School of Social Sciences Annual Research Report 1 August 2010 31 July 2011

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School of Social Sciences Annual Research Report


1
st

August 2010


31
st

July 2011


2


Contents


Introduction

3

Reports from Discipline Areas



-

Economics

5

-

Philosophy

7

-

Politics

9

-

Social Anthropology

11

-

Social Statistics

14

-

Sociology

16

Reports
from Research Centres



-

Centre for Research on Socio
-
cultural Change

18

-

Institute for Political and Economic Governance

20

-

Institute for Social Change

22

-

Morgan Centre for the Study of Relationships and Personal Life

25

-

Manchester e
-
Research Centre

27

-

Other Research Centres associated with SoSS

29

Appendix 1: Research Awards from 01 August 2010


31 July 2011



Appendix 2: Simon and Hallsworth Visiting Professors and SoSS Small Grants







3


Introduction


This is the sixth Annual Research Report from the School of Social Sciences. It covers the period from
1 August 2010


31 July 2011. The report presents the very considerable research achievements of
the School and reports on significant developments in th
e last twelve months.

Research in the
School is conducted under the auspices of the 6 Discipline Areas
-

Economics, Philosophy, Politics,
Social Anthropology, Social Statistics and Sociology


as well as a portfolio of large and influential

research centres and n
etworks.

The report demonstrates the School’s important contribution to the
three central pillars of the University’s current research strategy.


Overview of the period (01 August 2010


31 July 2011)


The School continued to be act
ive in research income generation. A total of 48 grants were awarded
to the school during the period of the report with a value of £
5,011,619,

a considerable achievemen
t
in the current
climate. These were secured from a range of funding sources including
the ESRC,
EPSRC, AHRC, MRC, British Academy, Leverhulme Trust and the EU. Large successful bids included:




£600,000 from the EPSRC to Dr Niamh Moore and Dr Andy Miles in CRESC for a project on
“Sust
ainable Transport Evidence and M
odelling Paradigms: Cohort

Household Analysis to
support New Goals in Engineering Design (STEP
-
CHANGE)”;



£1.7 million award from MRC (of which £1.3 million was credited to SoSS) for Professor
James Nazroo

(Social Statistics Discipline Area)

and colleagues Tarani Chandola and Gindo
Tampubolon, to look at, “Inequalities in later life frailty and wellbeing: an interdisciplinary
approach to causality”;



An ESRC award to Professor James Nazroo

to study
“The ethnic density effect on the health
of ethnic minority people in the United Kingdo
m: a study of hypothesised pathways”
, worth
£148,000
;



A Leverhulme Research Grant award to Profes
sor Pete Wade in Anthropology to study
“Public e
ngagement with genomic research and race in Latin America”
, worth £250,000
;



An ESRC award
of £161,000
to Profes
sor Anthony Heath
in Politics
for the British Electi
on
Study:
Ethnic Minority Survey;



An ESRC award
of £300,000
to Professor Carol Smart of the Morgan Centre for a project on
“Relative Strangers: Negotiating Non
-
Genetic Kinship in the Context of Assisted C
onception”.


Internally the School was also awarded five Visiting Professors
hips

from the University Simon and
Hallsworth endowments.


The School is supported by a School Research Office which provides a support service to staff in all
aspects of the
identification, formulation and preparation of bids for research funding, along with
follow up support for colleagues who are awarded funding. The School Research Office works with
the School Research Director (Professor Karen Sykes) to steer the School’s

research strategy. This
includes attending the regular meetings of the Faculty Strategic Research Committee and organising
the School Research Committee.


In
Spr
ing
2010 the School conducted an internal review of research, chaired by Professor Ron
Amann.

The review concluded that the School of Social Sciences had made significant progr
ess since
the last

research review in 2006 and continues in an upward trajectory. The school is currently
addressing
the action points raised during this review within each

discipline area. Preparations are
also underway
for the Research Excellence Framework
,

with the
identification,
development
and

4

review
of pilot impact case
studies, the drafting of environment statements, participation in the
University’s REF Profiling E
xercise, and an internal REF timeline in place.


The following sections contain a summary of the key achievements during the last twelve months
and a description of the strategy for the coming year for each of the Discipline Areas/major research
centres.
Further detailed information on the academic staff within each discipline area, their areas
of interest and their recent publications can be found on the SoSS Website at:


h
ttp://www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/disciplines/index.html



5


Economics


Research Highlights


The DA continues to enhance its international reputation and is well established as one of the
leading Economics departments in the UK
. Recent staff developments include Professor Nicholas
Yannelis moving from a part
-
time to a full
-
time post in Manchester and Professor Pierre
-
Richard
Agénor returning to his full
-
time post here after a period working part
-
time on a World Bank project
for
Burundi. Professor Rachel Griffith is a member of the Economics and Econometrics sub
-
panel for
REF2014, while Professor
James Banks was a member of the US National Academy of Science Panel
for the report “Explaining Divergent Levels of Longevity in High
-
In
come Countries” (January 2011)
and also of the academic advisory panel for the Dilnot Commission on Funding of Social Care and
Support, whose report “Fairer Care Funding” was published in July 2011. Vi
sitors have included
Professor Edward Prescott, who was

awarded the Nobel Prize in 2004, while a lively series of
Manchester Economics Seminars saw (among others) presentations from Paul Fisher (Executive
Director for Markets at the Bank of England), Professor Sir David Hendry (Oxford University) and
Diane Coy
le (Managing Director of Enlightenment Economics).

Economics at the University of Manchester has strength in all core areas of the discipline,
with research organised through five Research Area Groups (RAGs). Members of the
Macroeconomics Growth and Devel
opment RAG continue to examine key issues related to growth,
development, business cycles and macroeconomic policy. This work is both theoretical and empirical,
using modern techniques of analytical and econometric investigation to study important issues o
f
interest to both academics and policy makers, including: institutions, governance and corruption;
innovation, public capital and human capital; foreign aid and international economics; financial
markets, bankruptcy and regulation; imperfect competition a
nd nominal rigidities; monetary and
fiscal policy; inflation and unemployment; expectations, learning and agent heterogeneity. Work
over the last year has been published in many high
-
quality journals, including:
Journal of Economic
Dynamics and Control
;
Ma
croeconomic Dynamics
;
Journal of Banking and Finance
;
Journal of
International Money and Finance
;
Journal of Development Economics
;
Economica
;
Economics Letters
.

Research undertaken within the Microeconomics and Mathematical Economics RAG is
generally of a

technical nature, with some being at the boundaries of economics with mathematics
and/or finance. Topics covered range from the fundamentals of individual decision making and the
operation of markets to applications in financial economics, industrial orga
nisation, public
economics and social choice. Publications over the period include
Proceedings of the American
Mathematical Society;

Journal of Mathematical Economics; Economic Theory;

Journal of Risk and
Uncertainty; Theory and Decision
.;
BE Journal of
Theoretical Economics
.


Financial econometrics continues to be a growing strength within the Econometrics and
Applied Economics RAG, with members of the group
organising an international workshop held in
Berlin in May 2011. Work on structural breaks contin
ues to be funded by an ESRC grant (Hall and
Osborn), while research funded by National Institute for Health Research investigates the use of
moment
-
based methods, e.g., generalized empirical likelihood, for estimation of health economic
models (Andrews and

Hall with Sutton from Community Based Medicine). Research carried out
within the group ranges from applied microeconomic analysis of consumer choice to theoretical
econometrics. Journal publications over the last year include
Economic Journal; Journal of
Econometrics; Econometric Reviews; Econometric Theory; Journal of Empirical Finance
.


The Environmental and Resource Economics RAG has close links with the University’s
Sustainable Consumption Institute (SCI), under whose funding Dr Luca Panzone was appointed to a
research post in the DA from January 2011. The group also welcomed Dr Prasenj
it Banerjee to the
academic staff from August 2010. Joint research involving a number of RAG members, together with
other Manchester University staff from the DA and beyond, is a feature of work in this area.
Rigby,

6

Kortelainen and Wossink participate in t
he SCI flagship project
Sustainable Consumption and
Lifestyles
, which has contributions from Sociology, Economics and Psychology and involves several
postdoctoral researchers.
Sauer is as an ESRC Placement Fellow at DEFRA and a work task leader
under the E
U Genesis FP7 project. Publications include
Journal of Environmental Economics and
Management; Journal of Productivity Analysis; Journal of the Operational Research Society; Journal
of Agricultural Economics.


The Development Economics and Policy RAG also

has strong links outside the School of
Social Sciences, and interacts with both the Institute for Development Policy and Management
(School of Environment and Development) and the Brooks World Poverty Institute. Research by
RAG
members extends from microe
conomic analysis of poverty and well
-
being to the international
macroeconomics of structural change and development, often taking a policy perspective. For
example, Imai’s ESRC project on rural poverty in India is investigating the causes of malnutrition.
Alongside articles in international journals (including
Oxford Development Studies, World
Development

and
Cambridge Journal of Economics
), staff in this area made important contributions
through books and book chapters
. Members of the group, together with
colleagues in IDPM,
organized a major workshop focusing on national competitiveness in May 2011; a special journal
issue based on this workshop is currently in preparation.


In addition to the above, a small number of staff maintain strong research profile
s in areas
such as the history of economic thought, while other research crosses RAGs. The Centre for Growth
and Business Cycle Research is based in the DA and held its tenth biannual conference in June/July
2011. Staff are also involved in the organisatio
n of major international conferences (including the
2011 Royal Economic Society conference, for which Griffith was chair) and many staff are engaged in
editorial roles for major international journals, including Professor Rachel Griffith as managing editor

of the
Economic Journal
, Professor Anne Villamil as managing editor of the
Annals of Finance

and
Professor Nicholas Yannelis as managing editor of
Economic Theory
.
The Manchester School

continues to be edited from the DA by a team led by Professor Chris O
rme.


Research Strategy 2011
-
12


The DA continues to be committed to support high quality research in both theory and applications
of Economics. Therefore, we will maintain and (where possible) enhance our strength in the core
areas of the discipline
(macroeconomics, microeconomics and econometrics) while also promoting
interdisciplinary research, particularly in environmental economics, development economics and
health economics. Our commitment to the future extends to research training, where the DA
has
this year embarked on a four year doctoral training programme, with dedicated PhD
-
level courses
provided by all five RAGs and substantial funds invested in scholarships for high quality students.


7



Philosophy


Research Highlights


The Philosophy Disci
pline Area continues to go from strength to strength within its areas of research
expertise: metaphysics and the philosophy of language; aesthetics and the emotions; and
environmental policy and moral motivation. The DA’s overall research strategy stresses

the
importance of: publishing in top quality journals and presses; attracting external research income;
raising the profile of philosophy at Manchester by hosting conferences; and enhancing the quality of
our PhD students. Substantial progress has been ma
de on all of these fronts.


Publications

The Philosophy DA’s publication strategy is to concentrate on quality rather than quantity:
i.e.
to
place articles in journals of the highest quality, and to publish books with prestigious presses. Here
are some of the year’s highlights:



Catharine Abell and Katerina Bantinaki (eds.),
Philosophical Perspectives on Depiction

(Oxford: Oxford University
Press, 2010).



Chris Daly,
An Introduction to Philosophical Methods

(Buffalo, New York: Broadview Press,
2010).



Chris Daly and David Liggins,
‘Deferentialism’, forthcoming in
Philosophical Studies
,
(published online in 2010).



Julian Dodd, “Confessions of an unrepentant timbral sonicist’,
British Journal of Aesthetics

50
(2010): 33
-
52.



Peter Goldie (ed.),
The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion

(Oxford: Oxford
University Press, 2010).



Peter Goldie, ‘Grief: a narrative accou
nt’,
Ratio
24 (2011): 119
-
137.



David Liggins, ‘The autism objection to pretence theories’,
Philosophical Quarterly
60 (2010):
764

782.



John O’Neill, ‘The Political Economy of Recognition’,
The Adam Smith Review

6 (2011): 164
-
186
.



Michael Scott,
Reading Phi
losophy of Religion,
with Graham Oppy, (Oxford: Wiley
-
Blackwell,
2010).



Joel Smith, ‘Seeing other people’,
Philosophy and Phenomenological Research

81 (2010):
731
-
748.



Joel Smith, ‘The conceptual problem of other bodies’,
Proceedings of the Aristotelian So
ciety

110 (2010): 201
-
217.



Thomas Smith,
‘Playing one’s part’, forthcoming in
Review of Philosophy and Psychology
2
(2011).



Graham Stevens,
‘Russell’s ontological development reconsidered’,
British Journal for the
History of Philosophy

18 (2010): 113
-
137.



Ann Whittle, ‘
Dispositional abilities’,
The Philosopher’s Imprint
10 (2010): 1
-
23.


International recognition of research excellence in aesthetics

In the hugely influential Philosophical Gourmet Report, co
-
ordinated by Brian Leiter, The University
of Manc
hester is Group 2 rated (and the joint top
-
rated UK department) for the Philosophy of Art.
For further details, see:


http://www.philosophicalgourmet.com/breakdown.asp



8

Research grant succes
s

In 2010
-
11 the Philosophy DA

submitted more grant applications than ever before. Three were
successful:



Michael Scott and John O’Neill (with Ada Wossink and Geoff Beattie),
Motivational strength
of ecosystem services and alternative ways to express the
value of Biodiversity

(
BIOMOT),

European Commission FP7
-
ENV
-
2011: 2011
-
2015 (€490,000).



John O’Neill,
Climate change, insurance and social justice
, Joseph Rowntree Foundation:
2011 (£7462).



Ann Whittle,
Substance causation and agent causation
, AHRC Early
Career Research Scheme:
2011
-
12 (£13000).


Successful hosting of conferences

Organizing international conferences and workshops in our areas of expertise remains a core
element of the Philosophy DA’s research strategy. Such activity both raises awareness o
f work done
within the DA and provides a spur for the production of further such work. This year’s highlights
included
Perceiving Others’ Minds
(July, 2011),
Fictionalism in the Philosophy of Mathematics
(June,
2011),
Emotion: Phenomenology and Content

(Ma
y, 2011); and the sixth iteration of our annual
graduate conference,
Open Minds
(June, 2011).


PhD Students

The quality of the DA’s PhD students continues to improve. This is evidenced by two facts. First,
Manchester PhDs are now beginning to secure post
-
doctoral positions in philosophy: Chloe
Fitzgerald (PhD, 2010), for example, now holds such a post at the University of Toronto. Second,
Manchester PhD students are increasingly publishing in international, refereed journals. Here are
two such recent succe
sses:



Michael Clark, ‘Inclusionism and the problem of unmarried husbands’, forthcoming in
Erkenntnis
.



Philip Brown (with Michael Scott), ‘Pragmatic anti
-
realism’, forthcoming in
Philosophical
Studies
.

We advise our PhD students to try to publish in high
-
qu
ality journals, again arguing that a ‘quality,
not quantity’ approach to publication will leave them best placed to secure post
-
doctoral posts.
Clearly, this policy is beginning to bear fruit.


9



Politics


Research Highlights


The main focus for the year was on developing our profile of research outputs across all areas of
research, reflecting the Politics research strategy and building towards a strong REF submission in
2013. Research grant applications were encouraged, and we

began the tracking and documentation
of the wider impact of research in Politics. It is pleasing to note that members of the DA have won a
number of research related awards and honours in the year:
Claire Annesley

was awarded the
Political Studies Assoc
iation's Richard Rose Prize for 2011 awarded to a younger scholar who has
made a distinctive contribution to the study of British Politics;
Rosaleen Duffy

was awarded a
University Distinguished Achievement Medal as Researcher of the Year 2011;
Karen Clarke

was
awarded a prize by the journal
Critical Policy Studies

for her paper “
From 'cycles of disadvantage' to
Sure Start: discourses of early intervention in families” judged to be one of the three best papers
published in the journal over the period from 20
07; a
nd
Alan Hamlin

and
Peter John

were elected
as Academicians of the Academy of Social Sciences.

Members of the DA published a number of major books in the year including:
Barabantseva, E.
(2010)

Overseas Chinese, Ethnic Minorities and Nationalism: De
-
centering China,

Routledge;
Callahan, W. A.
(2010) China:

The Pessoptimist Nation,

Oxford University Press;
Duffy, R
.
(2010)

Nature Crime: How We're Getting Conservation Wrong
, Yale University Press;
Macartney, H.
(2010)
Variegated Neoliberalism: EU varieties of capitalism and international political economy,
Routledge;
Papadimitriou, D
. Featherstone, K., Mamarelis, A. and Niarchos, G. (2010)
The Last
Ottomans. New Perspective
s on Southeast Europe
, Palgrave; Payne, A. and
N. Phillips

(2010)
Development
, Polity Press;
Quong, J.

(2010)
Liberalism Without Perfection,

Oxford University Press;
Humphreys, P
and T. Gibbons, (2011)
Audiovisual Regulation under Pressure: Comparative Ca
ses
from North America and Europe
, Routledge;
Masters, C
.
(2011)

Militarism, Gender and (In)Security:
Biopolitical Technologies of Security and the War on Terror,
Routledge; and
Parmar, I.

(2011)

Foundations of the American Century: Ford, Carnegie and Roc
kefeller Foundations and US
Foreign Affairs, 1917
-
2005
, Columbia University Press. Colleagues also published in the leading
international journals across the range of politics with articles in, for example:
British Journal of
Political Science;

Comparativ
e Political Studies; European Journal of Political Research; European
Journal of International Relations; Government and Opposition; History of Political Thought;
International Politics; Journal of Political Philosophy;

Journal of Politics;
Political Stu
dies;


Politics,
Philosophy and Economics;

and
Public Administration
among many others
.

Given that the DA’s is
characterised by a significant number of early career researchers, it is particularly pleasing to note
the quality and range of publications associated with younger colleagues. For further details of
recent and forthcoming publicati
ons see:


http://www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/disciplines/politics/publications/recent/index.html


Research in Politics has substantial im
pact beyond academia. In preparation for REF the DA
is developing impact case studies relating to work in the areas of Local Government, Electoral
Politics, Political Communication, China and Asia, Global Political Economy and Gender.

In a difficult envi
ronment, members of the DA have been active in applying for external
research funds and there have been notable successes:
Jonathan Quong

has spent 2010
-
11 as a
Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Fellow at Princeton University’s Center for Human Values;
I
nderjeet
Parmar

has been awarded an AHRC Research Networking grant for a project on The Presidency of
Barack Obama;
Angelia Wilson

has been awarded a Leverhulme Research Fellowship on the topic of
‘Constructing social values as a political strategy: what
are the strategies and mechanisms by which

10

the US Christian right builds political constituencies?’ and
Jane Green
has secured a three
-
year
research fellowship in the Institute for Social Change.
William Callahan,

Rachel Gibson
,
James
Pattison

Nicola Phill
ips
and
Rorden Wilkinson

all continue on their externally funded research
projects.

Members of Politics were active in giving papers at a wide range of international
conferences and seminars and individuals and research clusters within the DA organised a
number of
conferences, seminars and workshops, some in collaboration with wider research groups and
networks.
MANCEPT
, the political theory cluster, organised a regular seminar series and two
international conferences, one on ‘Problems of Priority’ (Nov 20
10) and one on ‘Conscience’ (May
2011), and the annual ‘Brave New World’ conference for PhD students. The
Global Political
Economy

cluster organised an international conference ‘Beyond Neoliberalism’ (June 2011), a
workshop featuring the work of Paul Langl
ey (May 2011), a workshop featuring the work of Nicola
Phillips and Huw Macartney (Dec 2010) and a series of seminars featuring PhD students. The
Comparative Public Policy

cluster ran a regular seminar series, co
-
sponsored (with JMCE) two
workshops on '1
0 Years of the EU's Lisbon Agenda' (May 2011), and a symposium on ‘Gender and
the Core Executive (Jan 2011). The
Poststructural and Critical Thought

cluster co
-
sponsored (with
HCRI) a workshop on ‘Are soldiers human?’ (Sept 2010), and hosted a BISA confere
nce on ‘Teaching
and Researching Terrorism’ (Sept 2010). The

Electoral Politics
cluster organised a seminar on the AV
debate (May 2011), and contributed to a symposium on methods and the British Election Study,
(
May 2011).
The
Gender Research Network
organ
ised a

seminar on ‘Feminist Action in Turbulent
Times’ celebrating the contributions of Karen Clarke and Jill Lovecy (June 2011). The
Centre for
Chinese Studies

organised

an international conference on ‘China’s Futures


and the World’s Future’
(Feb 2011). The annual
Peace Lecture was given by
A
idan McQuade,
Director of Anti
-
Slavery
International (May 2011).


Research Strategy 2011
-
12


The Politics strategy was reset in 20
09/10 and we are now in a period of implementation which will
also ensure appropriate preparation for REF2014. The year ahead will be challenging, but we have
established a strong base of research activity across a substantive and methodological range, an
d a
clear focus on quality that is supported by our internal Peer Review Network. Each of the research
clusters will continue to develop its contribution to the research environment, including the support
of PhD students. The newly established North West D
octoral Training Centre provides a new
opportunity for developing research links with colleagues at Liverpool and Lancaster as well as
offering enhanced opportunities to our PhD students.


11


Social Anthropology


Research Highlights


It was a lively year
for S
ocial Anthropology

at Manchester with staff successful in major funding bids,
publishing widely and maintaining a vibrant research culture including the development and
consolidation of interdisciplinary links between SA and other school DAs and beyon
d. Staff played a
major role in major international research networks (Green and Eastbord) and various research
centres (with Harvey, for example, as Co
-
director of CRESC and Glick
-
Schiller as Co
-
director of RICC
and contributing to the Cities initiative s
upported by the Faculty of Humanities). This year has also
seen the consolidation of collaborative links between social anthropologists and scholars across the
university (for example, Henley, and Torresan with the Centre for Applied Theatre and Screen
Stu
dies; Macdonald and Fairweather with the Manchester Museum; M. Green with Life Sciences;
and Cox with the Whitworth Art Gallery). There was active attendance by staff at major international
conferences and a high number of invitations to give keynote or pl
enary lectures. Both Macdonald
and Henley were invited as visiting professors to China, Macdonald to Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
which has identified anthropology as its new priority for development in the humanities and Henley
to the Sun YatSen Univers
ity in Guangzhou which is developing a visual anthropology programme.

Social Anthropology
were successful in attracting PG funding from ORS, ESRC and SOSS. Two
excellent candidates were awarded ESRC funding through the Social Anthropology Pathway of the
n
ew North West Doctoral Training Centre. Two other candidates, who would have been co
-
supervised in SA, were awarded grants through the Language
-
Based Areas Studies Pathway of the
NWDTC, but they declined their awards for personal reasons. However, an anthr
opology student
based at Liverpool and funded by the LBAS pathway, will be co
-
supervised in SA. The DTC will give SA
the opportunity to collaborate with both Liverpool and Lancaster in PGR training.


The weekly Monday seminar continued to thrive with a ful
l programme of guest speakers
from major anthropology departments in the UK and beyond and it continued to attract capacity
audiences of both PGs and academic staff. There was a very successful summer school in visual
anthropology which attracted a wide r
ange of highly satisfied participants from across the UK and
beyond. The annual GD
AT debate was well attended and

feedback from GDAT this year suggests
that i
t has become a key and popular
fixture on the anthropological circuit.

Manchester social
anthropologists began or consolidated major international collaborations
during this period. Sarah Green continued her work as coordinator and chair of EastBordNet, a
COST
-
European Science Foundation funded international research network of twenty five cou
ntries,
and as Executive Programme Chair of the American Anthropological Association meetings to be held
in Montreal in 2011. John Gledhill was elected as Fellow of the British Academy and continued his

ethnographic research in Mexico and Brazil under the
auspices of a Leverhulme Major Research
Fellowship. Karen Sykes, in collaboration with Chris Gregory (Manchester/ANU) and Fiona
McGowan (QUB), launched her major ESRC funded project with a lively and over
-
subscribed one day
colloquium entitled ‘The value

question today: interdisciplinary perspectives on the moral economy’
which included invited speakers from Europe, USA and Australia. This project also provides funding
for three doctoral students adding to the strong and vibrant PhD community within socia
l
anthropology. Penny Harvey continued her collaboration with
Profe
ssor Deborah Poole of The John
Hopkins University and also continued ethnographic research in Peru funded jointly by the AHRC and
NSF.
Andrew Irving was awarded a research grant
from the
British Academy to further his research
(previously funded by Wenner Gren Foundation) for research with AIDs sufferers in New York: ‘Life
Journey’s 2’. Sharon Macdonald was awarded a Leverhulme Trust Fellowship for preliminary
research in China on the exhi
bition of minority cultural heritage and also secured funding for an ESF
researc
h conference which was held in
July 2011.
Peter Wade
was also funded by the Leverhulme
Trust to extend his project 'Race, Genomics and Mestizaje in Latin America: A Comparative


12

Approach' which began in January 2010 (funded by

the ESRC)

into phase two: ‘Public engagement
with genomic research and race in Latin America’. Th
e final conference for phase 1
was held in
Manchester in July 2011 and included collaborators from Brazil, Me
xico and Colombia and
internationally renowned discussants from Europe and the US. The Leverhulme
funding continues
the support of

three post doctoral researchers which again contributes to the vibrant research
culture of SA at Manchester.

Rupert Cox secu
red funding from the Wellcome Trust for ‘Air
Pressure’, an exhibition which is part of
Asia Triennial Manchester 11,
and from SoSS to take it to
Japan. Adi Kuntsman was awarded a Simon Fellowship
and anthropologists secured a number of
other small grants

during the year for travel and conference attendance.

Postgraduate students were supported in their organisation of workshops, mini
-
conferences
and 'master classes' with visiting scholars. The work of several of our PG students was recognised
this year:
A
inhoa Montoya received an Honorable Mention in the Association of Political and Legal
Anthropolog
ists student prize submissions
for her essay ‘The Politics of Fear and the Shadow State in
Post
-
War El Salvado
r’ and Martha Cecilia Dietrich was awarded a Univ
ersity of
Manchester Alumni
Scholarship for her project ‘Sensing prison: the bodily and imaginative aspects of imprisonment
among female ex
-
combatants in Peru’.
Andy Lawrence’s recently completed film was screened at
various international festivals and awa
rded a prize at the Royal Anthropological Institute Film
Festival.

Dipesh Chakra
barty (Chicago) and Jon Altman
(ANU) came to Manches
ter this year with the
support
of Hallsworth Visiting Professorships.

Their

visits included public l
ectures, departmental
s
eminars
and ‘master classes’ for PGR students.

Itsushi Kawase, as Visiting Fellow of the Granada
Centre, and on postdoctoral fellowship funded by the Japan Society for the Advancement of Science,
continued his research into ethnomusicology and possession rites in Ethiopia. While the fellowship
of Xu Ha
n, of the University of Yunnan, China, funded by the Yunnan regional government to
research Western approaches to ethnographic documentary, came to an end in January.

Eme
ritus
Professor, Richard Werbner, was successful in getting funding to carry out furt
her fieldwork in
Botswana and has subsequently been awarded a Fellowship at the National Humanities Centre, in
North Carolina.
Other visiting scholars this year have included Vanessa Maher, Smadar Lavie and
Melinda Hinkson. Our bid for a Hallsworth Visitin
g Professor for next year has also been successful
and we are pleased that Professor Steven Robins from the University of Stellenbosch, South Africa
has accepted our invitation and wil
l

be with us for two months in spring 2012.

Publications were healthy

during this period. Staff focused their efforts on internationally
recognised journals and there were publications in key anthropological journals. Several full
monographs were also published this year (Macdonald, Glick
-
Schiller, Wade) with a number now

in
press (Obeid, Martin, Smith, Venkatesan, Reeves, Evans) and with staff also editing books and special
editions of journals (Edwards, Harvey, Irving, Cox). Social anthropologists were also publishing in
popular media such as Wire (Cox) and contributing
to radio and media debate (Evans, Reeves).

In a Research Away Day at the beginning of the academic year, we started preparation for
REF, first by looking at research and publication profiles and second by identifying and developing
impact case studies. Th
is work will continue over the coming year with a view to supporting the
research aspirations of individual memb
ers of staff, while developing
a coherent strategy for REF
2014.


Research Strategy 2011
-
12


We will focus on five key areas this year:


1. Con
tinue to increase publications in internationally recognised journals without compromising the
value placed on the ethnographic monograph by the discipline, and without curtailing too drastically
the possibility of placing articles in volumes that stem fro
m collectivities and/or commitments
stemming from collaborative work.


13

2. Continue REF preparation through supporting staff publication plans as

well developing and
working up

‘impact’ case studies, without stunting the creative and innovative ideas of sta
ff that do
not, at first glance, look REFable.

3. Continue working on means to find alternative funding for doctoral candidates, given the drop in
funding for qualitative social science research.

4. To rework and develop key research t
hemes that

can be ide
ntified with current anthropology at
Manchester.

5. To look beyond 'traditional' funders of anthropological research to develop strategies of
supporting proposals to the EU or ERC, for example.


14


Social Statistics/CCSR


Research Highlights


Social
Statistics is a discipline that makes important contributions to research in many other
disciplines, most notably sociology, psychology, geography, politics and social policy. The fact that all
these disciplines are, to an extent, represented in the DA and

that DA staff members have strong
research links across the faculty and beyond, means that we avoid the risk of being self
-
contained
and inward
-
looking.

The Social Statistics discipline area is one of three statistics groupings in the
university and we ha
ve good links to our colleagues in the Schools of Mathematics and Medicine.

We can partition our research activities into three broad but interlocking areas each containing
a number of themes. These areas are, in no particular order:


1.

Advanced quantitativ
e methods.

2.

Inequalities.

3.

Social dynamics.


The two data development and support services, ESDS Government and the Samples of
Anonymised Records (SARs) both have 5
-
year ESRC funding and will continue to play a core role
within the DA. The location of ESDS
within the DA provides a valuable basis for developing methods
-
related resources and workshops on, for example, complex survey design. Methodological
developments related to the Census have long played a central theme in our research and are
evident throug
h the work done to develop a specification for SARs for 2011 (led by Fieldhouse and
Wathan); work to assess disclosure risk from tabular or microdata (Elliot, Purdam)


now being
extended by Elliot’s role with the new ESRC
-
funded Administrative Data Liaiso
n Service; and work on
census quality (including the review led by Plewis and including Ludi Simpson to assess the quality of
the 2011 Census).

Publication highlights include books by Mark Elliot (Statistical Confidentiality) and Angela Dale
(Social Resear
ch Methods), a report on Stress at Work (Tarani Chandola) which received wide
publicity, and on methodolo
gical issues linked to the 2011
Census (Ian Plewis); journal articles in the
areas of (i) health inequalities, health and ageing; (ii) health and educa
tion and ethnicity from Tarani
Chandola, James Nazroo, Laia Becares, Nissa Finney and Ian Plewis; (iii) social networks from Johan
Koskinen and Mark Tranmer; (iv) comparative analysis of part
-
time employment and marital stability
from Vanessa Gash; and a c
hapter on missing data in longitudinal studies from Ian Plewis.

New grants obtained during the period include £1.8m on ageing and inequality from Lifelong
Health and Wellbeing Cross
-
Council Programme to James Nazroo and Tarani Chandola, and an
NCRM Network

for Methodological Innovation on the methodological challenges facing ageing
cohort studies to Tarani Chandola.

Meetings have been held under the auspices of a seminar series funded by the ESRC/NCRM
Network for Methodological Innovation on methodological
innovation and capacity building in
ethnicity research to a team including Angela Dale and James Nazroo.


Research Strategy 2011
-
12


Our research strategy is rooted in our current activities and extant research groups but not entirely
determined by them.
The opportunities for carrying out research for which Social Statistics and CCSR
are renowned can be expected to grow, given the substantial investment by ESRC and others in the
collection and dissemination of large and complex longitudinal datasets


the
current birth cohort
studies, augmented by a new national cohort starting in 2012; Understanding Society; government
surveys such as the Longitudinal Survey of Young People in England; and administrative data such as

15

the National Pupil Database. It is the
existence and potential of these resources, allied to our
broadly
-
based understanding of the ideas that drive social science in general, that will enable us to
generate further interesting methodological and substantive projects. Nevertheless, we recognise

that these plans are subject to modification in the light of the prevailing research and funding
culture.




16


Sociology


Research Highlights


Research groups and staff members in the DA continue to maintain Manchester Sociology’s
reputation as a (i) key centre of mixed methods and methodological innovation and (ii) as a centre of
research excellence in the areas of social ties, social movements
and social networks;
cultural
practices, consumption and sustainability; social divisions, inequalities and culture
; and personal life
and everyday lives, with a steady stream of research grants and indicators of esteem. Senior
members of the DA continue
to attract national and international esteem (eg, Warde) and it is
pleasing to note the success of more junior members of staff in gaining research grants and
indicators of esteem (eg, Gillan, Nimmo). Highlights during the period include:




Professor Alan
Warde has been appointed as member of the Sociology Panel of the Research
Excellence Framework.



Professor Dame Janet Finch has joined the
Morgan Centre

as

Honorary Professor. Dame
Janet is Chair of the Research Excellence Framework review Panel C.



Richie
Nimmo has been awarded the Animals and Society Institute’s Human
-
Animal Studies
Fellowship for 2011.



Carol Smart (PI) and Petra Nordqvist (CI) have been awarded an ESRC grant for the ‘Relative
Strangers’ project on assisted conception (£300,000 for 30 mont
hs). Petra Nordqvist has
been appointed RA on the project
(associated with the
Morgan Centre
).



Colette Fagan (PI) has an ILO grant for ‘Working time and work life balance’ and an ongoing
ESRC Seminar Series grant (£17,000) ‘Fairness at Work’ (2009
-
11).



The

Sustainable Practices Research Group
, funded by the ESRC, DEFRA & Scottish
Government, has an ongoing large research grant: an SCI funded research project (£785,000
for 24 months) Modelling Consumer Behaviour; which will further establish Manchester
Socio
logy’s profile as a centre for research in sustainable consumption.
The Sustainable
Practices Research Group was also appointed to the UK’s ‘Living with Environmental Change’
Programme



Kevin Gillan (PI) has an ongoing ESRC First Grant (£195,000) for the pr
oject ‘Making
Corporations Moral: Routes of Influence on Corporate Behaviour’, from Jan 2010
-
Jan 2013.




Bridge Byrne has as ongoing Leverhulme Fellowship for 'Citizenship ceremonies: narrations
of nation' (£44,754).



Brian Heaphy (PI) has on ongoing ESRC gr
ant (£391,343) for project ‘Just Like Marriage?
Young same
-
sex couples’ civil partnership’ (associated with the
Morgan Centre
).



James Nazroo (PI) has an ongoing ESRC grant (£148,413) ‘The ethnic density effect on the
health of ethnic minority people in the

UK’



Nick Crossley was appointed as
academic advisor to the 'Security and Identity' section of the
'Economics and Resource Analysis' section of the Home Office. Nick Crossley
has an ongoing
EPSRC grant on 'Social Complexity of Immigration and Diversity' (
project based in ISC).



MeRC
has an ongoing National Institute for Health Research Grant: (£430K, October 2009
-
September 2012) for the project ‘Successful Technology Adoption in the NHS’ (Procter, CI).
Rob Procter (PI) was awarded an EPSRC grant (£48,716) f
or ‘Exploiting a computer
-
based
learning environment to meet training needs in mammography’ (Jan 2011).



The
Morgan Centre

hosts a second international conference,
Proximities
, in September
2011.



Professor Sue Heath has joined the Morgan Centre as Director.


17



Two new lecturers, James Rhodes and David Evans, have been appointed whose research
expertise will contribute to the research clusters of cultural practices, consumption and
sustainability; and social divisions, inequalities and culture.



The
(In)Equalitie
s Research Group

has been launched, building on the existing strengths and
refocusing the
social divisions, inequalities and culture cluster
.



18


SoSS Research Centres


Centre for Research on Socio
-
Cultural Change (CRESC)


CRESC maintained a core focus on
socio
-
cultural change in the context of socio
-
technical innovation,
economic insecurity and cultural diversity, and sought to foster inter
-
disciplinary dialogue on
changes that characterise the specific and diverse manifestations of contemporary global cap
italism.
Over the past year we have increasingly worked across our research clusters to develop new
theoretical and methodological approaches. We have created and started to organise our work
around a series of key social scie
nce questions
. Our integrativ
e research focus, the Social Life of
Methods, has successfully synthesised CRESC research and fostered engagement with our work. We
have now created a second integrative research focus, Urban Experiments, to draw together CRESC
work on urban cultures, mate
rialities and mobilities, and develop our relations with other UK and
international research centres. The Governing Cultures theme has been discontinued with
museology projects moved to the Participation and Inequality Theme, enhancing the focus of that
gr
oup on the cultural sector. Finally, our new web
-
site highlights scientific progress and encourages
engagement by emphasising impacts, including press reports, a blog, and CRESC news with economic
and social implications.


Impacts and Highlights


The
Impact of the Digita
l: The digital has a double impact on the social, directly configuring it, but
also reconfiguring understandings of what counts as ‘the social’. Our work has explored digital
devices both generally (Ruppert, Law and Savage), and in spe
cific areas: digital urban modelling as a
mode of engaging publics in planned urban social change (Knox); the use of Web 2.0 transactional
data devices (Savage and Ruppert); digitized government administrative databases for tracing and
tracking populations

(Ruppert); and the integration of commercial and government databases on
household expenditure (Montgomerie). We have also explored ‘digital turmoil’ given the regulatory
and governmental challenges faced by international efforts to move broadcasting and
communications from analogue systems.


Mobility, Public Space and Moral Borders
: Borders, boundaries and edges may be understood as
important conceptual and empirical sites for investigating social transformation. Our research has
focused on how borders o
perate as divisions, leaky boundaries, and indeterminate spaces, creating
conditions for the institution of legality whilst at the same time producing continual possibilities for
transgression. Green and her COST network play a key role in our research on
borders which have
been explored comparatively and internationally in relation to financial relations (Erturk),
infrastructural investments, and the reconfiguration of public domains in marginal or transitional
spaces such as airports (O’Doherty), roads (H
arvey) and sites of shifting allegiance between and
within national states (Evans, Reeves)


Knowledge Limits
: CRESC work on the financial crisis has highlighted knowledge limits which figured
prominently at the April 2010 CRESC conference on Finance in Que
stion/Finance in Crisis. Pryke is
editing a themed section of The Journal of Cultural Economy on proposals for remap
ping the
financial sector; and
Williams and Montgomerie have submitted a special section of Economy and
Society on knowledge limits and fin
ancial crisis with papers by Dorn, Mackenzie and Mirowski and a
contribution on mis
-
rule by experts from an interdisciplinary CRESC team including Moran and
Williams, who have developed this argument in their forthcoming jointly authored OUP book, After
th
e Great Complacence, on the undisclosed in financial innovation and the consequent difficulties of
re
-
regulation. In a different way, the theme of knowledge limits is also taken up by researchers

19

exploring the role of expert knowledge in state
-
driven infra
structural projects in the UK (Evans) and
overseas (Harvey, Reeves).


Urban Experiments
: Cities research has been a key area of activity across CRESC, and an important
focus for our interests in social change given that more than half the world lives in ci
ties, and all are
affected by urban processes. Watson (with Bridge) has edited the multidisciplinary Blackwell New
Companion to the City (65 chapters), with contributions from 10 CRESC members. This cutting edge
volume was launched in March 2011, at CRESC’
s annual lecture by Andrew Ross, ‘Is urban
sustainability possible in the age of climate justice?’ The links between CRESC research and urban
studies in the UK and internationally has also been strengthened by the lecture series organised by
Evans with the

Olympic Park Legacy Company. Cochrane and Ward's ‘Urban Assemblages’ workshop
with participants from the UK, US, and Europe (including Peck, Theodore and McCann) led to a
special issue of Environment and Planning on methodologies of researching urban mobi
lities. As part
of our new cross
-
cutting focus on cities we are also looking to connect a range of projects on
Manchester.


Banking and rebalancing the economy
: CRESC sustains two interrelated streams of high profile
research on banking reform and on the n
ational business model, job creation and manufacturing.
We reach mass audiences by making or influencing programmes and outputs. In 2010 we were
credited as consultants on a Channel 4 documentary, How the Banks Won; working with journalists,
six CRESC rese
archers co
-
authored the eBook Britain’s Broken Economy; Erturk and Pryke worked
with NGOs on a Thomson Reuters video, The Politics of Alternative Finance, (distributed to 500,000).
CRESC also leads debate through public interest reports. Working Paper 78 o
n job creation was cited
by David Cameron in his first speech on the economy as Prime Minister. Our most recent report,
Working Paper 87, Rebalancing the Economy featured in the Guardian, and was the impetus for a
CRESC
-
organised meeting at the House of Co
mmons. Speakers included the Chief Executive of the
Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders, Brendan Barber (TUC) and John Denham from Labour
as well as CRESC’s Karel Williams.


The Cultural Sector
: CRESC has maintained a high profile through key strate
gic partnerships. Savage
designed the analysis of the BBC’s The Great British Class Survey, (the largest ever survey of social
class), and Miles is leading an AHRC Connected Communities development project on participation
and the creative economy. Miles’
report on his (2009) ESRC Placement Fellowship at the DCMS was
published and disseminated in sector
-
based knowledge transfer events. CRESC jointly hosted an
event to disseminate the findings of the DCMS’s prestigious CASE programme to a regional audience.
Miles and Gilmore wrote the research and evaluation strategy for ‘We Play’, the regional Cultural
Olympiad programme. Gillespie and colleagues have consolidated their work on transnational media
production and audiences through the ‘Tuning In’ project with

the award of an AHRC Public Policy
Fellowship on World Service public impact and capacity building, and ‘Tuning In’ was selected as an
AHRC Impact project. Collins has continued to act as Specialist Advisor to the House of Lords’
Communications Committee
inquiry into digital switch
-
over.


KPIs
W
e more than met both our quantitative and
qualitative KPIs for 2010
-
2011

with respect to
number of publications submitted (
62
/
25

core staff +
74
/
50

affiliate), additional grant income
(£881K,
19.27%/
6%

of award
value), events (
35
/
14
) and media reports (
57
/
20)
. This work was
produced in alignment with the six key qualitative indicators agreed with the ESRC to (i) publish in
leading social science and humanities journals (ii) demonstrate interdisciplinary collabora
tion among
core staff (iii) to show methodological innovation (iv) to publish collaborative work (cross
-
theme and
cross
-
institution) (v) demonstrate engagement and impact (vi) to sustain the CRESC J
ournal of
Cultural Economy
, and the CRESC Routledge book s
eries on
Culture, Economy and the Socia
l.



20

Staffing

We
look forward to working with Professor Fiona Devine as a new CRESC Director, and with
Professor Sarah Green, and Dr. Wendy Bottero as funded CRESC affiliates from September 2011.
With the exception o
f these two researchers we are moving away from a system of course buy
-
outs
for affiliate researchers and are focusing resources on strategic areas to best meet our research
objectives for the Centre as a whole over the next three years.


Forward Planning

In the context of CRESC Residential meetings, and in consultation with Schools, Faculties and
University management at both the OU and at Manchester, we continue our discussions of how to
address the important issues of the CRESC legacy (post 2014); of em
ployment possibilities (and
necessary range of skills and experience) for contract researchers; of future collaborations and
research networks
-

with other Centres, and other institutions and individuals not just in the UK but
also internationally.


Visit
the CRESC website at
http://www.cresc.ac.uk/



Institute for Political and Economic Governance (IPEG)


The Institute for Political and Economic Governance (IPEG) was established in late 2002 as a
primarily self
-
sustaining, multi
-
disciplinary research institute within the Faculty of Humanities.


IPEG
has an outward
-
facing profile and a mission to forge conne
ctions between research, policy and
practice by positioning itself at the interface between academic and policy/practitioner communities
on the contemporary research and policy issues in which its main expertise lies.


IPEG’s research to
date has been grou
ped around the core themes of:



Civic renewal & citizen behaviour change



Methods of public policy and public service reform



Innovative evaluation methods, e.g. Randomised Controlled Trials



Local governance reform, and



Urban
-
regional economic development.


In particular, it has developed innovative approaches to policy evaluation and development which
provide a focus for debate on a variety of public policy issues related to the general theme of
governance:


political, economic, international, national, re
gional, sub
-
regional and local.


By
nurturing a systematic dialogue with policy communities, IPEG seeks to ensure that its research
agenda is challenging but relevant to the needs of practitioners, providing a vital link between the
acquisition of knowledg
e and its transfer.


It provides a unique mixture of: work on economic and
political governance, use of innovative research methods; and, a commitment to applying
theoretical and conceptual tools to the development of the evidence base for policy
-
making.



IPEG
has conducted research for a number of government organisations and other public bodies,
including: Office of the Deputy Prime Minister, The Home Office, The Standards Board for England
and Liverpool City Council Core Cities Group to name a few.


Bey
ond its financial and scholarly success, IPEG provides significant added value to the Faculty
through:



Its high external credibility, visibility and profile


21



Its increasing success in galvanising and co
-
ordinating complex, interdisciplinary research
bids wi
th colleagues elsewhere in the Faculty and beyond in pursuit of opportunities which
would often be missed otherwise,



Preparing the ground for and leading Faculty initiatives, for example through its role in the
‘cities@manchester’ SRIF initiative, and



Prov
iding a platform and training ground for talented earlier career researchers

IPEG has developed productive working relationships with academic colleagues in most of other
main research centres within the Faculty (e.g. CRESC, CCSR, CUPS, MARC, CURE, ISC, RI
CC, MIoIR) in
subject area groups within SoSS, SED and MBS (e.g. Politics, Economics, Sociology, Geography,
Planning, Environment, Architecture) and at corporate level (e.g. with senior colleagues with
responsibility for innovation, economic development an
d regional affairs). IPEG also hosted external
visitors such as Hallsworth visiting fellow from other universities within the UK and Commonwealth
fellow from the West Indies. The strengths are set to become more important to the Faculty as the
HEFCE requir
ement to demonstrate impact from research undertaken in the Social Sciences and
Humanities becomes evermore important and as the need to raise research income from non
-
traditional sources becomes more pressing.

In terms of the quality, importance and impac
t of the research IPEG has undertaken, listed below are
some of the highlights in the period.

Examples of commissioned work for central government:



An evaluation of the Community Contracts pilot programme for CLG (published January 2010).



Production of
Community Contracts implementation guidance for CLG in 2010, jointly with the
research consultancy Shared Intelligence.



Literature review on pledging and pledgebanks (ways to increase civic activity) for CLG published
in September 2009.


Examples of projec
ts funded by Research Councils:



Two separate literature reviews funded by AHRC in 2011, under its Connected Communities
programme, focusing on community development, and the participation of communities in
research, in partnership with de Montfort
University.



Another highlight of IPEG’s success is the recently awarded joint ESRC project ‘Sustaining Growth
for innovative new enterprises’ in collaboration with Manchester Business School. This project
aims to address issues of sustainable growth, innov
ation and economic rebalancing. This
research project will be facilitated by a unique collaboration called the ‘Innovation Co
-
Lab’
established in March 2011 by the University of Manchester (Manchester Institute of Innovation
Research), Georgia Institute of

Technology (School of Public Policy and Enterprise Innovation
Institute), and the Beijing Institute of Technology (School of Management and Economics and
Knowledge Discovery Lab). The project will contribute to the academic community by linking the
resear
ch traditions on firm level innovation, with public policy governance and strategic
management issues and will also inform scholars working on green good industrial sectors and
on specific policy areas.


Examples of commissions for other research funders:



Qualitative research on pathways to national politics for under
-
represented groups, for EHRC in
2010, in partnership with de Montfort University and colleagues from UoM Politics.



Between 2010
-
11, an 18 month piece of action research on working in neighbour
hoods in
Bradford for JRF.





22

Examples of work for charitable funders:



A guidance manual published in 2011 for the Fair Share Trust (an organisation which distributes
Big Lottery money to areas) on how to conduct evaluations of grant funding programmes, fo
r
use by local funding panels.

Examples of work commissioned by community and voluntary sector organisations
:



In partnership with Ipsos
-
MORI and Urban Fourm, research using re
-
analysis of the Place Survey
and qualitative interviews to explore drivers for c
itizen perceptions of influence over decisions
by local public bodies, commissioned by Community Development Foundation on behalf of CLG,
published in 2010.



Qualitative research on the relationships between local councillors and community anchor
organisati
ons for Bassac

(British Association of Settlements and Social Action Centres), now
known as Locality. This research was part of a wider piece of work by Bassac for CLG on Inspiring
Democracy, and is currently being used to develop into products (e.g. tool
kits, training events)
for use by practitioners.



A review of a London
-
based charity the Octavia Foundation in 2010
-
11, looking at its

overall
mission, performance, user satisfaction and impacts. The Review was part of a three year
forward planning process

by the charity, and has led directly to several significant changes in the
charity’s work and target setting for the next three years.



Support for the North West Regional Empowerment Partnership to design and administer new
Community Empowerment Award sch
eme for local authorities, between 2010
-
11.


Examples of projects with local government



In 2010
-
11, support for the North West Employers’ Organisation (NWEO) with a voluntary
accreditation scheme for learning and development for local elected members in
local
government across the North West.



Case study research on the use of equalities data in local government, published by NWEO in
2010.



An RCT on engaging vulnerable families with SureStart in Manchester, for Manchester City
Council and New Economy in 20
10



An RCT for Manchester City Council to evaluate the central government’s new Community
Budget pilot for complex families in the region, in 2011.



A Review of re
-
settlement services for young offenders commissioned by Manchester City
Council on behalf of t
he North West regional Resettlement Consortium in 2010.



An evaluation of a community empowerment programme in Cumbria, for Cumbria County
Council in 2009
-
10.


Visit the IPEG website at
http:/
/www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/ipeg/




Institute for Social Change (ISC)


This year ISC has delivered a series of key outputs that have contributed directly to meeting UoM
strategic objectives of producing world class research and contributing to RAE/REF.

ISC have
also
secured a large number of external research grants amountin
g to approximately £600,000 in
2010/11, exceeding the targeted amount. Highlights include;


New awards

-

Various consultancies for government departments and charitable funders including the
Scottish Executive, the Libraries and Archive Council, the Nuffie
ld Foundation.


23

-

John Templeton Foundation
-

£37k The Flow of Soul: Socio
-
economic foundations of generosity in
Britain, jointly with The University of Notre Dame.

-

European Integration Fund
-

euro 1 million (for the whole consortium). “The European Immi
grants
Citizen Survey” with Migration Policy Group (Brussels) and King Baudoin Foundation (Brussels) and
several other European teams.

-

Consortium


£250,000 ‘Immigration Attitudes’ : Grants from a number of foundations including
Diana, Princess of Wales

Memorial Fund (50k); Unbound Philanthropy (50k); City Parochial
Foundation (50k); Paul Hamlyn Foundation (50k); Joseph Rowntree Foundation (25k); Joseph
Rowntree Charitable Trust (25k) and the Equality and Human Rights Commission (15k annually)
.

-

Medical

Research Council
-

£2.2m full economic “Inequalities in later life, frail
ty and
wellbeing: an
interdisciplinary approach to causality” for the next 5 years. The team led by CCSR, includes ISC
members along with others in medicine and chemistry.

-

ESRC
-

£100k
Social mobility and social capital in China and Britain, a comparative study

-

British Academy
-

£7,500 The impact of foreign birth and eth
nic difference on welfare state

support:
an experimental study.

Ongoing Grants

-

AHRC/RSA doctoral studentship
(£40k)

-

EPSRC
-

£3.2m (£1.7m in ISC) The Social Complexion of Immigration and Diversity

-

ESRC
-

£567k The Internet, Electoral Politics and Citizen Participation in Global Perspective

-

ESRC
-

£99k How different are direct mail and telephoning?

-

ESRC
-

£100k The 2010 British Election Constituency campaign Study (jointly with Brunel)

-

ESRC
-

£87k British participation in the European Values Survey

-

ESRC
-

£17k for a Seminar Series ‘The Political Representation of Ethnic Minorities’

-

ESRC
-

£161k Brit
ish Election Study Ethnic Minority Survey

-

ESRC
-

Professorial Fellowship (Gibson)

-

EHRC
-

£50k Triennial Review: Civic Life; £28K The Benchmark Race Equality Index

-

AHRC


£333k An online centre for British data on religion

-

EU


£143k Framework 7 S
upport and Opposition to Migration

-

Templeton foundation
-

£180k (jointly with Harvard)

-

European Commission £29k Multicultural democracy & immigrants in Europe.

-

European Research Council grant
-

Dr Morales
1


Publications

ISC members have been prolif
ic in publishing in high quality journals, books and edited collections. In
the reporting period more than 20 peer review journal articles appeared in print with many more
under consideration or in press. Journals in which we published span the social scie
nces and include
European Journal of Political Research, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies; Electoral Studies;
Canadian Journal of Political Science; and the Sociological Review.

Other publication include a single
authored book by Morales published b
y Routledge (see Appendix 1 for full details).


Esteem

ISC members have been very active in their disciplines and have received recognition in many
different areas. Highlights in the reporting period include:




Professor Gibson was awarded an ESRC
Professorial Fellowship



Professor Fieldhouse took up an appointment to Economic and Social Research Council
Methods
and Infrastructure Committee




1

Morales developed the bid as a research fellow ISC but has recently left to take up a Readership at Leicester.


24



Appointments to prestigious national and international survey teams and advisory boards
including the European
Values Study, the British Election Study, the Comparative Study of
Electoral Systems (BES and CSES); the Census Program Advisory Committee and the Australian
Election Study (AES)



Appointments to important academic review bodies including the ESRC Peer Rev
iew College,
seminar series commissioning panel



External examining roles at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (Demography
and Health programme), the University of Cardiff



PhD examining at Trinity College, Dublin,
Catholic University of L
euven (Belgium), Oxford
University, Open University and elsewhere



Extensive conference activity including presentations of key note addresses, awarding of
International visiting professorships and scholarships at many leading Institutions including: The
U
niversity of Oxford, the Australian National University, Autonomous University of Barcelona
(AUB); University Of Rennes; Xi’an Jiaotong,
University of Lucerne, Princeton
and Harvard
University



Professor Voas was awarded the 2010 Distinguished Article awa
rd by the Society for the
Scientific Study of Religion



In 2010 Professor Fieldhouse and Gibson were awarded editorship of the
Journal of Elections,
Public Opinion and Parties

with Mark Franklin (European University Institute).



Professor Voas appointed as

trustee to the Alister Hardy Trust



BBC Placement, Professor Rachel Gibson will
work with staff from the BBC from both R&D and
Production



Professor Yaojun Li has been working with Professors Mike Savage and Fiona Devine and Drs
Niall Cunningham and Andy Mi
les on the BBC project ‘Britain has got class’


to be aired at the
end of this year.


Organised Workshops/Conferences

The institute has hosted a number of workshops, seminars and conferences this year.



Weekly seminar series with CCSR/Social Statistics



3
day international conference on Religion and Religiosity (June 2010)



The Political Representation of Ethnic Minorities in the UK in Comparative Perspective Seminar
series held in Manchester, Oxford and London (January 2010
-
May 2011)



BES/DCERN Conference in

association with methods@manchester: Voters in Social and Political
Context (May 2011)



International Society for Social Capital and Health (ISSC) Third symposium (June 2011)



ESRC Festival of Social Science Workshop co
-
organised with Hansard Society. Even
t title:
Mobilizing the masses: What makes for an effective social media campaign?


Teaching

In addition, teaching responsibilities have grown during the lifetime of the ISC as increasing numbers
of students have enrolled. Specifically:

PhD Programme


24

students enrolled/registered from 2007 to date.



2007
-
8


4 internal studentships



2009
-
10


1 external studentships funded via the North American Foundation



2010
-
11 2 additional studentships supported through external donors for academic year
2010 (Buckle
y and Davison)

MSc Programme


38 students enrolled/registered (incl. part
-
time and full
-
time) from 2007 to date.
Competitive bursary funding of up to £1000 now offered to cover fees.



Visit the ISC website at:
http://www.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/socialchange/



25

Manchester e
-
Research Centre (MeRC)



Manchester eResearch Centre (MeRC) builds on Manchester's five years of highly successful
operation as the coordinating Hub of the National

Centre for e

Social Science (NCeSS), responsible
for the strategic management of the Centre's seven research projects (“Nodes”) at universities
across the UK. The Hub was widely recognised to have played the key part in establishing NCeSS
internationally
as the world
-
leading centre of e
-
social science, and its success has influenced
analogous developments in other countries. Rob Procter, the Director of MeRC, continues his
involvement in UK e
-
Social Science via his involvement in the ESRC Digital Social Re
search
Directorate.


From its opening on 1 October 2009, MeRC has focused two main objectives. The first of these has
been to carry forward the research programme established by the Hub. This involves two strands of
work: the application of advanced ICTs
to support social science research and the investigation of
the social and other influences on the development and use of e
-
Infrastructure. In addition to
successfully completing a number of research projects begun under the auspices of the Hub, MeRC
has s
ecured funding for four new research projects that fall under these two strands: two of these
projects, funded by JISC, involve the development and deployment of institutional research data
infrastructure at the UoM. Having contributed its requirements gat
hering expertise to a pilot
research data management service project, MeRC is now working with a range of UoM stakeholders
to roll out this service to across the University. The third project explores the application of
computational techniques for the ana
lysis of social media and involves collaborators within UoM
and at other UK universities. The aim is to explore the potential value to researchers of political
behaviour of using text mining tools to extract the semantic content of twitter feeds, e.g. peop
le,
places, topics and opinions. The project has focused initially on the analysis of tweets sent during the
recent UK AV referendum campaign. This work has led to interest from UK major media
organisations and, with funding from JISC, in collaboration wit
h a news organisation, a second and
larger twitter corpus is now in the process of being analysed. The final project, funded through the
ESRC Digital Social Research Programme, aims, by building on the NeISS project, GENeSiS NCeSS
node and TALISMAN NCRM no
de, to create a pathway to sustainable infrastructure and services for
social simulation.


The second of MeRC’s main objectives has been to broaden the domain of its research beyond e
-
Infrastructure to include ICT
-
based innovations in multiple fields. Sign
ificant progress has been made
towards this objective in the past 12 months. MeRC has been successful in winning research funding
from the National Institute for Health Research to carry out, in partnership with MBS, a study of
barriers to innovation in th
e health service. In partnership with Queen Mary University of London,
MeRC has also secured funding from the Technology Strategy Board to develop better ways of
designing and testing technologies for assisted living in older people. Finally, MeRC has secu
red
funding from the EPSRC KTA programme to integrate training technology developed in the LEMI
project can with existing commercial clinical environments and real clinical workflows. This is a
necessary step to commercial exploitation which we hope to pro
gress in the next 12 months.


Notable publication successes over the reporting period include Rob Procter being awarded a
contract (with Peter Halfpenny) by Sage’s Publisher for Research Methods for a co
-
edited book on
the topic of advanced social science
research methods. This will be published in October 2012. MeRC
staff members co
-
authored no less than 5 papers in a 2010 Philosophical Transactions of the Royal
Society A, special issue on e
-
Science.



26

Finally, MeRC is working with methods@manchester on the

delivery of an ESRC
-
funded series of 6
seminars on the topic of the ‘Impact Agenda’ and is closely involved in supporting the mission of
Manchester Informatics to develop the UoM’s multi
-
disciplinary research capacity.


27


Morgan Centre for the Study of Rel
ationships and Personal Life


The Morgan Centre was established as a focus for research in the fields of family life, contemporary
relationships and personal life.

The concept of 'personal life' covers many potential issues within the
field of intimacy, f
amily and relationships. Our focus is on everyday life issues including sexuality,
gender and generation but our methodological approaches and perspectives are found in
anthropology, history, cultural studies and socio
-
legal studies as well as within socio
logy.


Our core research is funded by the ESRC. ‘Realities’, led by Professor Jennifer Mason, is a ‘node’ of
the ESRC’s National Centre for Research Methods (NCRM), and runs from April 2008 until October
2011. ‘Realities’ is developing qualitatively
-
driven

methods and approaches to researching the
complex nature of everyday life. The programme includes two projects: Critical Associations and
Inter/generational Dynamics. ‘Realities’ has an extensive training and dissemination role which aims
to support metho
dological excellence in UK organisations within and outside academia. It also
produces popular online resources on methods and methodologies, as well as organising cutting
-
edge interdisciplinary dialogue events between academics and researchers working at
the forefront
of methodological innovation. For more details of our activities see www.manchester.ac.uk/realities.


We have two other ESRC grants:

1.

The project

‘Just Like Marriage’, led by Dr Brian Heaphy, was the first UK in
-
depth study exploring
same
-
sex
couples’ experiences of civil partnership. The project ended in March 2011.


The final seminar took place on 25
th

March and included the keynote speakers below:



Researching lesbian and gay family life: A Retrospective,
Susan Golombok, Centre for Family
Research, University of Cambridge,



Developments in thinking about same
-
sex couples and families in the context of therapy,
Damian McCann, Tavistock Centre for Couple Relationships and Associate of Pink Therapy
Service



New Directions in Lesbian Motherhood,
Dr. Róisín Ryan
-
Flood,
Centre for Intimate and
Sexual Citizenship (CISC), University of Essex



Same Sex Marriage: New gen
erations, ordinary experiences?,
Brian Heaphy, Carol Smart,
Anna Einarsdottir, Morgan Centre for the Study of Relationships and Personal

Life, University
of Manchester.


The conference was very successful and well attended by 70 delegates with a wide ranging from a
selection of backgrounds including The University of Tübingen, The University of Auckland, The
Equality and Human Rights Commi
ssion, Spectrum and The Home Office, as well as delegates from
other UK Universities and organisations.


2.

A new project investigating heterosexual and lesbian couples’ experiences of donor

conception, led by Professor Carol Smart called ‘Relative Strangers’

started in October 2010. Dr
Petra Nordqvist is Co
-
Investigator and Research Associate.


Key Activities

Professor Sue Heath

joined us as Co
-
Director in September 2010 and has continued her
collaboration on two ESRC
-
funded projects, one focusing on the hous
ing pathways of single young
adults and the second concerned with the impact of household and family formation on the
(re)migration decisions of Polish migrants living in the UK.'


We were joined by Professor Dame Janet Finch who became an associate on ret
iring from her

28

position of VC at Keele University. She has been appointed as Chair Designate of the Research
Excellence Framework review Panel C.


Dr Dale Southerton was promoted to Chair of Sociology and became Director of the new Sustainable
Practices R
esearch Group (SPRG), funded by ESRC, DEFRA and the Scottish Government. SPRG
commenced in August 2010.


Dr Brian Heaphy was promoted to Chair of Sociology in June 2011.


Further scholarly publications from our research projects. See our eprints for a full list of Realities
publications.
http://eprints.ncrm.ac.uk



We held the following events:



15
th

Jun 2011. Sociology seminar Ser
ies: ‘Counting on the bank of Mum and Dad;
Exploring Intergenerational Exchanges’.



4
th

April 2011. Engaging Qualitatively and Quantitatively



18
th

March 2011. Doing Mixed Methods Research (jointly with CRESC)



9
th

March 2011. Researching Mobilities



3
rd

March

2011. Researching Ethereality.



17
th

Feb 2011. Metaphor Analysis.



9
th

Feb 2011. Methods in Dialogue: Researching Diversity.



13
-
14
th

Jan 2011. Session on Impact in the National Centre for Research Methods
Annual Meeting.



9
th

Dec 2010. Who Needs Social Scien
ce Research? Nuffield Institute, London.



11
th

Nov 2010. Analysing Qualitative Data.



10
th

Nov 2010. Methods in Dialogue: Researching Closeness.



13
th

October 2010. Methods in Dialogue: Researching the Environment.


We provided training in Qualitative and
Mixed Methods to various groups including the Dublin
Qualitative Research Summer School; the Office for Public Management, London; and the Methods
Institute, University of Jyvasyklya, Finland; Methods@Manchester; Institute for Social Research,
Birkbeck, Un
iversity of London.


We hosted the international conference: ‘Vital Signs 2: Engaging Research Imaginations’ in
September 2010. The conference was a great success with 110 delegates attending over the three
days from over 8 different countries, ranging fro
m the USA to NZ. Over 50 papers were submitted
and the feedback from delegates was incredibly positive:


‘It was encouraging, inspiring, creative, challenging and at the same time risky! Most presentations I
attended have moved beyond the boundary of the
'
ordinary' research community…’I
‘Excellent
variety of talks and topics. It was a great opportunity to absorb ideas from different disciplines’


We continued to develop research funding applications.


The Year Ahead


The Morgan Centre will hold it
s next
international conference, “
Proximities: Thinking about
Relationality


on 14
-
15
th

September 2011. Up to 90 delegates are expected to attend the event,
which will be hosted at the University. 35 papers have been accepted and the three key note
speakers are:


29



Too close for comfort? Shared spaces, shared lives and domestic proximities
,
Professor
Sue Heath, University of Manchester



The Personal Consequences of Facebook
,
Professor Danny Miller, University College
London



Relationality as matrix, Assemblage, Network
, Web
,
Professor Valerie Walkerdine, University of
Cardiff


The joint publication of a textbook called the Sociology of Personal Life (Palgrave Macmillan). This
publication date has been set for September 2011.


In February 2012 we will be welcoming Profes
sor Betina Hollstein from the University of Hamburg as
a Simon Visiting Professor. We will be organising three events around her visit, with a focus on life
course, generation and social networks.


In November 2011 the Morgan Centre will host ‘Confluences’

a conference celebrating the work and
contribution of Professor Carol Smart. Speakers will include:




Feminist Legal Theory

(
Sally Sheldon, Professor of Law, Kent Law School
)



Historical Sociology

(
J
effrey Weeks, Emeritus Professor of Sociology, London
South Bank
University
)



Engaged Research

(
Allison James, Professor of Sociology, Co
-
Director of the Centre for the
Study of Childhood and Youth, University of Sheffield
)



Relationalities

(
Jennifer Mason, Professor of Sociology, Co
-
Director of the Morgan Cent
re for
the Study of Relationships and Personal Life, University of Manchester
)



Reflections

(
Carol Smart, Professor of Sociology, Co
-
Director of the Morgan Centre for the
Study of Relationships and Personal Life, University of Manchester
)


We will continue
our successful 'methods in dialogue' events in 2012, as well as planning two day
-
long workshops, one on 'belonging' and one on the challenges for kinship and relationality of new
reproductive technologies.


We will continue to develop

research funding appl
ications and
to produce scholarly publicati
ons
from our research projects.
We have met the objectives we set out in our previous report and the
Morgan Centre continues to expand and disseminate its scholarly work
.


Visit the Morgan Centre website at:
http://www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/morgancentre/



Other Research Centres


SoSS involvement continues in the Sustainable Consumption Institute and Brooks World Poverty
Institut
e, with Dale Southerton and Rorden Wilkinson respectively having major roles. Other groups
and networks without funding continue to be active including RICC, DCERN, Jean Monnet Centre of
Excellence, Institute for Political Economy, Gender Research Network
, Research Centre in Emotion
and Value and MANCEPT.
Information on all of these can be found on the website at

http://www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/research/centres/



30


Appendix 1 SoSS Research Awards 01 Aug 10


31 Jul 11





Name

Surname

Role

Sponsor
Name

Title

Award
Credit
Split

Value

DA

James

Banks

PI

The Institute
for Fiscal
Studies

Secondment of Professor
James Banks

1.00

382,165

Economi
cs

Michelle

Bastian

PI

AHRC

Temporal Connectivities:
A scoping study of the
available research on time
and community

0.90

29,105

SoSS RC

Ian

Bruff

PI

British
Academy

The State does not exist!
A view from a
foundational materialist
perspective

1.00

500

Politics

Tarani

Chandola

PI

British
Academy

Stress at work

1.00

10,000

Social
Statistics

Tarani

Chandola

PI

National
Centre for
Research
Methods
(NCRM)

Innovative approaches to
methodological
challenges facing ageing
cohort studies: survey
data collection,
measurement and
analysis

1.00

21,315

SoSS RC

Tarani

Chandola

CoI

MRC

Inequalities in later life
frailty and wellbeing: an
interdisciplinary approach
to causality: Full bid

0.15

266,582

SoSS RC

Sarah

Cotterill

PI

British
Association
of
Settlements
and Social
Action
Centres

Exploring the reality of
relationships between
community anchors and
local policy makers

0.50

4,230

SoSS RC

Sarah

Cotterill

CoI

The Octavia
Foundation

Octavia Foundation
Review

0.50

8,595

SoSS RC

Sarah

Cotterill

PI

Commission
for the New
Economy

The undertaking of a
randomised control trial
in order to evaluate and
compare the
effectiveness of home
visits and information
leaflets in boosting the
take
-
up of sure start
services

0.50

7,500

SoSS RC

Angela

Dale

PI

E.S.R.C.

Dynamic Inequalities:
Determinants of Poverty
1.00

76,496

SoSS RC


31

in Different European
Countries

Angela

Dale

PI

E.S.R.C.

The Impact Agenda

1.00

17,900

SoSS RC

Julian

Dodd

CoI

AHRC

Substance causation and
Agent causation

0.05

1,382

Philosop
hy

Colette

Fagan

PI

International
Labour
Organisation
(ILO)

Working time and work
life balance expert report

1.00

8,000

Sociology

Colette

Fagan

PI

Universiteit
Utrecht

Study for the
development of the basic
structure of a European
Gender Equality Index

1.00

7,637

Sociology

Edward

Fieldhou
se

PI

E.S.R.C.

Samples of Anonymised
Records Support (2011
-
12
extension)

0.34

27,479

SoSS RC

Robert

Ford

PI

Unbound
Philanthropy

Attitudes to Immigration

0.20

40,000

SoSS RC

Robert

Ford

PI

Diana,
Princess of
Wales
Memorial
Fund

Attitudes to
Immigration

0.20

40,000

SoSS RC

Robert

Ford

PI

Joseph
Rowntree
Charitable
Trust

Attitudes to Immigration

0.20

20,000

SoSS RC

Robert

Ford

PI

Joseph
Rowntree
Foundation

Attitudes to Immigration

0.20

20,000

SoSS RC

Robert

Ford

PI

British
Academy

Welfare,
Work and
Migration

1.00

7,500

SoSS RC

Lorraine

Green

CoI

Department
for Children,
Schools and
Families
(DCSF)

Systematic review of
solution focused brief
therapy

0.10

4,870

Sociology

Rachel

Griffith

PI

The Institute
for Fiscal
Studies

Secondment of
Rachel
Griffith

1.00

461,293

Economi
cs

Peter

Halfpenn
y

CoI

E.S.R.C.

The Impact Agenda

0.00

NULL

Sociology

Alan

Harding

PI

One
NorthEast

The Impacts of
Demographic Change in
the Functional Economies
of the North of England

0.60

15,600

SoSS RC

Penelope

Harvey

PI

AHRC

Memorandum of
Understanding

1.00

175,658

Social
Anthro
-
pology

Penelope

Harvey

CoI

AHRC

Temporal Connectivities:
A scoping study of the
0.10

3,234

Social
Anthro
-

32

available research on time
and community

pology

Anthony

Heath

CoI

Unbound
Philanthropy

Attitudes to Immigration

0.05

10,000

SoSS RC

Anthony

Heath

CoI

Diana,
Princess of
Wales
Memorial
Fund

Attitudes to Immigration

0.05

10,000

SoSS RC

Anthony

Heath

CoI

Joseph
Rowntree
Charitable
Trust

Attitudes to Immigration

0.05

5,000

SoSS RC

Anthony

Heath

CoI

Joseph
Rowntree
Foundation

Attitudes to Immigration

0.05

5,000

SoSS RC

Anthony

Heath

PI

E.S.R.C.

British Election Study
Ethnic Minority Survey

1.00

161,652

SoSS RC

Andrew

Irving

PI

British
Academy

Life Journeys 2

1.00

63,681

Social
Anthro
-
pology

Yaojun

Li

PI

E.S.R.C.

Social mobility and social
capital in China and
Britain: a comparative
study

1.00

79,991

SoSS RC

Yaojun

Li

PI

John
Templeton
Foundation

Stimulating innovative
global research in the
science of generosity: An
RFP and
primary research
initiative on the scientific
study of the origins,
manifestations and
consequences

1.00

34,250

SoSS RC

Sharon

Macdona
ld

PI

Leverhulme
Trust

Ethnography and the
exhibition of minority
cultural heritage in China

1.00

17,055

Social
Anthro
-
pology

Andrew

Miles

PI

EPSRC

Sustainable transport
evidence and modelling
paradigms: Cohort
household analysis to
support new goals in
engineering design

0.50

312,437

SoSS RC

Andrew

Miles

PI

AHRC

Understanding Everyday
Participation
-

Articulating
Cultural Values

1.00

11,992

SoSS RC

Niamh

Moore

CoI

EPSRC

Sustainable transport
evidence and modelling
paradigms: Cohort
household analysis to
support new goals in
engineering design

0.50

312,437

SoSS RC

Niamh

Moore

PI

AHRC

Connecting communities
through

food: The
1.00

6,394

SoSS RC


33

development of
community supported
agriculture in the UK

Laura

Morales

PI

Juan March
Foundation

Do Traditional "Get Out
The Vote" Campaing
Methods Work in Spain?
A pilot experiment on
non
-
partisan Mobilisation
of immigrant
and native
voters

1.00

10,784

SoSS RC

Kevin

Morgan

PI

Barry Amiel
and Normal
Melburn
Trust

An inventory of the
papers of Edmund Frow
(1906
-
1997)

1.00

5,951

Politics

James

Nazroo

CoI

Department
of Health

Recognition of and
consultation f
or memory
problems

among south
A
sian elders

0.03

2,706

Sociology

James

Nazroo

CoI

Manchester
Mental
Health &
Social Care
Trust

Recognition of and
consultation f
or memory
problems among south
A
sian elders

0.03

7,427

Sociology

James

Nazroo

PI

E.S.R.C.

The ethnic density
effect
on the health of ethnic
minority people in the
United Kingdom: a study
of hypothesised pathways

1.00

148,413

Sociology

James

Nazroo

PI

MRC

Inequalities in later life
frailty and wellbeing: an
interdisciplinary approach
to causality: Full bid

0.35

622,024

SoSS RC

Petra

Nordqvis
t

PI

British
Academy

Out of Sight, Out of Mind:
The Construction of
'Togetherness' in Lesbian
Couples' Conception
Stories

1.00

0

SoSS RC

Petra

Nordqvis
t

CoI

E.S.R.C.

Relative Strangers:
Negotiating Non
-
Genetic
Kinship in the

Context of
Assisted Conception

0.00

NULL

SoSS RC

John

O'Neill

PI

Joseph
Rowntree
Foundation

Climate Change, Justice
and insurance

1.00

7,522

Philosop
hy

Robert

O'Neill

PI

E.S.R.C.

Further examination of
methods for modelling
multivariate financial
asset
volatility

1.00

0

Economi
cs

Inderjeet

Parmar

PI

British
Academy

Smart power, smart
philanthropy: hard, soft
and smart power in the
American Century

1.00

5,445

Politics


34

Ian

Plewis

CoI

E.S.R.C.

Mathematics teaching
and learning in secondary
schools: the
impact of
pedagogical practices on
important learning
outcomes

0.10

22,303

Social
Statistics

Rob

Procter

CoI

E.S.R.C.

The Impact Agenda

0.00

NULL

Sociology

Rob

Procter

PI

E.S.R.C.

Assisted Living Innovation
Platform Economic &
Business Models

1.00

43,603

Sociology

Rob

Procter

PI

EPSRC

Exploiting a computer
-
based learning
environment to meet
training needs in
mammography

1.00

48,716

Sociology

Rob

Procter

PI

E.S.R.C.

National Strategic
Director for E
-
Social
Science

1.00

26,660

Sociology

Kingsley

Purdam

PI

AHRC

Religion and belief's,
discrimination and
equality in England and
Wales: Theory, policy and
practice (2000
-
2010)

1.00

39,915

Social
Statistics

Elizabeth

Richards
on

PI

Community
Development
Foundation

Devel
o
ping a more
comprehensive
understanding
of place
survey data and its
relationship with N14

1.00

10,104

SoSS RC

Elizabeth

Richards
on

CoI

British
Association
of
Settlements
and Social
Action
Centres

Exploring the reality of
relationships between
community anchors and
local policy makers

0.50

4,230

SoSS RC

Elizabeth

Richards
on

PI

The Octavia
Foundation

Octavia Foundation
Review

0.50

8,595

SoSS RC

Elizabeth

Richards
on

CoI

Commission
for the New
Economy

The undertaking of a
randomised control trial
in order to evaluate and
compare the
effectiveness of home
visits and information
leaflets in boosting the
take
-
up of sure start
services

0.50

7,500

SoSS RC

Elizabeth

Richards
on

PI

Joseph
Rowntree
Charitable
Trust

Areas, Wards and
Neighbourhoods Project

1.00

16,531

SoSS RC

Elizabeth

Richards
on

PI

AHRC

Connect communities:
Illuminating the evolution
of community
participation: An inter
-
0.50

4,250

SoSS RC


35

disciplinary international
review

Elizabeth

Richards
on

PI

AHRC

Connected communities:
Problematizing co
-
production

0.50

4,339

SoSS
RC

Michael

Savage

PI

E.S.R.C.

Council housing, slum
clearance and the
modernization of working
class neighbourhoods in
contemporary Britain

1.00

72,408

SoSS RC

Michael

Savage

CoI

EPSRC

Sustainable transport
evidence and modelling
paradigms: Cohort
household analysis to
support new goals in
engineering design



SoSS RC

Nina

Schiller

PI

The Danish
Research
Academy

Social cohesion and
ethnic diversity and
ethnic diversity values
and local implications

1.00

79,273

SoSS RC

Hermann

Schmitt

CoI

The
Moulton
Charitable
Trust

Pilot Randomised Trial of
Copper Chelation by TETA
(Tri
-
Ethylene
-
Tetramine)
to Improve Cardiac Mass,
Arterial Function +/
-

Other Organ Damage in
Type 2 Diabetes.



Politics

Marianne

Sensier

PI

E.S.R.C.

Understanding the welsh
economy

1.00

17,925

Economi
cs

Carol

Smart

PI

E.S.R.C.

Relative Strangers:
Negotiating Non
-
Genetic
Kinship in the Context of
Assisted Conception

1.00

299,255

SoSS RC

Sam

Smith

CoI

E.S.R.C.

Samples of Anonymised
Records Support (2011
-
12
extension)

0.33

26,671

SoSS RC

Gindo

Tampubo
lon

CoI

MRC

Inequalities in later life
frailty and wellbeing: an
interdisciplinary approach
to causality: Full bid

0.25

444,303

SoSS RC

Stephen

Wade

CoI

E.S.R.C.

The Impact Agenda



Social
Anthro
-
pology

Stephen

Wade

PI

Leverhulme
Trust

Public Engagament
with
ge
nomic research and
race in L
atin America

1.00

249,966

Social
Anthro
-
pology

Josephine

Wathan

CoI

E.S.R.C.

Samples of Anonymised
Records Support (2011
-
12
extension)

0.33

26,671

SoSS RC

Ann

Whittle

PI

AHRC

Substance

causation and
Agent causation

0.95

26,265

Philosop
hy


36

Angelia

Wilson

PI

Leverhulme
Trust

Constructing Social Values
as Political Strategy

1.00

34,434

Politics

Maja

Zehfuss

PI

British
Academy

Culturally Sensitive War
and the Problem of Ethics

1.00

500

Politics





Total

48.60

5,011,619









37


Appendix 2a Hallsworth and Simon Visiting Professors 2011
-
12


Name

DA/RD Affiliation

Simon/Hallsworth

Professor Betina
Hollstein

Morgan Centre

Simon

Professor Bernard
H Russell

Mitchell Centre

Simon

Professor Mark
Machina

Economics

Hallsworth

Professor Edward
Prescott

Economics

Hallsworth

Professor Steven
Robbin
s

Social Anthropology

Hallsworth

Professor Mark
Handcock

CCSR

Hallsworth



Appendix 2b SoSS Small Grants 2011
-
12


Applicant Name

Project
Title

Funds
Awarded

Hannah Knox

Political Materials: Excavation, Transformation,
Incorporation

1500

Katsushi Imai & Xiaobing Wing

Manchester
-
Oxford Research Workshop on
Poverty and Inequality in China and India

1230

Laurene Lessard
-
Phillips & Maria
Sobolewska

Integration: A bottom
-
up perspective

1943

Madeleine Reeves

2 day international workshop on Ethnography,
emotion and the affective life of the state

2650

Nick Turnbull

Research Development Meetings for the Rhetoric
in Politics Group, Political
Studies Association, UK

1557

Piers Robinson

Cross national (Uk, Germany, Israel) comparison
of media representation of civilian and military
casualties during war

3000

Rupert Cox

Exhibition at the Okinawan prefectural museum in
Naha city, Japan

2050

Thomas Smith

To finance a high profile conference "Collective
Intentionality VIII", August 28
-
31 2012

2920

Virinder S Kalra & James Rhodes

Proposal for funding for a symposium: "The State
of Race"

2495

Will Jennings & Rob Ford

A longitudinal analysis of
public opinion about race
and immigration in Britain

2777





Total

22122