lecture 13 – Heat transfer: conduction
Conduction: Fourier’s Law; steady-state and transient conduction (lumped capacitance
method).
Lecture 14 – Conduction heat transfer (continued)
Heat transfer in a circular geometry; cooling fins.
Lecture 15 – Heat transfer: convection
Convection heat transfer; typical heat transfer coefficients; dimensionless numbers.
Correlations for free convection and forced convection.
Lecture 16 – Boiling and condensation
Introduction to two-phase heat transfer; nucleation of a bubble; boiling curve; critical heat
flux; flow boiling.
Lecture 17 – Heat transfer: radiation
The equations for radiation from a surface; heat exchange by radiation between surfaces;
concept of black body; spectral, directional and total quantities; combined radiation and
convection.
Lecture 18 – Heat exchangers
Different types of heat exchangers; energy balances for co-current and counter-current heat
exchangers; design methods, concept of NTU.

COURSEWORK*
Analysis of power stations with pre-combustion CO
2
capture

Supported by tutorials/mini-lectures but primarily independent study
Components
i) Use of standard Gibbs function minimisation software (GASEQ) to predict the performance of
gasifiers, autothermal reformers and catalytic shift reactors used for pre-combustion CO
2
capture.
ii) Integration of pre-combustion capture with other thermodynamic components in power plant
applications.
iii) Analysis of integrated system performance and comparison with existing literature.
iv) Case study, reporting and discussion of results.