WHS Newsletter August 2013 - Women's History Scotland

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16 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 9 μήνες)

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1


WOMEN’S HISTORY SCOTLAND NEWSLETTER


(August

2013)



Please send items for inclusion in the next
newsletter to Elizabeth Ewan at
eewan@uoguelph.ca


1.

Conferences, Worksh
ops

2.

Lectures,
Events

3.

Calls for Papers, Contributions

4.

New Projects

5.

Employment, Scholarships

6.

Prizes

7.

Query

8.

And Finally


1.
CONFERENCES, WORKSHOPS


Gender and Political Culture, 1400
-
1800

A Joint Conference organised by History and the Centre for Humanities, Music

and
Performing Arts
(HuMPA) at Plymouth University and Umeå Group for

Pre
-
modern Studies

Venue
:
Plymouth University, 29
-
31 August 2013


This conference investigates gender and political culture during the period

1400 to 1800. Themes
explored include the relati
onship between gender, power

and political authority; gendered aspects of
monarchy; representations of

power and authority; gender, office
-
holding, policy
-
making and counsel;

courts, patronage and political influence; elite culture and political

networks;
gender, the public sphere
and political participation; popular

politics, protest and petitioning; manuscript, print, oral, material and

visual cultures; news, intelligence and the spread of information; political

ideas, ideologies and language;
conceptuali
zations of ‘public’ and ‘private’

spheres and what constituted ‘power’ and ‘politics’; the family
as a

‘political unit’; the politicization of social activities:

marriage
-
arranging, placing children in other
households, gift
-
giving,

hospitality and letter
-
writing.


Keynote speakers include Professor Barbara J. Harris (University of North

Carolina, Chapel Hill) and
Professor Merry Wiesner
-
Hanks (University of

Wisconsin
-
Milwaukee),


Speakers include Professor Susan Broomhall (The University of Western

Austral
ia), Professor Elaine
Chalus (Bath Spa University), Dr Nadine

Akkerman (University of Leiden, The Netherlands), Professor
Ralph A.

Houlbrooke (University of Reading), and Professor Stanley Chojnacki

(University of North
Carolina, Chapel Hill).

For Full Con
ference Details and Programme, see:

http://www.plymouth.ac.uk/pages/dynamic.asp?page=events&eventID=7525&showEvent=1


If you have any queries please contact Pr
ofessor James Daybell

(
james.daybell@plymouth.ac.uk
,

Plymouth University or Professor Svante Norrhem

(
svante.norrhem@historia.umu.se
), Umeå
University, Sweden.


International Federation for Research in Women’s History Conference


incorporating the 22
nd

annual conference of the Women’s History Network, UK

Women’s Histories: the Local and the Global

Venue
:
29
th

August
-
1
st

September 2013 at Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield, UK


2


In 2013 the Women’s History Network is combining its 22
nd

Annual Conference with the international
conference of the International Federation for Research in Women’s History. This will be a won
derful
opportunity for us to make connections with scholars of women’s history from around the world. Over 200
proposals have already been received following the first call for papers.

Our conference will explore the history of women worldwide, from archa
ic to contemporary periods.
Engaging with the recent global and transnational turns in historical scholarship, it will examine the ways
in which histories of women can draw on and reshape these approaches to understanding the past. It will
explore the inte
rplay between the ‘local’ and the ‘global’ in histories of women, and discuss the
relationship between nation
-
based traditions of women’s history writing and transnational approaches
which highlight connections and comparisons between women’s lives in diff
erent localities.

Key questions the conference will address are:

How can women’s histories reshape our understanding of the relationship between the ‘local’ and the
‘global’?

What implications does a transnational framework of analysis have for nation
-
bas
ed traditions of writing
women’s history?

For details of strand themes see the conference website:
http://www.ifrwh2013conf.org.uk


Women Artists and Pop Art



a symposium 27 September 2013

The symposium acc
ompanies a full retrospective exhibition of the work of Pauline Boty (British Pop artist
1938
-
66) at Wolverhampton Art Gallery, running until November 16th.

Issues that surround women
artists engagement with Pop will be explored and their vibrant contribu
tion to what has been a male
dominated genre celebrated.Come and see the exhibition, engage with the debate, or, if appropriate, give
a paper about your work in this area.

http://www.wolverhamptonart.org.uk/events/women
-
and
-
pop
-
art
-
symposium/


The North West Labour History Society

Venue:
Manchester

23
rd

Novem
ber 2013


The North West Labour History Society is celebrating


40 years of activity promoting labour
history


with a
conference on women’s


history on 23 November 2013 in Manchester.


There will be sessions on


topics such as music, trade unionism, socialism, Votes for Women, socialism
and feminism. The speakers will include Lindsey German, Claire Mooney,

Alice Nutter, Louise


Raw, Rae
Street and Sonja Tiernan.


The fee for the day will be £10 waged/£5 unwaged.


For


more information


please visit

http://workershistory.wordpress.com/nwlhs
-
eve
nts



The Economic and Social History Society of Scotland: ‘Economy and Society in Rural Scotland: a
conference in the memory of Malcolm Gray


Venue:

Inverness, Friday 20
th



Saturday 21
st

September 2013.


Keynote

speakers:
Emeritus Professor Eric
Richards, Flinders University,

Emeritus Professor Jim Hunter,
University of the Highlands and Islands, Professor Ewen Cameron, University of Edinburgh.

Programme and registration details to be announced soon.


Advance enquiries
to

iain@keapub.fsnet.co.uk



Scottish Hist
ory
Society, Publication Workshop

Venue
:
St Andrews University, 1pm


4pm, Saturday 2 November,
Old Class Library, St John’s House,
South Street, St Andrews.


‘A man will blithely do
in politics what he would kick a man downstairs for in ordinary life’



Lord
Rosebery, first President of the Society

The Scottish History Society is delighted to announce a new series of publication workshops, the first of
which will be held at St Andrews

University.

These workshops are designed to introduce postgraduates, postdoctoral researchers and academics to
the work the Society does in the publication of scholarly original sources, and its value in the modern
academic environment, as well as provide

an insight into the submission, reviewing and publication
processes the Society utilises.

Speakers at the workshop will include:

3


Dr John MacAskill, recently published with the Scottish History Society

Dr John McCallum, Publications Secretary for the Scott
ish History Society

Dr Annie Tindley, Communications Officer for the Scottish History Society

To register for this event, please email Dr Annie Tindley at:
annietindley@hotmail.com


2013 CHORD Con
ference ‘Retailing and the Senses: Historical Perspectives’

Venue:
Marks & Spencer Company Archive, Leeds

5 September 2013


The programme, together with abstracts, registration forms and further information about the venue, can
be found at:
http://home.wlv.ac.uk/~in6086/2013conf.htm

The programme includes:

Clare Backhouse (Courtauld Institute of Art, UK), ‘Broadside ballads, Dress and the Senses in
Seventeenth
-
Century Engl
and’; Lucy A. Bailey (University of Northampton, UK), ‘An Assault on the
Senses: Cultural Representations of the Victorian Village Shop’; Ben Highmore (Sussex University, UK),
‘Provençal Herbs and the Chicken Brick: Sensual Orchestration at the first Habit
at Store’; Ai Hisano
(University of Delaware, US), ‘The Color of Taste: Selling Food in Clear Packages in the Early
-
Twentieth
-
Century United States’; Serena Dyer ( University of Warwick, UK), ‘”Discomposing the Goods”: Sensory
Shopping and the Consumption
of Clothing, 1750
-
1850’; Angela Loxham (Lancaster University, UK),
‘Clothing, Touch and Liberal Governance’; Anneleen Arnout (University of Leuven, Belgium), 'Sense &
sensibility. Shopping and comfort in the Galeries Saint
-
Hubert in nineteenth
-
century Brus
sels'; S

tephanie Rains (NUI Maynooth, Ireland), ‘Touch Wood: Women, Shopping and the Politics of Sitting
Down’; Amber Martin (University of Nottingham, UK), ‘Sex Shops and the Senses: The Sensory Nature of
Sex Product Consumption’; Tracy Smith (Canterbury

Christ Church University, UK), 'Pleasure, Identity
and the Absence of Touch: The Conflicting Characteristics of the Online and Physical Retail
Environments'; Katy Mullin (University of Leeds, UK), ‘Victorian Shop
-
girls, Sexuality and the Senses’


The fee
is £26. For further information and to register, please see the web
-
pages:
http://home.wlv.ac.uk/~in6086/2013conf.htm

Or contact Karin Dannehl at
k.dannehl@wlv.ac.uk

or Laura Ugolini at:
L.Ugolini@wlv.ac.uk

News about CHORD events can now also be found here:
http://retailhistory.wordpress.com/about/

CHORD web
-
pages:
http://home.wlv.ac.uk/~in6086/chord.html

The Great War and Global History


Venue
:
9
-
10 January 2014

Maison Française, Oxford

A two
-
day conference hosted by the Oxford Centre for Global History, Changing Character of War
programme and Maison Française d’Oxford.


Convenors:
Hew Strachan, James Belich, John Darwin


PLENARY SPEAKERS:


FINANCE:
Patrick O’Brien (Oxford)
‘Warfare with Revolutionary and Napoleonic France and the
Consolidation of British Industrial Supremacy’;
Georges
-
Henri Soutou (Paris)
‘They Marched Singing
into Bankruptcy: Finance in the First World War’


REVOLUTION:
Dominic Lieven (Cambridge)
‘Imperiali
sm, War and Revolution: a Russian Angle’;
Hans van de Ven (Cambridge)
Title TBC


IDENTITIES:
Hervé Drévillon (Paris)
‘Identities and Otherness as Agents of Globalization in Early
Modern Wars‘;
Tamara Scheer ((Ludwig Boltzmann
-
Institute for Social Science History, Vienna);
‘Habsburg Empire’s National Identities during World War One’



MANPOWER:
Jos Gommans (Leiden)
‘Fair Play in Early Modern Warfare’;
Douglas Porch
(California)

‘From Carnot to Re
ynaud: The Ascent and Disintegration of the French Nation in Arms, 1793
-
1940’


MYTHS:
Margaret MacMillan (Oxford)
Title TBC;
Sudhir Hazareesingh (Oxford)
Title TBC


GEOPOLITICS:
Tonio Andrade (Atlanta)
‘The Global Military Balance: A Long View, 900
-
1918’;
N
aoko
Shimazu (Birkbeck)
Title TBC


RESISTANCE:
Martin Ceadel (Oxford)
Title TBC;
Karen Hagemann (UNC)
‘Women, War and the
Nation: Gendering the History of the Wars Against Napoleon’



4



For further information visit our website
http://global.history.ox.ac.uk/?page_id=1145

or email
global@history.ox.ac.uk

.

Registration open from 1 August.


Limited places available.


2. LECTURES,

EVENTS


City of Gangs


Glasgow and the Rise of the British Gangster

by Andrew Davies

Venue: Mitchell Library, 14 Augus 2013


-

A new book on Glasgow gangs in the 1920s and 1930s by Andrew Davies is being launched at The
Mitchel
l Library, Glasgow
. The launch includes a talk by Andrew who used extensively the archives here.


Details of the launch and ticketing are at:

http://www.glasgo
wlife.org.uk/libraries/the
-
mitchell
-
library/whats
-
on/Pages/home.aspx

During the 1920s and 1930s, Glasgow gained an unenviable and enduring notoriety as Britain's gang city
-

the 'Scottish Chicago'. Out of the most dilapidated and overcrowded tenements in B
ritain stepped young
men and women dressed like Hollywood gangsters and their molls. On the city's streets they took centre
stage in dramas of their own making, fighting territorial battles laced with religious sectarianism and
running protection rackets

m
odelled

on those of the American underworld.


3. SEMINAR SERIES

Gend
er and History in the America
s



2013/14 is the second year of the ‘Gender and History in the Americas’ seminar series at the Institute for
Historical Research, London. Held at 17.30 on the first Monday of the month, the series offers a forum for
speakers to present research investigatin
g women’s and gender history from a hemispheric perspective
that stretches from Canada to Argentina, Mexico to the Caribbean. The presentation of works
-
in
-
progress
and contributions from postgraduate and early career scholars are particularly encouraged, r
eflecting our
desire to create a series in which new and cutting
-
edge ideas can be shared and discussed in an
intellectual and supportive environment.


For further information, visit the website (
http://www.history.ac.uk/events/seminars/370
) or contact the
Society for the History of Women in the Americas (
shawsociety@gmail.com
)


7th October 2013 Janet Floyd, King’s College Lond
on, “Letter
-
Writing, Friendship and the Foote
-
Gilder
Correspondence”


4th November 2013 Antonia Mackay, Oxford Brookes University & Goldsmiths University of London,
“The Influence of Architecture in Cold War Literature”


2nd December 2013 Joy Porter, University of Hull, “The Woman who Changed Nixon: LaDonna Harris’s
Lessons on How Small Nations Can Successfully Relate to Entrenched Power”


6th January 2014 Henrice Altink, University of York, “War and the Female Franchise

in Jamaica”


3rd February 2014 Laila Haidarali, University of Essex, “Modelling Beauty Brown: Sex, Race,
Representation and African American Womanhood in the early Cold War era”


3rd March 2014 Claire Irving, University of Newcastle, “Women of Letters
-

Editing and Writing the
Caribbean”


7th April 2014 Stephen Robinson, University of Southampton, ““Freemen and Citizens”: The Citizen
-
Soldier and the Spanish
-
American War of 1898”


2nd June 2014 Morwenna Chaffe, University of East Anglia, “An Incurable State: Involuntary
Childlessness in Nineteenth
-
Century America”


Convenors:
Professor Jay Kleinberg (Brunel University); Dr Rachel Ritchie (Brunel University)

Dr Inge Dornan (Brunel

University); Dr Lee Sartain (Portsmouth University)

Dr Dawn
-
Marie Gibson (RHUL; Ms Imaobong Umoren (Oxford University)

Dr Sinead McEneaney (Saint Mary’s University College); Dr Natalie Zacek (University of Manchester)





5


4. CALLS FOR PAPERS, CONTRIBUTI
ONS


Emotion, Ritual and Power in Europe: 1200 to the Present
,


Venue:
11
-
12 February 2014, ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions: Europe, 1200
-
1800,
University of Adelaide

Abstract Deadline: 31 Aug 2013 (500 words)


Keynote speakers:

Prof

Carol Lansing, University of California, Santa Barbara




Prof Harvey Whitehouse, University of Oxford

The relationship between emotion, ritual and power has been at the heart of anthropological research for
over a century, yet it is only recently
that the emotions, rather than the ritual, have moved to the centre of
the academic debate. This shift in focus has been motivated both by Renato Rosaldo’s observation that
some rituals are designed to manage emotions (such as grief), as much as rituals ar
e designed to create
emotion in the participants. Equally, the growth of the field of emotionology has led to greater complexity
in the understanding of how emotions work in cultural context. The relationship between ritual and the
creation, maintenance an
d destabilisation of power has not gone unexplored given the centrality of ritual
to religious practice and to institutional structures, yet the place emotion plays in the relationship between
ritual and power has received less attention, particularly in a
n historical context. This collaboratory,
hosted by the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions, will explore the nature of these
relationships, seeking to better understand how emotions act within ritual to inform balances of power.
We are pa
rticularly interested in the ways that rituals and emotions have changed over time, and the
ways that rituals, emotions and power have been implicated in processes of change and continuity.


Papers are now sought that address this theme within a European c
ontext, or explore European
emotions in a global context, between 1200 and the present day. Within the bigger conference theme,
papers may wish to explore, but are not limited to:



the relationship between rituals and routines and where these cross over;



where rituals happen


the household, the street, sacred spaces, institutions


and its
implications;



the emotional resonances of objects and texts (including visual culture and architecture) in rituals;



types of rituals


rites of passage, religious cer
emonies, state
-
sponsored spectacles


and their
emotional contexts;



individual emotions v. collective emotions, and participant v. audience emotions;



rituals that inform different types of power, including personal, familial, community, institutional
and

national;



the interplay of facets of identity, such as gender, class and ethnicity in ritual;



the dynamics and performance of ritual and how it is informed by emotion or in turn creates
emotion;



rituals and change over time v. rituals as static/traditi
onal;



and boredom as emotion in ritual contexts.

Rituals could include: public and private executions; coronations and state rituals; religious rites (baptism,
weddings, confirmation); rituals associated with festivals; food and cleanliness rituals; famil
y rituals, such
as household prayers, bedding rituals, and childbirth rituals. Interdisciplinary perspectives are particularly
welcome.

It is intended that the proceedings of this collaboratory will be published as an edited collection.

Deadlines

Call for

papers: 31 August 2013

Notification of acceptance: 20 September 2013

Full papers for circulation: 13 January 2014

10
-
15 min presentations of full papers: 11
-
12 February 2014

Abstracts of no more than 500 words, and a short bio, should be emailed to
both

Merridee Bailey,
merridee.bailey@adelaide.edu.au
, and Katie Barclay,
katie.barclay@adelaide.edu.au

by the deadline of
6


the
31 August 2013
. Questions

or queries can also be addressed to the above. Please see our website
for updates

:
http://www.historyofemotions.org.au/events/e
motion,
-
ritual
-
and
-
power
-
in
-
europe
-
1200
-
to
-
the
-
present.aspx?page=2


Military Women

Venue:
University of Worcester
Saturday 23
rd

November 2013

Abstract Deadline: 30 Sept 2013 (300 words)

The University of Worcester’s annual Women’s History Conference seeks
papers for this year’s event
under the heading of ‘Military Women’. Potential topics may include, but are not restricted to:


Covert women



female agents

Enemy women



“Booby traps” and sexually
-
transmitted disease, “Keep Mum She’s Not So Dumb”

Femininit
y and Feminism in the military

“G.I. Jane”



career military women, combat and killing

Paramilitary women


women in non
-
conventional military roles

“Private Benjamin”

-

Representations of fighting women

R&R



military prostitution, “Hookers” &

“Comfort Women”

Women in recruitment & anti
-
recruitment



images in recruitment media, “date strikes”, the white
feather campaign

Women as military leaders


female politicians and advisers


We invite you to submit a paper based on your current research i
n the field of Military Women. We
welcome submissions on any country and in any historical period.

S
end an abstract to
Dr Wendy Toon
w.toon@worc.ac.uk

.


Women as Wives and Workers: Marking Fifty Years of
The Femini
ne Mystique

Venue:
Saturday 30
th

November 2013 at Royal Holloway University of London

Abstract Deadline: 14 Oct 2013 (250 words)


2013 marks the fiftieth anniversary of
The Feminine Mystique
’s publication.


From the outset, Betty
Friedan’s text had an
enormous influence on academic and popular audiences, selling millions and
shaping feminist discourse about the housewife throughout the Western world.


Yet at the same time, full
-
time housewifery was becoming both a less common experience and a cultural b
attlefield.


Since the
1950s, levels of employment amongst married women (notably white women) have risen enormously.


Women have increasingly been confronted with the ‘superwoman’ paradox, which Friedan herself
encapsulated: writing about ‘the zombie hous
ewife’ and ‘the problem that has no name’ whilst being a
working wife and mother.


Many other women likewise negotiated domesticity and paid work, but their
experiences were by no means uniform and were shaped by various other factors including race, age,
sexuality and socio
-
economic status.

This conference aims to draw these themes together by offering an opportunity to explore
The Feminine
Mystique
alongside discussions of women and employment.


Areas of consideration may include but are
not limited to:

Women’s paid employment



The Feminine Mystique
, its impact and critiques, for example with regards to race

The international impact of
The Feminine Mystique

Domesticity and the figure of the housewife: experiences, rights, cultural portrayals

Discour
ses of motherhood and fatherhood



Evolving notions of family

Gender and education



Notions of ‘having it all’ and being ‘Superwoman’

The National Organization for Women: its impact, legacy and
critics

The development of women's organisations and networks since the 1960s


We invite papers that address these topics either broadly or specifically. While papers with a particular
emphasis on mid
-
twentieth century America may be given priority, we als
o encourage scholars to present
7


work with a comparative perspective (across time and/or space) or looking at other geographical areas.
Panel submissions are also welcome.


A special issue of
History of Women in the Americas

based on the
conference papers i
s planned, subject to the usual peer review procedure.

‘Women as Wives and Workers: Marking Fifty Years of
The Feminine Mystique
’ is the sixth annual
conference of the Society for the History of Women in the Americas (SHAW) and is being co
-
organized
with T
he Bedford Centre for the History of Women at Royal Holloway University of London.


The
conference organisers are Helen Glew (University of Westminster), Jane Hamlett (RHUL), Sinead
McEneaney (St. Mary’s University College) and Rachel Ritchie (Brunel Unive
rsity).

A 250
-
word abstract and a short biography should be emailed to
thefemininemystiqueat50@gmail.com

by
Monday 14
th

October 2013.


Please use the same email address for any other enquiries about
the event.

LABOUR AND RACE IN MODERN GERMAN HISTORY

Venue
:
Birkbeck, University of London on 27


29 March 2014

Abstract Deadline: 30 Sept 2013 (500 words)


This conference is organised by Birkbeck, University of London, the Pears Institute for the study of
Antisemitism and The Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust and Genocide.


‘Race’ and ‘labour’ describe two of the great mobilising forces which sh
aped Germany in the modern
world. This conference seeks to explore their interaction in a wide range of contexts. The chosen
timeframe is deliberately broad, stretching from the transformation of agrarian society in the early
nineteenth century to question
s concerning labour and race
in the Third Reich and post
-
war Germany
.
Submissions are welcome from historians and scholars from neighbouring disciplines; and papers
probing less well
-
trodden paths of inquiry are encouraged. Proposals of 500 words for
20 mi
nute papers
,
accompanied by a short CV, should be sent by 30 September to
pearsinstitute@bbk.ac.uk
.


The call for papers can be found on the Pears Institute

http://www.pearsinstitute.bbk.ac.uk/

T
his conference is one of a series in the research exchange programme, ‘Germany and the World:
Cultural Exchanges and Mutual Perceptions’, funded by the German Academ
ic Exchange Service
(DAAD).


Congress of the International Committee of

Historical Sciences, special theme: The History of the
Girl,

Venue
:
Jinan, China, August 23
-
29, 2015

Abstract Deadline: 30 Nov 2013



The Congress of the International Committee of Historical Sciences will be held in Jinan, China from 23
-
29 August 2015. One of the Specialised Themes focusses on the History of the Girl. The aim of this
session is to bring together scholars working in the
field and to identify common themes and differences
in the history of the girl across the world. In order to establish some cohesion for the discussion the focus
will be on girls aged from early adolescence to the early 20s. Paper proposals are welcome on
all

periods of time as well as from as wide a geographical span as possible.

Topics to be discussed include:


Public discourses on girls

*
Girls and the family

*
The culture of adolescent girls

*
Coming of age

*
Sex
education

*
Debates on the education of

girls

*
Dress and fashion

*
Girls


work

*
Consumerism and girls

*

The modern girl

*
Representations of girls

*
Literature and writing for girls


Professor Mary O'Dowd

School of History and Anthropology

Queen's University Belfast

Belfast BT7 1NN

Email: m.od
owd@qub.ac.uk

Visit the website at

http://www.cish.org/congres/ST29
-
Towards
-
global
-
history
-
girl.pdf


8


S
ervice and Servants in
Early Modern Culture, 1500

1750



The

Journal of Early Modern Studies (
http://www.fupress.net/index.php/bsfm
-
jems/index
) is now inviting
contributions for volume 4, to be released online in March 2015. Jointly edited

by William C. Carroll
(Boston University) and Jeanne Clegg (Università Ca' Foscari, Venice), JEMS 4, entitled Service and
Servants in Early Modern Culture, 1500
-
1750, aims to bring together scholars from across a wide
disciplinary spectrum to inquire into

differences and similarities, continuities and changes in the ethics,
representation and practice of service and servitude in different countries and contexts. The issue will be
open to contributions on oral and visual forms of cultural expression as well

as textual, and we invite
studies of emerging voices and works intended for and by, as well as about, servants and
service.Contributions addressing issues of class, gender, and ethnic/national representations are
particularly encouraged.

Main deadlines:

1 October 2013: adhere to project and send working title and short abstract to William C. Carroll
(
wcarroll@bu.edu
) and Jeanne Clegg (
jfclegg@unive.it
).



31 January 2014: finalize paper for submission to referees.

Articles must comply with the editorial norms and must not exceed 12,000 words, including endnotes and
bibliography. All articles are published in English. Please be so kind as to have your
paper revised by a
native speaker.

Journal of Early Modern Studies
http://www.fupress.net/index.php/bsfm
-
jems/index





C
all for book proposals: Women &
Gender in the Early Modern World

The study of women and gender offers some of the most vital and innovative challenges to current
scholarship on the early modern period. For more than a decade now,
Women and Gender in the Early
Modern World

has served as a forum for presenting fresh ideas and original approaches to the field.
Interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary in scope, this Ashgate book series strives to reach beyond
geographical limitations to explore the experiences of early modern w
omen and the nature of gender in
Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Africa. We welcome proposals for both single
-
author volumes and edited
collections which expand and develop this continually evolving field of study.

In addition to works focused on early mod
ern Europe, we are eager for submissions about women in non
-
western cultures, the colonial Americas, and the role of women and gender in science, magic and
technology.

To submit a proposal, or for more information, please contact: Erika Gaffney, Publishing

Manager,
egaffney@ashgate.com


CALL FOR REVIEWERS
: Atlantis

Atlantis: Critical Studies in Gender, Culture, and Social Justice is now a completely on
-
line journal and is
in the process of building its

reviewer database. If you are faculty (full time, term, part time, sessional) and
are interested in being included in the reviewer database, please register on the Atlantis
website:
http://journals.msvu.ca/index.php/atlantis/index
. Just hit 'register' and follow the instructions...it's
really easy :) Please don't forget to also include your research interests, and if you could indicate whether
you are willing to review French langu
age manuscripts, that would be greatly appreciated.

Many thanks in advance for your participation in this process and your support of Atlantis!



Ann Braithwaite and Annalee Lepp, editors

Dr. Annalee Lepp
,
Associate Professor and Chair
,
Department of Women
's Studies

University of Victoria P.O. Box 1700, Station CSC
,
Victoria, BC V8W 2Y2

Canada

E
-
Mail:
alepp@uvic.ca

Office: Clearihue B107

Office Phone: 250
-
721
-
6157

Fax: 250
-
721
-
7210

http://web.uvic.ca/women/

9


4. NEW
PROJECTS

Women’s Poetry in English, Irish, Scots, Scots Gaelic and Welsh 1400
-
1800

A new three
-
year Research Project Grant focuses on women’s poetry in English, Irish, Scots, Scots
Gaelic and Welsh 1400
-
1800. Funded by The Leverhulme Trust, this new projec
t cuts across the
linguistic boundaries of the period 1400
-
1800. It will consider national comparisons and contrasts as well
as gender. As such, it will be the first comparative study of women’s poetry in Ireland, Scotland, and
Wales in this period. The pr
oject will produce an edited anthology of selected poems (translated into
English where necessary) and a volume of critical essays. The project began on 1 February 2013 under
the leadership of Professor Sarah Prescott at Aberystwyth University in collabora
tion with Catherine
Charnell
-
White (Aberystwyth), Kate Mathis (Aberystwyth), Marie
-
Louise Coolahan (National University of
Ireland, Galway), and Sarah Dunnigan (Edinburgh). A website, blog, and twitter feed devoted to the
project are coming soon (
http://www.womenspoetry.aber.ac.uk
).

5. EMPLOYMENT, STUDENTSHIPS

Northumbria University

Application deadline: 8 August 2013


PhD Opportunity.


Northumbria University invites applications for a fully
-
funded PhD studentship; the
studentship is associated with the ESRC
-
funded 'European, Ethnic and Expatriate' project, which pursues
a longitudinal comparison of German and British social networking an
d associational formations in
modern
-
day Asia. The studentship will run for three years, starting 8 October 2013, and will be based at
Northumbria University, in the Faculty of Arts, Design and Social Sciences.

The specific PhD topic of the studentship is

open to discussion with the lead supervisor. The topic must
be within the field of History, although, provided that clear interdisciplinary links to History are made, it
may fall more broadly within the Social Sciences. The ESRC project with which the stu
dentship is linked
investigates the role ethnic and cultural organisations play in British and German expatriate social
networking in Asia to shed light on the function of ethnicity among expatriates. Within this wider research
context the studentship topi
c may examine themes that fall within any of the following broad areas:
returning British or German expats/sojourners from Asia and their experience of the return 'home' (historic
or contemporary); ethnic associations among migrants from Asia in Britain or

Germany (historic or
contemporary); the history of elite social networking connected to Asia, for instance through organisations
such as the China Association.

Applications must be submitted by Thursday, 8 August 2013 to tanja.bueltmann@northumbria.ac.uk
.


For
full details about the application process and forms, please visit
http://www.ethnicandexpatriate.co.uk/studentship
.



‘Voices from the Factory Floor’

An oral history
project to capture the experiences of women who worked in the manufacturing
industries in Wales 1945
-

75

Application deadline: 22 Aug 2013


Following our successful application to HLF, we are now seeking to recruit TWO FIELD OFFICERS (one
each


North and
South Wales) to organise and carry out oral history interviews with women who worked
in the manufacturing industries in Wales, 1945
-
75.

The posts are on a freelance basis for ONE year.

For terms and conditions or for more information, contact the Project C
o
-
ordinator: 07767 895291 or see
our website,
www.womensarchivewales.org/news.html

/

Cymraig
-

www.womensarchivewales.org/newyddion
.html

Please send CV and letter of application to: 10 Bwrw Road, Loughor, Swansea SA4 6TX
by August 22
nd
.

Interviews will take place w/b 2
nd

September.


10


6. ESSAY PRIZES

2013 ESHSS Essay Prize
.

The Committee of the Economic &

Social History Society of Scotland awards
an annual Postgraduate Prize for a Research Essay on a Scottish Theme in the general area of
economic, social and cultural history.


The winner's or winners' essay(s) will be automatically considered
for publicati
on in the Journal of Scottish Historical Studies.


The closing date for the next prize is 31
December 2013.


Postgraduate researchers are encouraged to make submissions
-

see the ESHSS
website for more details.
www.eshss.co.uk



Women’s History Network Book Prize

It is a great pleasure

to let members know the

outcome

of the Women's History Network Book Prize for
2012.

We had a small but strong field this year and t
he panel of judges were given the opportunity to read
some original scholarship by young scholars.

The winner of this year's competition is Angela
Davis's

Modern Motherhood: Women and Family in England, 1945
-
2000

(Manchester University Press,
2012).


Cong
ratulations to Angela for a book that

the judges

commend

as 'a fascinating survey of
women's experience of motherhood', 'eminently readable', 'a solid and thoughtful study', 'an outstanding
piece of oral history', and 'ambitiously wide ranging'.

The panel

wishes to thank all the authors and
publishers who took part in the competition

for

the opportunity to

read work of such high quality.

The
prize will be presented

at

the WHN conference

in Sheffield on Friday 30 August 2012

Ann Kettle (Chair of panel of ju
dges)

7.
QUERY

A query has been received from New Zealand about the woman whose name is commemorated in the
Ship Jane Gifford which carried some of the early Scottish migrants to New Zealand in 1848. The ship
may have been built in Greenock in 1842. If anyone has any in
formation about Jane Gifford, could they
please contact me at
eewan@uoguelph.ca


8.AND FINALLY


Kay Matheson and the Stone of Destiny


Kay Matheson, one of the four students who returned the Stone of Destiny, taken
by Edward I to England
in 1296, to Scotland in 1950, has died at the age of 84. As a domestic science student at the University
of Glasgow, she joined three others to remove the stone from Westminster Abbey on Christmas day.She
drove the car carrying the

stone through police roadblocks after it was taken from Westminster Abbey on
Christmas day. Despite a huge manhunt, she was able to cross into Scotland. The stone was later placed
in Arbroath Abbey and taken back to England, but it was returned to Scotlan
d in 1996. Kay Matheson
became a teacher and a Gaelic scholar. Her story was told in the film The Stone of Destiny, while the
int
errogations of her by the authorities

featured in another film

An Ceasnachadh,

Matheson was active in
reviving the use of Gaeli
c in Wester Ross
.

She was said to draw inspiration from the nineteenth
-
century
Gaelic poet

Mairi Mhor nan Oran
-

Big Mary of the Songs.

Source: The Scotsman 8 July 2013


The Fishwives’ Path

The ‘Fishwives’ Path’ between Buckie on the Moray Firth and the Speyside town of Keith, used by Buckie
fishwives on their way to sell their wares was officially reopened in early July
by Scotland’s First Minister
Alex Salmond.

It has been completely restor
ed by the Buckie Regeneration Project. Fishwives made the
round trip of 26 miles a day carrying creels of fish to Keith to sell. The last Buckie fishwife, Mary Milne,
walked the route until she finally retired in the mid 1950s as the age of 73.

Source: The

Scotsman 4 July 2013